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OfVOTf O TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OP CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 

I amd PmbHtkod fiery Saturday by tkt Proprietor* Km ■■ 

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5^A' FRANCISCO, SATt'RDAY. JANUARY 3, 1891. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Pag* 

1 



Leaping Article? : 
Reform nt I(aik) 

• nt for oar VIUcul- 

larblfl ] 

The New Japanese Constitution 1 

Cable CodqccMod with Hawaii 2 
California at the Worlds Fair 

Hi.- tit 2 

Our Judges' Salaries 2 

rhe An ol Farce-Comedy 3 

Amending the Inu-r.-tate Law 3 
Manufacturing a New Ballot 

Law 3 

Statu.- of the Silver Question. . . 3 

4 

Kitchen Gardeus ... 5 

Pleasure's Wand - 6 

Pleasure's Wand (continued) 7 

Sparks 8 

The Railroads 9 

Sporting 10 



P \ OS 

Shota From the Mitrailleuse n 

<;<>thaui Gossip ia 

. 18 
Financial Review li 

ler .... is 

•• Bli "—Summary of the Markets. 16 
se Jar ........ 17 

Real Property is 

The Bourse and Underwriter. . 19 

Scientific and Useful. 20 

Sunt. earns 'Jl 

Fhe Library Tahle 22 

World. Flesh and Devil 23 

\ Bundle of Epigrams ... 24 

Our American Bismarck 24 

Turkey Hash 25 

A Large Sum Wanted 25 

Pearls (Poetry) 26 

The Regular Army 26 

Comments on Foreign Affairs ... 28 



REFORM AT HAND. 

SAN FRANCISCO, which has so long been the awful example 
of American politics, is apparently about to become the model 
city of the world in the matter of government. The Blind White 
Devil and his nine imps are still in power, but in two days more 
they will be bustled into outer darkness, where there is wailing 
and gnashing of teeth. Their successors will be patriots of a 
purity of character unexampled since the days of Washington 
and Franklin. There is no doubt of the fact, for we have it on 
the authority of the patriots themselves. The proceedings in the 
contest of Murphy against Mahoney have been a revelation to 
the cynical residents of this hardened town. Faith in public 
virtue had become almost extinct when this lesson came to re- 
vive it. One of the Saints of the new dispensation is Mr. Philip 
Crim ruins. Mr. Crimmins takes an interest in politics, as every 
good citizen should. He went so far, he said, when questioned, 
as to spend $200 or $300 of his own money about various saloons 
in the interest of his party. But he never received anything from 
candidates for the purchase of votes or the manipulation of con- 
ventions. He thought that the various clubs luoked after the 
selection of delegates. He had talked with Mr. Stow about the 
desirability of having good men to watch things in the Registrar's 
office, but he did not know whether anything was done. In fact, 
Mr. Crimmins' chief fault seems to be that he is too much of a 
Mugwump. Like our best citizens generally, he finds the re- 
quirements of active political work distasteful to him. There are 
too many rough people to be met, and too many things going on 
of a nature to shock a sensitive conscience. This feeling is 
natural, but it is one that should be overcome. We need high- 
minded men like Mr. Crimmins in our politics, and they should 
be willing to sacrifice their own feelings to some extent for the 
common good. How else are we to have reform? Another of 
the gentlemen whose rare qualities have been brought out in th 9 
Murphy case, is Mr. Martin Kelly. Mr. Kelly is not a politician. 
He is a tool manufacturer, and has no other business. He knows 
nothing of any such firm as Crimmins & Kelly. He goes to Mr. 
Crimmins' Geary street saloon simply because the proprietor is 
his friend, and friends should patronize each other. No doubt 
Mr. Crimmins sends to Mr. Kelly's tool factory when he needs a 
new handle to one of his corkscrews. Mr. Kelly takes consider- 
able interest in politics, but had nothing to do with naming the 
delegates to the late Republican Conventions. When asked who 
attended to that formality, he responded, with dignity: "I pre- 
sume the people do that." He knew nothing about any under- 
hand proceedings. " I was conducting a campaign on principle," 
he said. On that' fateful Tuesday, when the untutored voters of 
the Lindell and the What Cheer were anxiously asking for instruc- 
tion in the principles of the two parties, Mr. Kelly had only ten or 
twelve dollars in his house. He relied entirely upon moral suasion, 
and the effectiveness of this method of argument was triumphantly 
demonstrated when the polls closed. It seems almost too good 
to be true, that San Francisco is to be ruled for the next two 
years by such upright citizens as Mr. Crimmins and Mr. Kelly. 
We can not pretend to explain how two gentlemen of their char- 
acter could have come to the surface in the turbid pool of local 
politics. It is a rare phenomenon, and we should make the most 
of it while we have the chance. 



RAQKMENT FOR OUR VTTICULTURISTS. 



THERE i* a good deal ol lobetanUal ami logical encouragement 
for our vim- pr-.\\ en and wine maker* in (hi- report 

by Mr. DeTurk, Pre* id en I of our Hoard ..f state Viticulture! 
OomrolnlonafSi end there is good * ansa for congratulation in the 

fact, aa for the pael t\\ or three yean the wine industry ol Cali- 
fornia baa a offered a series ol set-backs, traceable to ■ variety ol 
osee Mr. DeTnrk assigns In pan to the undue 

ittmnlUS given to vineyard planting in the past, through the mis- 
taken idea thai a vineyard, under any circumstances and in any 
bands, mual necessarily prove a valuable piece of property. This 
Condition Of things led to an over-production of wine, with which 
the consumption did not keep pace, with the further result of 
making grapes a drug in the market, and the throwing of the 
wines upon the market, and into the hands of wealthy cellarers 
and jobbers at any price the manufacturer could get. Large 
growers, of course, with capital and good cellar accommodation, 
could afford to keep on storing their vintages, provided these 
were of good quality, and wait for their appreciation in value, 
but a large proportion of wines were of very ordinary quality, 
made by inexperienced hands, and a market had to be found for 
them at once. Mr. De Turk, however, now consoles the grower 
with the reflection that the prestige of California wines is steadily 
growing in the Eastern States, as it is certainly also in Europe, 
and that through the concerted action and systematic methods of 
the Viticultural Commission, assisted by the proselytizing labors 
of Kate Field, and the establishment of agencies and branches by 
the principal producers and merchants all over the continent, the 
consumption of our wines is steadily on the increase. Attention 
is also called to the fact that vines planted now will not come 
into grape-bearing condition for four years to come, and that, 
therefore, those growers now possessing bearing vineyards, need 
not fear for the future the depression which has beset them in the 
past. It was the extensive planting in the years prior to 1886 
that, in the idea of the Commissioners, is responsible for the three 
years of depression from which the industry is just recovering. 
Wine producing may yet be the paramount industry of the State, 
and in the opinion of many competent judges, cannot fail to be 
so. The Viticultural Commission has done, and is doing excel- 
lent work, and has still a balance of $17,500 of the $35,000 ap- 
propriated by the Legislature, to use during the coming fiscal 
year. The object of this appropriation was to promote the intro- 
duction and sale of California wines, and the report shows that 
the Commissioners have adhered strictly to this object. 



THE NEW JAPANESE CONSTITUTION. 



IT is difficult for any one tolerably well-acquainted with the 
unprogressive conservatism of Oriental races, to realize either 
the extent or the significance of the late political movement in 
Japan, which, though it has been in process of parturition, so to 
speak, for more than twenty years, culminated only the other 
day in the convening of a full-fledged Parliament, with an Upper 
and Lower House, a Cabinet, and all the other regulation appur- 
tenances of the Caucasian political system. Mail news has only 
just reached us of the ceremonies attending the opening of the 
Japanese Parliament, and very interesting it is to read about. 
In accordance with a provision ot* the New Constitution a day 
was set for the formal opening of the Chambers, which took 
place in that portion of the New Parliament Building at Tokio, 
allotted to the House of Peers. First of all the spectators, each 
with a regular invitation, were ushered by the Court officials to 
the places set apart for them in the gallery. Then the members 
of the Diplomatic corps entered and took their places beside the 
Imperial dais. Next the nobility, composing the House of Peers, 
filed in, resplendent in gorgeous robes, and ranged themselves 
upon the right of the House. These were quickly followed by 
the members of the House of Commons, who entered by another 
door and took their places on the left, all in the de rigueur broad- 
cloth evening dress suits, after the most approved Occidental 
fashion. A few minutes later the Cabinet, Ministers of State and 
other high functionaries came in, speedily followed by the Mika- 
do and suite, in military uniforms and court dress, who had 
meanwhile been making a ceremonial progress through the 
streets in carriages of state for the delectation of the common 
people. That brevity constituted an important part of the 
ceremonial is to be inferred from the fact that the Mikado only 
remained five minutes in the building, three of which were con- 
sumed in reading the Imperial speech, formally conferring 
Constitutional powers upon the assembled Houses. The Mikado 
has been at work upon the New Constitution ever since his ac- 
cession twenty-three years ago, and it embraces everything from 
local government to a budget. The Japanese have proved them- 
selves so docile and willing to take advantage of the best features 
of Western civilization in other respects, that it may be pretty 
confidently predicted they will fall readily into the acceptance of 
the new political regime. There is nothing of the pig-headed 
Chinese obstinacy and adherence to tradition, merely because it 
is tradition, about the intelligent little Islanders. They are not too 
proud to acknowledge the superiority of Western arts and 
Western institutions, as the Chinese, though by no means slow 
to employ them, most undoubtedly are. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



CABLE CONNECTION WITH HAWAII. 

FOE several years past, an organized effort has been made by 
the more progressive element in the Hawaiian Islands to se- 
cure telegraphic communication with the mainland of America. 
This movement has at last assumed such proportions that a 
Commissioner, in the person of one of the leading members of the 
Hawaiian bar, passed through this city last week, en route for the 
East, to negotiate for the construction of a submarine cable from 
Honolulu to some point on the American coast, the islanders not 
seeming to care particularly what point, so long as communica- 
tion is established. The gentleman commissioned with the pro- 
motion of the project is understood to be empowered to negotiate 
with the Government at Washington, presumably with a view to 
the obtaining of an appropriation or subsidy for the work. He is 
said, however, not to be especially anxious whether he succeeds 
there or not, as if he does not, his purpose is to proceed to Lon- 
don and exploit the business there. The Hawaiians know per- 
fectly well the value of the trump hand they hold in this matter. 
It has long been the policy of the King to play England against 
America for political supremacy in the Islands, and it is more 
than believed that his present visit to this country has more sig- 
nificance in it-than attaches to a mere junketing tour, but will be 

extended perfectly unintentionally, of course — to the seat of 

government. The time is getting more and more ripe every day, 
when the anachronous little island kingdom of the Pacific must 
make its choice into the arms of what protectorate, European or 
American, it will throw itself. Locality and interest would seem 
to indicate this country as the future possessor, but our Govern- 
ment exhibits the same supineness and luke-warmth upon this 
question, as it has been long accustomed to upon all matters af- 
fecting the Pacific Coast, and it will require the combined efforts 
of all our representatives at Washington to make them see mat- 
ters in their true light. England, on the other hand, would be 
likely to jump at a proposition which would give it anew and most 
important foothold in the Pacific. Canada, too, must not be left 
out of consideration in this connection. Victoria is practically as 
close to the Sandwich Islands, on a great circle, as San Francisco 
or any point upon the coast, and the Canadians are, as every one 
knows, branching out at present in all matters of energy and en- 
terprise. The laying of a cable from Victoria to Honolulu would 
only be a stepping-stone on the way of telegraphic communica- 
tion between this continent and Japan, or Australia by way of 
the South Sea Island groups. Such a cable system will un- 
doubtedly be laid sooner or later, and those who cake time by the 
forelock will be proportionately the gainers. The wire line in 
question would be a fitting and most important supplement to 
the Australian line of steamers starting from this end of the 
Canadian Pacific Railroad, and the two together would practically 
throw the Australasian trade into the hands of our neighbors on 
the north. Though there is no ostensible connection between the 
simultaneous visits to this country of King Kalakaua and the 
cable promoter referred to, there may be more in it than appears 
on the surface, if His Majesty does, after all, extend bis peregrin- 
ations to Washington. The cost of the laying of a cable between 
Honolulu and this Coast is estimated at three million dollars, and 
the Hawaiian Government is said to be willing to appropriate 
twenty-five thousand dollars a year for fifteen years to assist. 

CALIFORNIA AT THE WORLDS FAIR. 

THAT matters are being pushed in respect of a fitting State rep- 
resentation at the coming World's Fair in Chicago, was 
evinced the other evening at the State Board of Trade rooms, 
where the representatives of the State Association mustered in 
force and introduced and passed several important resolutions 
bearing on the object in question. Drafts of two bills were re- 
ported, one to appropriate $300,000 for collecting and maintaining 
a general exhibit of California products, the other to permit the 
county governments to appropriate sums ranging from $7,500 to 
$50,000, in proportion to their importance, for the collection and 
maintenance of individual county exhibitions. Another resolu- 
tion was introduced and carried in favor of utilizing all the ap- 
propriated money in making the State exhibition a collective one 
— by which it is scarcely clear whether it is meant to swamp the 
individualities of counties in a classified general exhibition of State 
products, or whether it is merely meant that the products of the 
State should be strictly localized to one portion of the building. 
If the former is the true interpretation of this last resolution, 
would it not have the effect of depriving counties of the stimulus 
born of rivalry, unless indeed each county of, say, the citrus belt, 
should be permitted to designate in some marked manner its par- 
ticular place in the aggregate exhibit of that class, and so on of 
the other classes of products in the same manner. If this is not 
what is meant it is respectfully submitted to the State Associa- 
tion that it ought to be, as by an arrangement of this sort county 
individuality could be consistently combined with State unity of 
products. The gentlemen entrusted with the conduct of the ex- 
hibition are evidently working hard and earnestly to make it a 
success and deserve the thanks of the community. 



•THE NEW BOSSES. 



IT is idle to pretend to doubt, as an evening contemporary does, 
that our local politics are under the control of new Bosses. 
Buckley, of course, is for the present dethroned. He has very 
wisely taken himself out of sight and out of mind for the time 
being. But before he left, he made no secret of his belief that 
"the boys would loudly call for him to come back again before 
long." He intimated that he would yet be deemed " a saint in 
comparison with the new Bosses." This may or may not prove 
to be true. It depends very much upon the standpoint from 
which it is viewed. "The boys " may, probably, soon come to 
realize that the den on Bush street was a surer and safer institu- 
tion than the one now established and flourishing on Geary street, 
but that is a matter which only concerns the seekers after plunder. 
Citizens desirous of good government will be more anxious about 
higher affairs. The good men of all parties, who joined in deal- 
ing a death blow to Buckleyism, would like to know that at the 
same time they had destroyed Bossism in general. They want no 
more tampering with the judiciary, no more interference with the 
School Board, no more solid nines in the Board of Supervisors, no 
more jobbery in what the city has to sell or needs to buy, and no 
more corrupt influencing of official action. Their ardent wish is 
for an honest, capable and economical management of municipal 
affairs. To that end they voted the extinction of an evil regime. 
They meant by that action all that it implied. It could not and 
certainly did not imply the replacing of one evil by another. It 
did not mean the substituting of Crimmins and Kelly for Buck- 
ley and Rainey. It was not the intention to merely transfer the 
transaction of public business from one whisky shop to another. 
The hope, no doubt, was that Heads of Departments, Supervi- 
sors, School Directors, Judges and Legislators were being voted 
for who would deem themselves servants of the public and notof 
the Bosses. It is a little early yet to say that they are doomed to 
a very lamentable disappointment, but it is not too early to raise 
the warning cry that the indications all point that way. It is now 
known that scarcely a nomination was obtained without the con- 
sent of the New Bosses, who are attempting to dictate things pre 
cisely as Buckley did. Men openly talk of going to Geary street 
to " learn their fate," when seeking office, and the dictum of that 
locality is already being accepted as final. Crimmins goes to Sac- 
ramento to help run the Legislature, while Kelly remains in San 
Francisco to teach the new Supervisors the way in which they 
are expected to go. This looks so much like the Bossism of 
Buckley as to render it difficult to discern the difference. Doubt- 
less time will reveal it to us. 



OUR JUDGES' SALARIES. 



IT is understood that at the forthcoming session of the Legis- 
lature a Constitutional amendment will be adopted for sub- 
mission to popular vote, increasing the salaries of our Judges. 
The proposal is favored by the best minds in the State, and is so 
obviously wise that it ought to pass and be finally ratified. Of 
course it cannot be made retro-active, and will apply only to 
Judges who may hereafter be elected. The class of men who 
sought election at present prices could not justly complain at 
being left to enjoy salaries they took so much pains to obtain. 
But a higher grade of Judges is required, and experience shows 
that the only way to secure adequate services is to grant ade- 
quate pay. That is true in all walks of life, and, since the pas- 
sage of the New Constitution, has proven to be exceptionally 
true in reference to Judicial employment. The salaries paid have 
not invariably secured candidates of the right stamp. In no 
other position does the nasty so surely follow the cheap as in that 
of the selection of Judges. In point of fact, an incompetent or 
dishonest Judge is dear at any price. Our Judicial officers should 
be men fairly well advanced in years and of mature judgment. 
It is ridiculous to see boys on the Bench and Nestors at the Bar. 
The trouble is that the Bench holds out no prospect for men be- 
yond middle age. If our Judges live out their allotted days they 
must die paupers. The knowledge of that fact induces all too 
many of them to engage in outside speculations not calculated to 
add to their calmness of mind, or to their personal freedom from 
entangling alliances. We know it is said that Judges should 
provide for their old age as other men do, by saving as they go 
along. But how is that to be accomplished when there is no. 
margin left for saving? How is a Superior Judge with a family, 
and such home surroundings as his station in life calls for, to 
save out of a salary of $4,000 a year? Even a Supreme Judge, 
with a salary of $6,000 a year, can put little or nothing by for a 
rainy day. And this is true even when he is the most saving 
and careful of men. If he happens to indulge in any of the 
many extravagancies that all men are more or less liable to, he is 
necessarily in a condition of chronic impecuniosity, and, there- 
fore, unfit for the Bench. Judges differ in this matter as other 
men do. They have their tastes and fancies like all of us. When 
corporations need a first-class lawyer tbey seek him at a price 
they know will secure his services and leave him with a mind 
at ease, and, therefore, at his best. The people must pursue like 
ways if they would secure like results. 



Jan. 1 



BAN PR tXCm NEWS 1 BTTER. 



THE AGE OF FARCE-COMr I>Y 

PR a century which boasts so moofa "f Its Intellect tod - 
nirnl. and which nukrn lach esthetic professions, the r 
the present day for farce-Conn if not 

Inexplicable. The nunic Itself, f. Is ■ hyphenated 

monstrosity, which ought n->t t.> ! t In the Ian 

A farce must necessarily be a comedy, while a oomedy n 
may not be a farce: but a farce*coniedy b neither one thing nor 
the nther. However, H does nol matter much what it is called; 

the point of interest is the almost universal fondness for thlfl sort 
of theatrical exhibition and the sin cess which farce-comedies have, 
at least all over the (foiled State-. The oomposltion of the farce- 
comedy is simple enough, at least in theory. It la constructed 
generally on some one incident of a humorous nature, sometimes 
a personal peculiarity, sometimes an embarrassing or amusing 
situation, sometimes a fad or hobby which is easily recognized 
and readily turned into ridicule, and sometin.es a popular erase 01 
delusion. One thing i9 common to the whole range of farce- 
comedies, they have no plot which deserves the name, and no 
motif except to present a series of laughable and generally absurd 
incidents. This in itself is legitimate drama enough, and has been 
recognized as such since the days of Aristophanes, and did the 
farce-comedian stop here, there would be no room for criticism of 
his methods; but he does not. He lugs in by the ears all sorts of 
" variety business," as theatrical people call it, he introduces 
horse-play and knockabouts, he inflicts upon his audiences that 
inexcusable horror known as the topical song, and then, to 
lighten up the gloom — the one pardonable anachronism of his 
work — he sends several black-stockinged maidens tripping on to 
the stage, who sing more or less well, and never lose a chance to 
exhibit their well-filled hose and their dainty lingerie, and there 
we have the modern farce-comedy. To explain its continued 
popularity seems impossible, unless upon the theory that man- 
kind would rather be amused, even by cheap and coarse fun, than 
to be instructed. Shakespeare to-day will drive a theatrical 
manager into bankruptcy, while the "Tooting Bazoo," or the 
" Bronze Donkey " will fill his pockets with coin of the realm. It 
is not very creditable to our mentality or intellectuality that such 
should be the case, but facts are stubborn things, and there is no 
denying the assertion that the farce-comedy is the most popular 
theatrical enterprise of the day. Perhaps we ought to be ashamed 
of ourselves, and may be some day we shall be ; but just now the 
sway of the topical singer and the black-stockinged girl is too 
powerful to be resisted, so we may as well fall in with the crowd, 
and laugh afterwards at our own folly in being so easily amused. 



AMENDING THE INTER-STATE LAW. 



THE authors of the Inter-State Commerce Law see that the 
pooling of rates by railroads, if properly supervised and 
regulated, is not so bad a thing after all. They see that it tends 
to lessen operating expenses and steadies railroad charges and 
makes them more certain, and, therefore, more advantageous in 
the long run to the shipper. Therefore, they are for amending it 
in that particular. Senator Cullom, who is in some sense the 
father of the present law, has agreed with Senator Dawes, and 
they have a bill now before the Senate which is likely to pass, 
which provides that a railroad may divert a portion of its freight 
business to another road according to some agreed proposition, 
which is to be filed with and approved by the Inter-State Com- 
mission. This, it will be seen, is a physical pool as distinguished 
from a money pool, wherein earnings instead of freight are 
divided. The two things are practically one and the same. 
There is a little more red tape and circumlocution in the one plan 
than in the other. In principle there is no substantial difference 
between them. It would have been better if the issue bad been met 
openly and squarely. But as there seems to have been some old 
sentiment opposed to this, a division of traffic is better than no 
relief at all. If we ought, in certain cases, to have something in 
the nature of pooling, it would be easier to divide money than 
freight. But it is better to reach home by a roundabout way 
than not to get there at all. In the end, the lesson will be learnt 
of reaching the desired destination by the nearest way there. 
But a matter of important public policy should be openly and 
understanding^ discussed to the end that the public should com- 
prehend the why and the wherefore of what is taking place. If 
the Inter-State Law does not work in this particular, let its 
authors straightforwardly, rather than by an indirection, say so. 
We shall then know that they have become conscious of not 
being as infallible as they thought they were. In that case, it 
will be rendered easier to believe that there are other directions in 
which the act may be wisely amended. The long and short haul 
clause may then stand a chance of being fairly considered upon 
its merits. Whenever it is so considered it will either have to go 
or be very greatly modified. It is neither fair nor right that the 
Canadian road should, because of this clause, be able to steal away 
from our roads a large share of the border traffic. The great 
railroads are not paying as they should, and the question now is 
as to whether they do not need protection as well as the other 
interests of the country. 



MANUFACTVKINQ A NEW BALLOT LAW. 

OUR law manufacturers art aboul to begin work upon a new 
ballot system, Ben a tor Dibble would be con ten 1 with ■ Utile 
tinkering at the present method, but the general eoneensoi of opin- 
ion Is In aror of the adoption <>f the main principle of th< 

Indian act The question arises as i<< \\ bal the defect is in the 
California law, and what its remedy, n is claimed that the bal- 
lot i nol secret and that, in consequence, it can be bought and 
sold, and thai the voter who casta it oan be Influenced and In- 
timidated. That thin defect exlstfl there cannot be the Shadow 
of a doubt The voters of California have not bail as much reason 
S8 those of the Etas I to complain "f this defect being turned to a 
bad use. But there have been a few complainings even here, and 
it may be that there has been oauafi for more than have found 
voice. The Labor Assi.e : aiions say that their earnest demand for 
the Australian system is born of actual experience of its necessity. 
That is to say, members of their associations have experienced 
the effecte of undue Influence and intimidation. Their class 
would be the one most likely to be made to feel pressure of that 
kind, and that they honestly believe they need relief is evidenced 
by their z.ealous action in this connection. As to vote buying, it 
is not easy to furnish the proofs, but it is not in doubt that it 
has been more than once resorted to. In the East they have 
traveled further on the road of an intimidated and corrupted bal- 
lot than we have, and, as a consequence, the demand for reform 
is louder there. No doubt, in time, we should overtake our faster 
traveling brethren and fashion our election morals after theirs. 
Meanwhile, is this not a case in which » ignorance is bliss," and 
in which it is " a folly to be wise? " Why travel further on a bad 
road? We are certainly not envious of the reputation of Dorsey 
or Dudley. The latter purchased voters in » blocks of five." and, 
in order to see that they delivered the goods, had them vote their 
pre-arranged ballots under the eyes of a Boss. Precisely the same 
thing can be done under the California law. The merit of the 
Australian system is that, being absolutely secret, it is useless to 
buy or intimidate the voter. The one objection raised against it 
is that the voter would be unduly puzzled by the effort to make 
a cross against the name of the candidate he desired to vote for. 
For the dense stupidity of such a voter there is no providing. At 
present, if he wants to vote intelligently, he has to obliterate one 
name and substitute another. 



STATUS OF THE SILVER QUESTION. 

THE last session of Congress passed an act, after long and 
wearisome discussion, providing that the Secretary of the 
Treasury should buy 4,500,000 ounces of silver per month. The 
effect of such purchases, it was believed, would be to take silver 
up to its old par value with gold. This belief was based upon 
the calculation that if the United States took all its own silver 
product out of the market, there would not be enough left to sup- 
ply the world's demands, and that, in consequence, the price of 
silver would advance. It was, in short, an attempt to corner the 
market. The supply of the United States during 1889 was $54,- 
000,000. To buy that up would be to leave the rest of the world 
to its own resources, which were not believed to be equal to the 
average demand. If the calculation had been based upon accurate 
data, the plan adopted could hardly have failed to accomplish the 
desired results. For a brief period the selling price increased, and 
it looked as if the predictions of the mpn wbo advocated the com- 
promise measure, which Congress approved, would be realized. 
But it turned out that the advance in price was only short-lived, 
and was owing purely to a temporary spurt of speculation. It is 
now said that the whole difficulty is owing to there being in 
New York a horde of some $12,000,000 of silver, which must 
needs be bought up and got out of the way before it will be pos- 
sible to corner the market, as originally contemplated. Accord- 
ingly it is now proposed to buy the over-supply and to leave the 
existing silver law in other respects to stand as it is. This pro- 
posal has the support of the Secretary of the Treasury, and it is 
believed to be approved by the President. This would seem to 
indicate that it is also favored by Wall street, which is anxious 
for a compromise short of free and unlimited coinage. All this 
would be very well if the original calculation were sound. But it 
is not. It is now clear that there is a great deal of silver in the 
world ready to be unloaded upon the United States. Whilst that 
is so, all attempts at cornering must fail. The silver men now 
realize that fact fully, and aTe bent upon putting the free coinage 
proposition through. That means the double standard. We 
shall pay each other in silver and our foreign debtors in gold, 
unless, indeed, we resort to the old California method of making 
all contracts in writing, and calling for "United States gold coin," 
as we did during the greenback period. The settling of the silver 
problem still proves to be an international affair. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




THE old year gave us a few tears at parting, as though it sor- 
rowed to take its leave, but the heavy frost which followed 
the rainfall made one rather inclined to regret ihe comparative mild- 
ness of the temperature of the day before, for, though Wednesday 
was clear and the sun shone brightly, there was a sharp chill in the 
air that penetrated to the very marrow of one's bones. Taken alto- 
gether, December was an unusually cold month for San Francisco, 
though, indeed , the whole year gave us fewer warm days than gener- 
ally falls to our lot. Let us hope that 1891 will be more kindly dis- 
posed and be an improvement on 1890. The holidays have caused 
quite a hegira of society people in the direction of Del Monte. Some 
of them went down there in time to include Christmas as well as New 
Year's, though the greater number took in the latter day only. Of 
course. Judge Hoffman was one of the guests, for he seldom fails to 
spend his holidays, at every season of the year, under that roof-tree. 
General, Mrs. and Mns Houghton. Mrs. Tallant, her daughters and 
sons-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Eyre, their daughters and sons-in-law, the 
Otis's, the Bakers, the Casserleys and others that can always be de- 
pended upon, and they also were all there for the New Year dance. 
In fact, the list w.is this vear quite a long one of absentees from town, 
and, as a consequence, the holiday gatherings in the city were neither 
so many nor so well attended as, no doubt, would have been the case 
had it not been the correct thing to be outside its limit at this par- 
ticular time. 

Mrs. Goad's lunch on Saturday afternoon, and the dinner given on 
Saturday evening to Mr. Dan Murphy, at the Pacific-Union Club, 
were both enjoyable affairs. The lunch party was entirely composed 
of ladies; the dinner was a stag one. as a welcome to the guest on his 
return from a lengthened absence abroad. One of the pleasantest 
events of- this week was Mrs. Howard Blanchard Chase's tea at the 
Pleasanton, on Monday last, at which there were an unusual number 
of men present. " More men than women, by jove," as one discon- 
tented fellow, who usually plays the role of belle at such affairs, was 
heard to remark to another of the same ilk. Nearly all the pretty 
girls in town put in their appearance to wish their hostess the com- 
pliments of the season, so who wonders at the men being there also? 
The Pleasanton was the scene of a merry dance New Year's Eve. 
The Concordia Club and the San Francisco Verein each gave their 
annual New Year's Eve balls on Wednesday night, and Mrs. Gus 
Bowie chose that evening for her initial reception of the season. It 
was scarcely a wise one, for though it was a pleasant party, the ab- 
sence of so many of her friends from town was quite noticeable. New 
Year's Eve was also chosen by Miss Etta Tucker for her wedding 
with Mr. George McNear. The ceremony was performed at St. Paul's 
Church, and the reception held at the home of the bride in Oakland, 
both places being beautified with garlands of evergreens, red berries, 
flowers and foliage. The pretty bride was attended by the Misses 
Herrick, McKee. McNear, May and Clara Tucker; the groom by his 
brother, Mr. John McNear, as best man, and the assemblage of 
guests comprised all those best known in Oakland society, and many 
from this ides of the bay also, A Lyons white silk dress, made 
a la court train, entirely hidden by billowy waves of silk muslin, sur- 
rounded the willowy figure of the young bride. To describe it is an 
impossibility. The* effect was of ' extreme simplicity, while a little 
examination gave the idea of fairy work, such as graceful folds, 
rosettes of muslin, and gems of pearls holding them, imperceptible 
pleats covered with fine pearls. The waist wascutlowovera high neck 
corsage of pearl sleeves, Isabeau, of the same work, in reality a frame 
such as the charming young bride deserved. Her beautiful and 
youthful figure was entirely covered by a long veil of silk muslin, 
which, owing to the delicate beauty of the bride, was exceedingly be- 
coming. The honeymoon trip will be made to Europe. 

The third " Friday Evening " cotillion of the season was danced 
at Odd Fellows' Hall last night, of which more extended mention 
must be made next week. But surely among the events of this week 
mention must not be omitted of the Christmas party at Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Crocker's on Tuesday last. It was a family affair, pure 
and simple, all the near relatives having assembled to see the Rev. 
Dr. McKenzie baptize the infant daughter of the host and hostess, 
andjtheir two little nephews, sons of Judge and Mrs. Van Vleit, n&e 
Crocker, which service was performed out of a handsome silver 
Christmas bowl, which Mr. Crocker brought with him from abroad, 
Mrs. Carrie Milzner-Hamilton singing a couple of beautiful selec- 
tions before and after the ceremony. After the names of Florence, 
Clarke and Allen had been respectively bestowed upon the young 
principals of the gathering, breakfast was partaken of by those 
assembled, at which the young Christians were repeatedly toasted. 
The gold and silver cups, spoons and rattlers given the lucky young- 
sters were almost uncountable, and the favors of the breakfast-table 
were miniature golden bathtubs, silver cradles and French doll- 
babies. Christmas Day was the choice made by Miss Grace Sayers 
for her nuptials with Dr. Bliss, and the scene of the ceremony was 
the parlors of the Sayers' residence on Jackson street, which Miss 
Mary Bates had decorated most harmoniously with roses, red berries, 
smilax and other green tendrils. There were neither bridesmaids 
nor groomesmen, and the guests were composed of relatives and 
intimate friends only. After the congratulations which followed the 
wedding blessing, breakfast was served, and in the afternoon the 
happy pair departed for Del Monte to spend the honeymoon. They 
will reside at the Palace Hotel on their return to town." 

The news of the engagements which comes to us from abroad is of 
interest to San Franciscans, from the fact that in each case, one of 
the contracting parties has lived here and during their residence 
been popular members or society. One is thatof Miss Correy. daugh- 
ter of the French Consul at this port, to Mr. Sere de Montpellier. 
which means that the Pacific Coast is not likelv to see her again. The 
other is that of Mr. R. B. Forman, of the house of Balfour Guthrie 



&Co., who was fo%several years one of the most sought after of our 
beaux of British birth, to a Miss Williamson of Liverpool, England. 
It is possible that in this case we shall have the pleasure of making 
the acquaintance ot the bride-elect at some future day. 

Mrs. Maria Bailey's friends are expecting to hear of her marriage 
in Japan to Lieut. Commander Norm, the wedding having been ar- 
ranged to take place the latter part of December, and there is a prob- 
ability of their being able to welcome her in San Francisco some time 
in the Spring. 

The reported engagement of Mr. D. O. Mills to the Marquise de 
Talleyrand, has caused quite a sensation among Mr. Mills' old friends 
and associates on this Coast, where, for so many years, he was num- 
bered as one of the Argonauts. Mr. Mills has always been am- 
bitious to shine in fashionable life, and though the rumor has since 
been faintly denied by the lady, those who profess to know are willing 
to was*er a tolerable amount that the marriage takes place before the 
year is very old. 

A large number are going up to the Inauguration Ball at Sacra- 
mento next week, for which occasion some extra efforts are being 
made to have it a brilliant one, and prayers are offered up daily that 
the weather will prove fine, for a more dismal place during a rain- 
storm than the Capital City cannot be found. 

Miss Susie Tompkins, who has been absent in the East a greater 
part of the past year, has been warmly welcomed home by her nu- 
merous friends, among whom she is such a favorite, and been greatly 
missed while away. 

Mr. Louis T. Haggin has been passing the Christmas holidays with 
his old friends in San Francisco. His talented wife and pretty daugh- 
ter are spending the Winter in Ne w York, which henceforth will be 
their settled home. 

One of the arrivals of the week was Mrs. R. S. Floyd, who brought 
back the remains of her late husband. Capt. Floyd, who died in Phil- 
adelphia, for interment here. The funeral took place on Tuesday 
last from Grace Church, the pall bearers numbering many of his old 
associates, representing the beneficiaries of the Tiust Deed of James 
Lick, of which Capt. Floyd was one of the Trustees. Another sad 
arrival speedily looked for is that of pretty Mrs. Blackwell, me Ruth 
Holladay, who will return to her old home in San Francisco, owing 
to Mr. Blackwell's recent death in England, where they have resided 
since their marriage. Mrs. H. M. A. Miller and Miss Mamie Burling, 
who have gone to Coronado Beach for a visit, intend remaining there 
during the greater part of January. Mr. Will Hearst left for the East 
last week, called thither by the serious illness of his father, Senator 
Hearst, whom recent accounts declare to be improving, news his 
friends here were glad to hear. 

A telegram has been received from Washington announcing the 
wedding, to take place on January 5th, of Miss Mildred Fuller, 
daughterof Chief Justice Fuller, of the U. S. Supreme Court and Hugh 
C. Wallace. Mr. Wallace is a nephew of Judge W. C. Wallace, of 
Napa City, at present residing in Auburn. 

A very pleasant birthday party took place on Christmas eve at 
the residence of Col. William Dunphy on Washington street. It 
has been for years a good custom of Col, Dunphy to entertain his 
friends upon these anniversaries. Among the guests were: General 
Frazer, Judge A. 0. P. Evans, Mr. O'Bierne, Judge Toohey, Judge 
Craig, Mr. Meredith. Mr. Dannie! O'Connell, the well-knownjournal- 
ist and poet, Mr. Frank Commius and other prominent citizens. 
The evening was spent most agreeably in songs, recitations and the 
heartiest of good wishes for the host. Mr. Frank Commins, who 
has a baritone voice, excelled by none and equaled by few, sang 
with great feeling and expression, " Many Happy Returns of the 
Day " and "Oh, Native Music!" beyond comparison. Mr. Com- 
mins' flute-like tones brought tears to the eyes of many. Colonel 
Dunphy's health has been complete!)' restored since he returned, 
anda he is now completely recovered from the injuries he received 
from his trip on the Atlantic. Felix. 

A CARD. 

IN view of the existence of certain rumors, intended to injure 
the standing of Geo. C. Shreve & Co., we are constrained to 
stigmatize the same as false and malicious in every particular. 
No other person has, or has had for the last twenty years, any 
interest in our business except the present members of the firm — 
Geo. C. Shreve, George Bonny and A. J. Lewis. The condition of 
our affairs never was as sound as it is to-day. 

December 31, 1890. Geo. C. Shreve & Co. 



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Jan. 3, 1891. 



$\X FRANCISi NEWS LETTER. 



KITCHEN GARDENS. 
[Bt Vi Vr 

IT would be Impossible lo meiaon the influence that the kinder- 
gttrten system h»s had upon education In general, and in par- 
ticular upon the children of the poor It is tC them that it has 
come with its greatest revelations, with Its gifts and its occupa- 
tions, its gradual development of mind, body and goal. One ofl 
the outgrowths ol this system is what is known as the " kitchen 
garden," or object lessons in household work, including songs, 
plays, exercises and games, illustrating household occupations. 
I designed to teach little children the rudiments of house- 
work in a bright, cheerful way. To little children, all tasks as 
such are irksome, and soon become associated in the child's mind 
with a feeling of weariness and disgust. Play is the natural oc- 
cupation of childhood, and often its fantastic undertakings have 
far more depth and meaning than have the day-dreams or the 
pleasures of their elders. It is by unconscious mimicry that the 
human race learns its first lessons. Was there ever a perfect 
childhood that did not include » playing lady," " keeping house,'' 
and »< making calls?" And what is a little girl's love for her dolls 
but motherhood in miniature? But work, as work, is distasteful. 
"It is time to stop playing now; come into the house and sit 
down to your sewing," is the death-knell of many a child's hap- 
piness for the day, and the signal for needle pricks, bleeding 
fingers, knotted threads and tangled tempers. 

Man is a gregarious animal. In other words, he likes a crowd. 
He revels in the movement of the mass, and instead of losing 
himself as the individual, the atom, he takes on the increased 
importance of the multitude. He is one of many; he is a part 
of the whole, and his being throbs with the pulsation of the 
host. The child is the man in embryo. When was there a 
healthy child, unless it was a stupid dolt, or a little mind super- 
sensitive over its real or fancid backwardness, who preferred 
private lessons at home to the magnetic attraction of the school- 
room, and the exciting comradeship of the playground? Happy 
indeed are the children of this generation that hearts warm with 
the red life-blood of human sympathy, have thought out for them 
the first problem of life's lesson of work, and have come to the 
delightful conclusion that children together may be taught to work 
as if it were but play. To the honor of our sex, that solution 
was worked out, as far as it has reference to household occupa- 
tions, by a woman, Emily Huntington of New York. How came 
she to develop this special idea? This is her testimony: 

" I spent hours of thought by day and by night, when I came to really live 
among the poor of New York city. How prematurely old the little faces 
that gathered around roe looked, how puzzled and how anxious over eveiy 
task, and yet how bravely those tasks were performed when explained and 
understood! How uncomplaiugly they toiled, and yet how evident was 
their disgust at the toil, and how it was hurried through to be ready for 
the play-time. Poor little children, must they always do what they hate?" 
A visit to a kindergarten gave Miss Huntington her inspira- 
tion. In a moment her fancy painted her poor children seated at 
the same long kindergarten tables, setting little tables, washing 
little dishes, all the time listening to corrections and suggestions 
from kind teachers. What happy little faces 1 work had become 
play and the instruments of toil were playthings! Such the 
picture that her imagination painted, and her book was the 
materialization of the idea, which can be put in practice in an 
ordinary school-room, although the arrangement of a kinder- 
garten hall is the best of all. The inaugurator of this idea 
declares that a piano and teachers, with enthusiastic and mag- 
netic natures, who shall come to their classes with faces fresh 
and bright, are indispensable. 

As has been demonstrated time and again, for the poor the 
cost of living is almost double by their ignorance of quality, their 
lack of method and their consequent waste of material. How 
are they to learn practical economy of time, labor, and material? 
By teaching the children of the poor what is the best way. In such 
a noble endeavor are engaged a brave band of young ladies who have 
dedicated their Saturday mornings to the cause of the Kitchen Gar- 
den among the poor in this city. They took lessons from a teacher as 
to the proper methods of procedure, and started their charitable 
enterprise in the Sunday school room of Grace Church. Later, 
through the kindness of Dr. B. H. McDonald, they were enabled 
to use the Silver Star Kindergarten rooms on the corner of San- 
some and Broadway, free of charge. This carried their laudable 
endeavor among the very portion of the city where such mission- 
ary effort would be most needed and appeciated. Their house- 
keeping and sewing classes now number about fifty scholars, all 
freely taught over the age of six. Among the young ladies in- 
terested in the work are Misses Lina and Bettie Ashe, Mrs. Dr. 
Breyfogle, Misses Alice Griffith, Lucia Kittle, Jessie Newlands, 
Sallie Maynard, Anna Head, Mary Eyre, Nina Macondray, May 
Hoffman, and J. McAllister. Music plays an important part in 
the course of the exercises, for all the occupations are -performed 
to merry and taking tunes, with words expressive of the work to 
be accomplished. The instruction begins at the very foundation, 
with wood, its uses, its merits as compared with coal, the best 
kinds to burn, how to keep wood-work clean. It shows that 
wood should always be scrubbed with the grain, and that wooden 
utensils will absorb strong odors and flavors, communicating 
them toother articles with which they may come in contact. In 



Uon with wood, a lesson \v frlvtn in stiek-lnyinu, tell 
Idren where not to loretefa metoheti and how to ipltl kind- 

Od and how to !.iv i\ lire BO thai It will burn. Then a 

oonree ol paper folding Leacnei them how t.. told garments and 
napcry neatly. Then cornea table-eetting;, teaching each child the 
oae ol t'Vrry article of the service, where each article should in- 
placed, and why such arrangements an the best. That no time 
may be lost In actual work, the class is taught to clean the 
kitchen dishes as Boon ns the meal is served. Bed-making with 
its indispensable airings of the bed-clothes, the beating op of pil- 
lows and mattrasses, even to the proper placing of the sheet 
regards hems. Is all explained, being performed by the children 
with the cunningest little outfit of niimvture household furniture 
imaginable. A sweeping lesson teaches all the details of cleaning 
a room, even to the time for dusting the rounds of a chair. It 
also shows how to care for the broom and the brushes. Every 
step" in the weekly wash is carefully and understanding^ taken ; 
and with question and answer the children are taught bow to 
make the clothes look their best and to keep them from harm. 
Other lessons instruct them in the art of answering the door, in 
carrying a message, of waiting on the table, of holding a tray, of 
molding bread, cake, biscuits. Pictures of animals are dis- 
tributed, and the children taught by the kindergarten method of 
pricking points with a pin, what are the portions of the animals 
best suited for consumption and for the varied culinary results. 
Sewing lessons are not forgotten, the children make the little gar- 
ments, which they use in the lessons to illustrate the different 
stages of the work. And they do enjoy it so 1 On the last Fri- 
day of December, the Kitchen Garden held its Christmas festival, 
at which the happy children gave several of their exercises. They 
were then made the recipients of useful presents which had been 
contributed by the generous friends of the school. A bountiful 
spread of ice cream, cake and candy, finished the programme, 
and satisfaction reigned supreme. 



Whether it now rains for forty days and nights, we have certainly 
had enough of dry weather to suit the most fastidious. If the rain 
should continue, there will be more people than usual finding their 
way to the Grand Central "Wine Rooms, 16-18 Third street, for the 
purpose of fortifying their systems against the cold, by means of the 
excellent drinks to be had there. 



He is happy whose circumstances suit his temper, but he excels 
more who can suit his temper to his circumstances ; but thrice happy 
he who, feeling the necessity of recuperating the inner man, can be- 
take himself to enjoy a dinner such as is served at the Original 
Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. 

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All druggists keep it, or will order it for their 
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Mrs. GRAHAM, " Beauty Doctor," 103 Post St., 
treats Ladies for all blemises or defects of form or 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

WHEN the dramatic interest at the theatres slackens, and 
»< second weeks " are the rule, the philosophic theatre-goer — 
and all men become philosophers when solitude in a crowd gives 
the occasion— is wont to find a scarcely secondary interest in 
watching the audience. To be sure the tragedies and comedies 
going on in front of the footlights are less easy to follow, owing 
to the ancient stage custom of wearing masks having been rele- 
gated to the audience in our day. But these are lifted now and 
then inadvertently, and the keen observer catches in a fleeting 
glimpse enough to reveal plot and soliloquy, and to afford a guess 
at the denouement. 

# » # 

la the pretty smile of the girl sitting yonder, in white wrappings 
and pink turban, a real spontaneous outburst of heart-sunshine, 
or are the pearly teeth and dimpling cheeks only a mask worn 
over a sore and wounded heart, or one filled with the meaner pas- 
sions of envy, jealousy, malice and all uncharitableness? Is that 
new and perfectly fitting dress-coat really what it seems — the 
pride and joy of the debonair spirit within, or does it cover only a 
burning sense that it isn't paid for? And that broad, white shirt- 
front so lavishly displayed yonder — its snowy expansiveness a 
glossy smile in itself — does it cover a satisfied breast,- or a com- 
plaining stomach, filled only with a craving to be filled by some 
chance invitation to an after-theatre supper? Does the yearning, 
anxious glance Madame in the furs and diamonds, over there, 
sends after her Charles or John, as be goes out between acts, 
merely the fond, wifely longing for his quick coming back, or 
does it but half hide the pallid fear that he " goes out " for the 
same purpose, not only at the theatre, but elsewhere, all too 
often? Who can tell? But the shrewd observer waits for some 
unconscious moment in which the mask is lifted, pieces out his 
observation with shrewder guesses, and so gets a » new produc- 
tion " out of an old play. The spoony couple of young lovers, 
who come to the theatre because it is so sweet to be alone in a 
crowd together, and who watch the play with interest only as it 
presents their special phase of emotion, is always there. They 
wear no mask, though the girl generally thinks she does, and 
every one likes to have them there, and hopes the poetry may 
last for them a little longer than usual. 

• * * 

The woman who brings her baby is seldom in the audience now- 
adays. With the dying out of the strong domestic feeling which 
we lament, has gone one of its small disabilities, and the wild yell 
of an affrighted infant no longer breaks forth at the ravings and 
lunges of high tragedy, making the poor tragedian feel that his 
best point has been turned into low comedy for the audience. 

# * * 

Perhaps, however, no one of the exhibitions of real life in the 
audience so absorbs the attention of the spectator, to the utter ex- 
clusion of life's counterfeit presentment on the stage, as the tall 
hat in front of him, and his intense wonder is whether its wearer 
will be carried out in a fit, will fall dead or be smitten with sud- 
den fire from heaven, or whether eternal justice sleeps above as 
below. He moves to the right; the hat is right, for once — to the 
left, and gets left, as before. There is no escaping the tall hat at 
the theatre. It is the one ill of life that you are justified in allow- 
ing to exclude from your sight and mind everything else in earth 
and heaven, because you can't help yourself. 

* * * 

But this takes the subject out of the realm of philosophy. No 
man and no woman is a philosopher when seated behind the tall 
hat at the theatre. 

* » # 

Sometimes, however, Nature tries her hand with the milliner, 
and creates a man who is bound to be an " obstructionist," in spite 
of himself. An amusing illustration of this fact occurred some 
years ago in a Buffalo theatre during a very important engage- 
ment. The house was densely packed Vhen a man somewhat 
above ordinary height walked down the aisle, found his seat near 
the front row of the parquet, and, instead of sitting down, re- 
mained apparently standing in his place. Those behind waited 
for a time, and then came an impatient « sit down," from some 
one. This soon increased to a chorus of -'sit down," "down in 
front," " get down," etc., etc. ; but without the slightest effect or 
even seeming to attract the notice of the object. The curtain 
fell in time to prevent further demonstration, and the " obstruc- 
tionist " walked out with the crowd, not so distinguishable from 
the rest in height as to attract much notice. When he returned, 
however, and continued his objectionable perpendicularity, pa- 
tience ceased to be a virtue. "Sit down!" "Sit down, you there!" 
and so on, was varied with "if he won't sit down, knock him 
down!" "Put him out!" and at last the menacing roar attract- 
ing the wonder of the stander, he began to feel that he was the 
object of wrath. Rising to his feet (the act seeming to increase 



his height but very slightly) he solemnly remarked: "Gentlemen, 
I rise to prove to^you that I am sitting down." With which par- 
adoxical explanation he reseated himself and order reigned, the 
crowd realizing that it would be, perhaps, an extreme measure to 
prove at the top a man whose short legs and abnormally long 
body were the sole cause of the misunderstanding, and for which 
he could hardly be held responsible. 

# # # 

The second week of The Private Secretary at the Baldwin has 
been about as well attended as the first, there having been the 
usual grand influx toward the end of an engagement of tbe 
chronic procra&tinators who have to take advantage of the last 
night to see a popular play. The Juch Opera Company, which 
opens with The Flying Dutchman next Monday evening, is "to 
run greatly to Vawgner " as Manager Bouvier says ; and, in this 
fact, our opera-goers find a great interest in the coming season. 
The Wagner cult has become so extended in musical-resthetic 
circles in the East that our connoisseurs cannot afford to be out 
of it altogether. Many do now, more will learn to, and most of all 
will pretend to, love the grand composer; and in the Juch season 
they will have their opportunity. The first week's repertory is 
as follows: Monday, The Flying Dutchman; Tuesday, Faust; Wed- 
nesday, Lohengrin; Thursday, II Trovatore; Friday, Les Huguenots; 
Saturday matinee, Rigoletto; Saturday evening, Carmen. 

m » • 

A coming Baldwin attraction is "AH the Comforts of Home." 
A striking photograph of three remarkably pretty girls adorns the 
Baldwin office, and the three bright young faces belong to "All 
the Comforts of a Home." Manager Bouvier, as a conservative 
married man, professes not to know their names ; but if looks are 
not deceiving, the susceptible young unmarried men of San Fran- 
cisco will not long be equally ignorant. A staid Philadelphia 
paper speaks of this play as "clean, wholesome and bright; 
amusing without vulgarity, and just the thing for a merry even- 
ing's amusement." 

# # # 

Will S. Hays, the song writer, has announced his determination 
to put on the stage and the road " an old-time minstrel com- 
pany." That's the idea. There is no question that a oona-fide 
minstrel "show" without any "Castillians " or "Venetians," 
without Senors or Toreadors, or any interloping interpolations 
whatsoever, would meet a rousing welcome. The unpopularity 
of minstrel shows has gone on increasing since negro minstrelsy 
began to grow too big for its old plantation trowsers. 

# # * 

Another "handsomest theatre in all the world" is being built — 
on paper. This time it is for Marcus Mayer, and is to be located 
somewhere near Fifteenth street and Fifth Avenue, New York. 
Marcus claims to have caught a $25,000,000" angel," who will do 
the "heavy work," id est, the financial. 

# * * 

The scene of Hoyt's new play, A Texas Steer, {marked to appear 
at the California) is laid principally in Washington, the story 
tracing the career of a Congressman at the Capital. Maverick 
Brander is said to rank as a dramatic creation with Bardwell 
Slote and Colonel Sellers. 

» # # 

The Hess Opera Company continues to keep the prestige it has 
won by its merits. Signor Guille has recovered from his late in- 
disposition, to the great delight of his numerous admirers. 

# * * 

Miss Marie Barnard, the well-known San Franciscan soprano, 
who lately went East to join the Mendelssohn Quintette Club of 
Boston, sang lately in Minneapolis, where, we learn, she made 
" a decided hit," and was repeatedly " called before the curtain." 
Miss Barnard owes her excellent method, as well as much of the 
evenness of her voice, to her only instructor, Madame Julie Eose- 
wald, of this city. 

# # # 

The luck of M. B. Curtis, Sam'l of Posen, of Peralta Park, Cal., 
seems to be deserting him. The New York dramatic papers re- 
port as the "only shipwreck" among the Thanksgiving week 
productions, that of The Schatchen at the People's Theatre, for 
which, it will be remembered, Mr. Curtis had been " specially en- 



Helen Dauvray is quoted as saying that she will start her next 
touring season under new management, and with " three plays 
instead of one," so that, in case of one proving a failure, she will 
have " two others to fall back upon." Wise precautions; and 
why not three managers as well, to meet a similar contingency? 

• # # 

The French composer, Widor, has been ennobled by the Pope. 
Well, Wldors have always been great favorites with the Popes. 

# * # 

A " musical novel," by Ossip Schubin (Lola Kirschner) has for 
its title " Asbein." If this is the name of hero or heroine, Lola 
should not have been at a loss for a model from life. The 'As-beens 
on the operatic stage are a host in themselves. 



Jar 



PAN 



NEWS LETTER. 



V 



dmm that Mtvogvmenta h i ■■ d made w itii M la Moon 

Jull«| At tht* Bush BIllDg f.»r OOQ 

week tn b*h»lf of thi* iacce»fful i Iltns, William* and folly. 

The s»le^ of Mala f'»r the third week ->f Kb In prosparotu tnguje* 
m«nt already fully justify tba vrisd nn -f loo Busb i tree I n 
merit in making (hi.« extension ol Unie, 

# • 

The California has been entertaining an undiminished crowd 
QJghtij with the varied programme presented by thfl Boston 
Howard Atbemeum Oompeny. Cinqueveill baa Introduced >w- 
eral new feature* Into his man s«ry it diablerie (which- 

ever it i?i nn>i the other hworltea have pm n liul? new business 
into their specialties to the continued satisfaction of their audi- 
ences. Their last performance will in- glren Sunday night 

Little TAtrd Fauntlerotj comes t«> the California Monday night 
for a two weeks' stay. The little lord will be personated :il 
ternately by 'iertie I Ionian an. I Georgia Hooper. The little 
ladies have been found far more satisfactory than boys in the 
sympathetic role of the queer, but lovable little child-man of 
Mrs. Burnett's Story. A sympathetic critic says of Lord Faun- 
tUmtj : >> Winsome and lovely throughout, it is probably the best 
child's part ever written." Little Gertie llo'man, the Lord 
Fauntleroy, is quite a famous little actress, having created the 
part of Mignon in liootlc.<' linhy. The bright little alternate, 
fieorgie Cooper, is the daughter of Georgie Woodthorpe, of this 
city. 

# » * 

The last Pacbmann recital took place at Irving Hall on Monday 
evening last. The audience was probably the largest of the sea- 
son, and if it fell a little below previous onts in point of demon- 
strative enthusiasm, it made up for this in a flatteringly earnest 
and critical attention. The programme, like that at Saturday's 
matinee, was a varied one, selections being given from Mendels- 
sohn, Beethoven, Bach, von Weber and Raff, with only the last 
three numbers from Chopin. The question of M. de Pacbmann's 
possibilities and limitations seems pretty well settled to the satis- 
faction of our best musical critics, most of whom hold that while 
the soul of the excitable and eccentric pianist may be more in 
unison with that of his favorite composer, yet he is an equally 
adequate interpreter of the other great composers — that he is, in 
truth, a master, not of a school, but of music. One very eminent 
pianist, however, makes a single exception, though of course only 
to a certain extent. This authority thinks that Pachmann has 
hot entirely caught the spirit of Beethoven. Be this criticism, 
however, well founded or otherwise, certain it is that in the piano 
recitals of Vladimir de Pachmann, San Francisco has had a season 
not only of rare musical enjoyment, but of a still rarer musical 
development. 

# # * 

An exciting race on skates formed the chief entertainment for 
the non-skaters at the Pavilion Tuesday night. Frank Delmont 
{a Londoner), J. A. Snowden, the " World's Champion," and Mr. 
Walstein, entered for the $200 prize in the two-mile race, Tuesday 
night. Waldstein fell out, Snowden came in first with Delmont 
close on his heels. Time: First mile, 3:10; two miles, 6:21£. 

# * * 

Visitors to the city will find an hour or two well and pleasantly 
spent at the Panorama of Gettysburg and museum attached, 
corner Tenth and Market. Parents can hardly give their young 
people a more appropriate treat during the school holidays. As 
an illustrated page of our natio'n's history, this exhibition is 
worth study. 

# # # 

The Baldwin patrons are soon to have a season of genuine en- 
joyment, on a somewhat novel plane, in All the Comforts of Howe. 
The play has excited the universal praise of the Eastern critics, 
and the bright people in it are as highly commended. The Phila- 
delphia Record says: " All the Comforts of Home could scarcely be 
improved upon; it is amusing without vulgarity and makes no 
drafts upon faculties already wearied with the cares of life. The 
cast is so uniformly .excellent that there is no need to particu- 
larize." 

L. R. Stockwell of the Alcazar management takes a benefit at 
that theatre Monday night when, " by general request," The Mag- 
istrate will be produced. The rest of the week, Her Atonement will 
be played at the Alcazar, beginning Tuesday night. 

# * * 

Russell's Comedians, including the " bright, particular star of 
comedy," Fay Templeton, open an engagement at the Califor- 
nia, January 10th, in the latest sensation from the Comedie Fran- 
caiae, Miss McQinty. San Francisco will be glad that Charlie Reed 
has been substituted for Sydney Drew in the cast for the Califor- 
nia tour. 

# * » 

The scenes in The Clemenceau Case have been photographed. It 
must have been by the "flash" light process. 



anouncomenta in a Int. per followed 

ither in this unfortunately suggestive ordor : ■■ Mrs, Brow n 
Potter and Kvrh- Bellow .«- Romeo and Juliet'*— «-A I 
tacles." 

• • • 

Ed. Btevens, the former TWoli favorite, baa signed tor another 
two yai> :it the New V.. r k Casino, and i- said t<- be greatly 
pleased at hi* past success and present prospects. 

• ■ • 

Emanuel Mario, one of the most famous >>f operatic conduct- 
ors, died in Paris recently at the age «.f fifty seven. 

Mrs. Julia MelviHe-SnyrJer, the most successful <>r teachers In 
elocution and vocalisation, continues her lessons t<> pupils as muai, 
at her studio, 138 McAllister street. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Mil Ai„ limns, Lessee and Proprietor | Bin. Alfred Bodvikr, Mnuagcr. 
Last Matinee, Saturday at 2, Lasl performance Saturday evening, 
THE PRIVATE SECRETARY. 
Monday next, January - r >lh, 

EMHA .IHII UKASD I \(.l IM1 oi'i:ra COMPANY. 
Kepertoir: Monday, Till-; FLYING DUTCHMAN— "Senta," MissJuch. 
ruesday.FAnsr. Wednesday, LOHKNi;KIN-"Klsa," MissJuch Thurs- 
day IL MOVATORE. Friday, LBS HUGUENOTS—" Valentine," Miss 
Jnco. Saturday Matinee, tllUoLETTO. Saturday Evcuiug, CAHMEN— 
■t annen, ' Miss Jnch. seats umv no sale. 

FitiCEs-Oreheslra and Dress Circle. *2: Balcony, l'rout Row (reserved) 
H .i0; B alcony, other Rows, (reserved) ft ; Boxes, *luand »20; Gallery, 50 els. 

NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M.B. Lbavitt... Lessee aud Proprietor | J.J. Gottxob Manager 

GUS WILLIAMS 
Last week! and 

JOHN T. KELLY, 
All new Features, Songs, Dauces and Music. 
Matiuees Wednesday and Saturday. 



"U & I" 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre iu the World. 

Mr. Al H a yman, Lessee aud Proprietor | Mr. Harry Mann Manager 

Last Week. Matinee Saturday. The Great 

BOSTON HOWARD ATHEN>£UM CO. 
Nest Monday, LITItE I.OKD FAUHiTUEROY, with special New 
York Cast. Seats now on Sale. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreung Bros Proprietors and Managers 

To-night! First appearance of J. C. Howe, in his daring Aerial Ring Act. 
THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 

To-night! Prof. Leon's Singing Donkeys and Baby Elephant. Bennett & 
Rasom, Wonderful Leapers. 
Popular Prices » 25c. and 50c. 



THE OLYMPIAN CLUB ROLLER SKATING RINK, 

(Entire Mechanics' Pavilion), 

5,000 pairs of the Latest Roller Skates. 60,000 square feet of New Maple 
Surface. 

Afternoon and Evenings. Saturday, Grand Fete Night. Skating Morn- 
ing and Afternoon, Special Monster Holiday Programme. 

The Most Novel and Interesting Entertainment. 

" THE CALIFORNIA. 

Strictly European Plan. Absolutely Fire-proof, 

OPENED DECEMBER 1, 1890. 

The only hotel in San Francisco that has sun in rooms entire day. This 
is the only strictly first-class hotel in the city. Magnificent appointments. 
Unparalleled in beauty and brilliancy. Unquestionably the most beautful 
and luxuriously furnished hotel in America. Rooms en suite with baths 
of latest exposed sanitary plumbing. Electric lights throughout. Every 
convenience for comfort of guests. Most centrally located, being in the 
midst of amusements, art galleries, shops aud other places of interest. 

Its cuisine is of a peculiar excellence. The best and handsomest Res- 
taurant in the city. Service perfect. Half portions served. 

Rooms $1 per day and upwards. 

HORD & KINZLER, Managers. 



Seven Sutherland Sisters' 

SCALP CLEANER 

Is the only Dandruff Cure. For 
Shampooing it has no equal. 

Prices— Hair Grower, $1. Six 
bottles for$5. Scalp Cleaner, 50c. 

For sale by the Seven Suther- 
land Sisters aud all Druggists. 

Seven Sutherland Sisters, Sole 
Manufacturers aud Proprietors, 
83C Market St., aau Francisco, Cal. 

Main Office, 18 West Fourteenth 
street, New York. 

No charge to see the Seven Sutherland sisters. 




Consultation free. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




SO " Stokes, me boy," is looming up as a » bachelor in cham- 
bers." How very swell and » English, you know.'' We hear 
that be has lately come into a fortune, which, no doubt, he will 
" blow in " with all speed, judging from the way he got rid of his 
ducats before, for be it known, according to Mr. James-Brett, 
himself, he was once a wealthy man, and did things up in great 
shape, financially, until one fine day he awoke to find himself 
"busted." II is very amusing to hear him tell of his visit at 
Carlsbad, where he went to take the waters for the good of his 
muchly abused liver. Judging by the way he continues to treat 
that organ, we think another trip to that same Spa will be an- 
nounced in the near future. We mark the beautiful and com- 
placent way in which this person drops people when they are no 
longer useful to him. He is a great snob, and although tolerated 
by a select few, he has been dropped out where he most desired 
to remain, and even though he will find plenty of people to ac- 
cept his hospitality, he would not be greatly flattered to hear the 
private opinions expressed of him behind his back; perhaps none 
of ua would, for the matter of that. 

* # # 

Another snob is that long-legged anatomy called " Jack," and a 
veritable Jack he is, judging by his asinine propensities; he too 
has a way of using people as long as they will stand it, and only 
the wealthy are honored by his acquaintance; of brains he has 
none, save those he carries in his seven-league boots; he poses 
for a " born aristocrat," which he is not; the stock be really comes 
from we will not here record out of consideration for his sister, 
who is really a charming girl; he has a "little" brother who 
might be taken for the " missing link," but to say he had ances- 
tors, even of so old a state as the genus ape, would be paying him 
too high a compliment. 

*r * * 

MoTragi, the Count, is not dead, he has only grown a beard 
which has so changed his classic beauty as to have made him un- 
recognizable by those who "sighed like a furnace " under the 
melting deliciousness of his aristocratic Italian moustache. 

* * # 

Once upon a time a little red-haired tom-boy girl, with fat legs, 
used to run up and down Tehama street, between First and 
Second, in the neighborhood of " Tar Flat," in utter defiance 
of the commands of a fat granny and a lank mamma, 
who used to hang themselves over the gate that led to their 
aristocratic red-brick front habitation; papa, also, had a fash- 
ion of smoking his pipe in his shirt-sleeves in the same peace- 
ful way over the gate, while brother Bill " sassed " the neighbors 
or went to school. Now, although this family did not mingle 
with our Four Hundred in those days, mamma was just as fond 
of a racket as many of our swell ladies of to-day are, and she 
quite cut out two sisters, living opposite, in the affections of a 
very fast dashing broker, who was as fresh in his cheek as a 
newly blown bud. These maidens, possessing the eupho- 
nious names of " Kitty " and » Ketura," sent the fickle broker a 
cream pie that had been all around the horn. He had it pho- 
tographed, but the comparison for softness was so crashing that 
he immediately transferred his affections, temporarily, upon the 
giddy black-eyed matron in the brick-front house, who used to 
enjoy tete-a-tete luncheons with him at old Martin's Restaurant, 
on Sacramento street, up-stairs. 

* * # 

Time has passed since then, and the red-haired bud has grown 
up, and Mamma has grown steadier. Europe has been done, and 
now, as they look out of their bay windows upon Van Ness 
avenue, they forget Tehama street and its associations. They are 
now "in the swim," and snub those who knew them in former 
times. Perhaps, when the daughter marries, some one will be 
unkind enough, by way of giving her a " send-off," to recount to 
the Four Hundred, wherein she is now a shining light, the inter- 
esting history of this soi-disant aristocratic family, and that will 
prove how very exclusive (?) our best society is after all. 

The chief feature of the French exhibition, which has been a 
popular resort in London for several months, has been the Wild 
East Show. Earls-Court, Kensington, has grown quite accustomed 
to the draped forme of the stately Arab and muscular Abyssinian 
and the sound of their guttural tongue. The sensation of the 
Wild East Show, however, is the lion tamer, M. Darling, who has 
evidently proved himself a darling to the hearts of susceptible 
women. But the story that is rSpandu in the Clubs just now is 
that his most recent conquest is the beautiful Lady Colin Camp- 
bell, who it will be remembered figured in a most exciting divorce 
caBe a few years ago. She has been most constant in her attend- 
ance upon Mr. Darling's heroic performances. Perhaps it would 
be only fair to her to explain that he is young and most distin- 
guished in appearance and in his dress of a French cavalry officer 
does not suggest anything of the showman. I am told that this 



fascinating woman is a very thorn in the side of a certain American 
who surprised hm family not so long ago by marrying a noble- 
man who was one of the co-respondents in the Colin Campbell 
case, and who still finds the divorcee irresistible when he is near 
her. However, his wife knew what she was about when she 
married a man with an international reputation, and being inde- 
pendent she can always leave him when she chooses for a visit 
to the States or a few monlhs on the Riviera. 

# * * 

So the divine Sara is to delight American eyes and ears with 
her version of La Tosca and Sardou's Cleopatra. What a run 
there has been upon the Egyptian Queen since Mrs. Potter's pro- 
duction of a year and a half ago. The next Cleopatra in the held 
will be Mrs. Langtry, with Charles Coghlan as the fickle Antony. 
Sardou's play is little more than a spectacle. Except when Sara 
or Gamier, with his atrocious accent, are on the boards, it is very 
flat. Gamier is physically a superb Marc Antony. He is ad- 
mirably made up. Nature has given him exquisitely classic 
features, and with his gray-tinged hair in close, short waves 
against his fine head, he looks the typical Roman of history. The 
Bernhardt is not waning. Her powers are as great as ever, and 
she gives more beauty to Sardou's lines than they possess in- 
trinsically. As usual, her costumes are marvels of richness and 
beauty. One gown of silver tissue is sown with jewels, which 
are entirely lost to any one not using an opera glass. She has her 
nails, both of toes and fingers, stained with henna, and her hands 
are laden with jewels in quaint square and oblong settings. Her 
death is tragic enough, and it is a living serpent she thrusts into 
her breast. Unlike other Cleopatras, she does not tear open her 
draperies, but, having thrust the venomous reptile against her 
breast, she draws the folds of her bodice over him, clutching 
them tightly with one hand, a far more natural action. The love 
scenes between Bernhardt and Gamier are, as usual, aggressive 
on her part, receptive on his. 

• # * 

I never see Gamier without thinking of one night when Bern- 
hardt was being benefited in the Baldwin Theatre. The play 
was Ernani. In a stage-box sat several of the most exclusive 
of the Nob Hill faction — guests of the pretty blonde wife and 
the swarthy husband, who represent the life and spirit of the 
taciturn household. At the close of the second act — if I mistake 
not — Hernani holds the stage alone. Transported by his ap- 
pearance or his eloquence — die lo sa — the vivid blonde leaned 
from her place and flung at Garnier's feet the huge bunch of La 
France roses, which had been occupying the ledge of the box in 
full sight of the audience. When the curtain was raised every 
eye sought the flowers. The actor, with better taste than the 
society woman, had placed them on a table — their dark stems and 
leaves toward the audience — so that they were scarcely discern- 
able. The lady was covered with confusion, and before Gamier 
re-appeared her husband led her from the theatre. I was told 
that the drive home was enlivened by animated conversation, so 
rare a thing in married life. 



B 



U Y Jos. Tetley & Co.'s " Elephant " brand of Ceylon and In- 
dia Teas in lead packets. Unadulterated, fragrant, delicious. 



Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 




FILS', 



LUZE & 

(BORDEAUX) 
St. Estephe, Pontet Canet, Chat. Margaux, 



Pauillac, 

Brown Cantenac, 

St. Julien, 



Chat. Leoville, 
Chat. Larose, 
Chat. Paveil, 



Chat. Beychevelle, 
Chat. Montrose, 
Chat. Lafite. 



FINE SAUTERNES, 

Sauternes Sup'r., Haut Sauternes, Chateau Yquem 

In Cases, Quarts and Pints. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 314 Sacramento Street. 



Jan. 



.-AN FRANCIS* NEWS 1 ETTER. 



THE RAILROADS. 

SHARin h»ve b**n prrparnl showing, bygrou] 
Ibe mileage of track laid on extensions of Itoftm rntlwnj linn 

in the I'nitol Suite.* upon which r. cut ir trains arc to OS run to do 
business as common Mrrtera • >( both freight ami pftMongnr traitli 
lor the calendar year ol 1891. v i ortlng loth! BgoTM praMnted, 
the total addition to Iha country's railway mllMga batwaen Janu- 
ary 1. 1880, and January 1. 1801, « .i* marly 8,800 miles, or aboo.1 
T'«i miles re than was laid In 1880. The tola] amount ol rail- 
way completed January I. 1891, la 167,178; ■■( Ibis amount 86,913 
miles, or over '.'.' per. rent., has been constructed during the last 
Ave years. The following table slows by groups ol Slates the 
mileage of track laid during the last four years: 

New England 

Middle . OB 

Ccutral Northern I.7S1 

South Atlanlle 

Doll and Mississippi Valley S.SS 

Northwestern 8,144 

I'acllle 991 



I8SS 


l S89. 


1890. 


l^J 


SO 


'..J 


an 




- 


an 




701 


1.147 




1,375 


1.W0 


Bl 


8S4 


775 


7m. 


978 


929 


(.04 


634 



ToUl 






6,67'J 



A fortnight since it was telegraphed from Houston that the 
Houston and Texas Central Railway would be taken from the 
bands of the receivers and turned over to the stockholders. It is 
now stated that the money behind the stockholders is put up by 
C. I*. Huntington, who is now looking at the line. Mr. Hunting- 
ton has been offered a controlling interest of the road on low 
terms, and with a thirty days' option. It is pretty definitely 
settled that he will take the property and make it one of the main 
feeders of the Southern Pacific. He has owned stock in the 
Houston and Texas Central for a number of years, and of late 
has shown a disposition to acquire the major portion of it. A 
prominent railway official, interviewed here to-day, had no doubt 
that the road would belong to Huntington before February. He 
also said that there would be no change in the present staff. The 
decision of Judge Pardee makes it necessary for Huntington to 
take possession of the road from Receiver Dillingham within the 
next thirty days, and the paralleling of their line by the Missouri, 
Kansas and Texas from Denison to Dallas breaks their freight 
agreement, and makes it necessary for them to have a line north 
and through the coal field. 

Articles of incorporation have been filed for the Seattle, Spo- 
kane Falls, Boise and Salt Lake Railroad Company. The capital 
stock is placed at $20,000,000, of which about $1,500,000 has been 
subscribed. The papers filed only include such part of the road 
as will be within the State, commencing at a point near Lewis- 
ton, on the northwest, and running through the Seven Devils 
Copper Mining country to Welser, Fayette, Boise, Mountain- 
home, to a point between the towns of Kelton and Kelso on the 
Utah line. Articles of incorporation have been filed in Utah for 
its continuance southeast to Salt Lake City and in the State of 
"Washington from its line to Puget Sound. It is intended that 
this shall be a transcontinental road, but no action will be taken 
in that direction until its completion between Seattle and Salt 
Lake City. The road will be run through the richest agricultural 
region on the Pacific Slope, Northwest Idaho and Eastern Wash- 
ington. 



The Railway Review says: u The Clear Lake and Northern Pa- 
cific R. Co. has been formed. The Directors are Marshall Arnold, 
of Lakeport; W. T. Wheatly, P. 0. Galpin, and W. G. Zeigler, all 
three of San Francisco; and F. H. Long, of Lake county. The 
line will be from Hoplands, or more definitely, from Squaw's 
Rock, eight miles above Cloverdale, to Lakeport, a distance of 
twenty-five miles. Twenty-two thousand dollars has been sub- 
scribed toward the building of the road, and the President of the 
Woodland Bank has promised to subscribe $18,000 more. The 
Lake county subsidy asked for is $40,000. The surveys for the 
line have been made by Edward Dexter, formerly engineer with 
the Santa Fe Co. 



The following is given in the Archiv fur Eisenbahnwesen as the 
railway mileage at the beginning of 1889: Europe, 133,900; 
America, 190,000; Asia, 17,800; Africa, 5,200: Australia, 10,500; 
total, 357,400, as compared with 293,000 in 1884. Of the increase 
of 64,000 miles during the four years, 40,000 is in America, and 
30,000 in the United States alone; 11,000 miles were opened in 
1885, 17,000 in 1886, 23,000 in 1887, and 13,000 in 1888. 

The Atchinson statement for October including the St. Louis 
and San Francisco shows gross earnings, $4,227,537; increase, 
$399,830; net earnings, $1,564,228; decrease, $111,362. 

The first electrical railway in Sweden has been completed. It 
is situated at the Boxholm Iron Foundry and works capitally. 
The whole installation has only cost £750, of which the locomo- 
tive absorbed £390. It is worked through dynamos already in 
use for the electric light, which accounts for its cheapness. 



f.,775 






Macintoshed Coats! 



-AMD 

CLOCKS 

FOB LADIES AMI (.1 N I 1.1 M 1 N 



GOODYEAR RUBBER CO 



557 and 559 Market Street, San Francisco. 

~~ BOX COATS! ~~ 

The Newest Style in Fall Jackets. 

Box Coats trimmed with Astrachan, 
Box Coats trimmed with Bear, 
Box Coats trimmed with Beaver, 
Box Coats trimmed with Krimmer, 
Box Coats trimmed with Lynx, 

Box Coats trimmed with Marten, 
Box Coats trimmed with Mink, 

Box Coats trimmed with Nutria, 

Box Coats trimmed with Persian, 
Box Coats trimmed with Seal, 

Box Coats trimmed with Fitch. 



FRATINGER'S, 

THE 

Leading Cloak and Suit House, 

105 Kearney Street. 

ART NOVELTIES ! 



For tasty Wedding-presents and select Christ- 
mas Gifts, call and inspect Gump's new import- 
ations of Foreign and American Artists'-proof 
Etchings, Water - colors and Goupil's latest 
Novelties. Also a various selection of imported 
Wares, as Crown Derby, Carlsbad Sevres, Royal 
Dresden, Royal Worcester, Hungarian, etc. 
Brass Cabinets, Easels, and various kinds of 
Foreign Art Furniture OPEN EVENINGS. 

GUMP'S COLLECTION OF FOREIGN OIL PAINTINGS now 
on Exhibition in our Gallery. 

S. & G. GUMP, 

Mom. 581-C83 Market Street. 

«© TO 

Gh "W. OLABK &c CO.,' 
653 Market Street, 

FOR 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 



Ruinart Pere & Fils 

VIN BRUT, 1884. 



Donald de v. Graham, Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast 

124 SANSOME STREET, S. *'. 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



PUGILISTIC. The event of the week has been the matching of 
Peter Jackson and Jim Corbett by the California Athletic 
Club. The match, it is generally understood, is for two trophies, 
one of the value of $8,500, which will go to the winner of the 
contest, and the other of $1,500, which will be drawn down by 
the loser, as a salve to heal his wounded feelings. The making of 
this match has been quite unexpected in many circles, simply 
because it has been well known that Jackson has been out of 
sorts for some time past, owing to many obvious reasons; also, 
that Jim Corbett has been booked, to some extent, to meet Slavin, 
the other famous Antipodean. It so happens that since Slavin's 
victory over Joe McAuliffe, the " Mission Boy," his stock has 
been high enough for him to indulge in the ills to which other 
blooded stock are heir to. He has caught the influenza. To the 
ordinary mortal in this country influenza means simply a cold in 
the head, to shed which we take a mustard foot-bath and a hot 
drink, to superinduce a copious sweat. But, back in the aristo- 
cratic circle into which Slavin appears to have drifted on the wave 
or his present popularity, influenza may mean something more 
dangerous. At all events, Slavin felt that he could not abandon 
the surroundings of his London quarters and come out here to 
meet a dangerous man in the ring. If he won the battle, be 
thought his star would not shine any brighter than it does at the 
present time, and if he lost he was equally positive he would be 
in the potage, like so many of his confreres who have done hard 
training before him. 

The match between Jackson and Corbett was bound to be made 
eventually. Two such men could never have been kept apart 
for the reason that they are beyond doubt the two cleverest 
heavy-weights of this day. 

The meeting is booked for May 21st, and it is a certainty that 
the members of the California Athletic Club will be treated to a 
magnificent display of boxing. The contest may last a little 
longer than has been the rule, but every inch of it will be fought 
for in the most scientific manner. The odds are on neither side, 
and he who picks out the best conditioned man will come near 
picking a winner. 

Young Mitchell was before the Club the other evening regarding 
his battle with La Blanche. Mitchell asks that the Club employ 
him as boxing instructor for a term of one year at a salary of 
$1,200. He also desires that some contest take place before his 
does with the Marine. The young Californian is established here 
in a profitable business, and he is a man of family. He argues right- 
ly, according to his point of view, that the California Club has just 
recovered from a severe struggle with the law as expounded by 
Captain Short. The Club came out a victor, it is true, but there 
is no telling whether the old gray-haired guardian of the peace 
may not want to try the battle all over again. " It is not prob- 
able he will," says Mitchell, " but if he does, I would prefer hav- 
ing him take in some other unfortunate besides myself. I know 
I'd be out all right in a short time, but I prefer being exactly and 
precisely safe." 

As to the position of $100 a month, Mitchell simply asks it be- 
cause he knows there is a position of that sort vacant in the Club, 
and he thinks in point of ability, as well as on account of his 
long and friendly connection, he is entitled to it as well as any 
other professor. 

The great middle-weight battle between Pitzsimmons and 
Dempsey will take place in New Orleans on the 14th inst. To 
date no reliable news has been obtained as to the doings of the 
men. There is no question but that they are training hard. News 
reaches herefrom New York that Dempsey money is going about 
without takers. It is not the same here. As a rule there is 
Australian money here without takers. It is said that the 
Spreckels have $5,000 invested on the antipodean, and they are 
willing to go a few more ducats that they are right. At the same 
time there is some money around Sutter and Kearney streets for 
Dempsey even at a bit of odds. 

THE TTJRF. — At the annual meeting* of the Blood Horse Asso- 
ciation, held Tuesday night, Ariel Lathrop refused the Presi- 
dency, and Dan Burns had the office and fame thrust upon him. 
P. A. Finnigan was elected Vice-President. Colonel Thornton 
was selected Second Vice-President, and|the following were chosen 
as a Board of Directors: M. F. Tarpey, M. A. Gunst, James P. 
Kerr and P. V. Quinlan. Neither the Treasurer nor Secretary 
were elected, but the positions were left to be filled by the Board 
of Directors. P. A. Finnigan is a candidate for Treasurer, and 
may again handle the funds of the association in that capacity. 

A spring meeting of seven days running will be given at the 
Bay District Track. 

SKATING. — In the two-mile skating sweepstake race at the 
Olympian Rink for a $300 purse J. A. Snowden won in the 
splendid time of 6:2H. te« feet ahead of bis nearest competitor, 
Frank Delmont, of London, The other starter was Joseph Wald- 
stein. 



A cablegram from London" is to the effect that, in the interna- 
tional amateur skating race of one mile and a half, with three 
turns, Joseph F. Donoghue, of Newbury, N. Y., amateur cham- 
pion of America and Canada, won in 4 :46. This beats all existing 
records for that distance. Loveday, the British champion, was 
second in 5:08. There were two more entries. 

It must be remembered that, in this race, the American was 
at a disadvantage in the construciion of the track with such sharp 
and peculiar turns that are familiar to the English only. 

SHOOTING. — It is sad to have to record the death in Buenos 
Ayres of the graceful little rifle shot, Miss Annie Oakley. She 
was born at Woodlands, Darke county, Ohio, August 13, 1866, 
where she lived until 1S83, when her remarkable skill with a rifle 
caused a prominent promoter of sport to engage her as a star 
and arrange a tourney, at which she won the female champion- 
ship at rifle shooting. In February, 1885, she shot at 5,000 glass 
balls in one day, loading the guns herself. She used a sixteen- 
gauge gun at fifteen yards, the balls being thrown from three 
traps. She broke 4,777 out of 5,000, and broke the 1,000 ball 
record on the second 1,000 by missing only sixteen. She completed 
her task in less than nine hours. Miss Oakley shot about fifty 
professional matches and tourneys and had thirty-five prizes. 
Her collection of firearms was the finest in America. At Oak- 
point in 18S7 she shot a match at live birds with Jim Pilkington, 
and won by one bird, killing twenty-five straight. She also shot 
a match with Phil. Daly, Jr., at Long Brach and won. She made 
a record of 96 out of 100 clay pigeons, and 47 out of 50 live birds 
at MerchantvJlle, N. J. 

The old saying, " A man should grow in wisdom as he grows in 
years," is being daily put into practice by the number, continually 
increasing, of those of mature age who find by experience that the 
best place to get their clothes is from the first-class establishment of 
J. M. Litchfield & Co., merchant and military tailors, 12 Post street. 



"Render unto Caesar the things which are Cffisar's," and credit 
where credit is due, in accepting a fact gainsayed by none, that if 
both comfort and style are desired in head-gear, these can be obtained 
by buying your cranium covering at the leading establishment of 
White, the "Hatter, 614 Commercial street. 



HIGHLAND BRAND MILK I 



the oi^rXiir 



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It contains no sugar or chemicals, but is simply pure cow's milk, 
and can be used the same as fresh milk for every purpose. 
For sale by all grocers and druggists. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., Sole Agents, 

S.v FRANCISCO. 

JOSEPH GIUOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medals, Paris 1878—1889. 

/Jgy-These Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
States, MR. HY. HOE, ill John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 

pom¥ery sec 

CHAMPAGNE. 



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H, R, H, the Prince of Wales, 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 327-329 MARKET STREET. 

Sole A Kvuis for lb la Kenoivned Ilrand, 







SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



II 



SHOTS FROM THE MITRA1LLE- 

■ .- 

COMING out from thr Mercantile I Ibnry on< tly. I 

•mruunlcalion. As ii Appears to barmoolu wltfa 
in my letter of a former dale I send it to 
you in its entirety: 

Clmb; 
i 

- oee the ailoptlon of the rulo-oiteol toe latest— forbidding 

club tables. li«- h« boeo dbturbed lu his mind, 

turbi 

i tauro, «n.] thus Invite one 

of Mr. Quay's pollt« re prima red lo this, that, finding t»i^ head 

irtably warm, he j»l« I his ii.it . - there Is no i i 

- the 'i<e of the (lo \r f"r that pun . whereupon one of the mom- 

■» ha?, an ooforUUMta habit— disagreeable an. I disgusting 

the wrong places, but generally upon the Door, mistook the 
hat for ft cuspidor, an«i shamefully misuse I ll Xour petitioner, therefore, 
respectfully suggesta tbo adoption of a rule forbidding the voiding of saliva 
in the reading-room. Bucb a rule would '•*.■ in ooosonance with that other 
statntor] members while in that room; or 

If this cannot b< rou think It could not be conveniently enforced, 

your petitioner thai a sufficient number of pegs, or ho 

placed in the wall f"r members' hats lo be huug upon out of the reach of 
thr average spitter. 

—The rule which prohibits the shearing of members, not up-stairs, 
but by the barber, between the hours of 6 ami 7 P. H., is a great lacon- 
ic* to your petitioner, whose avocations are such that he cannot sub- 
mit himself to the manipulation of the tonsorial artist before a quarter 
past fire, and he therefore respectfully petitions your most worthy ami 
honorable Board for a modification of this rule totbe extent of a quarter of 
an hour twice a month, say on the 1st anil 15th. Practical and hard-work- 
ing members of your Boar.l, such as your worthy Treasurer, will appreciate 

the reasonableness of this reqno&t, and such veteran laborers as Mr. 

end Mr. . who daily violate the principles of the Eight Flour Law, will, 

your petitioner ie persuaded, see the propriety of granting this request. 

Third— The rule which requires members to personally visit the barber's 
apartments for the purpose of entering their names upon his slate, instead 
of, as heretofore, sending him word by one of the servants that his services 
were required, and allowing him to make the entry showing the order of 
precedence, works a very great hardship to your petitioner, to whom walk- 
ing is painful, because of rheumatism and other physical afflictious inci- 
dent to old age; and he, therefore, prays for a modification of the rules to 
the extent of allowing the servants of the Club to carry the slate to those 
members who wish to sign it, and whom it would inconvenience to go in 
person for that purpose to the barber, who is no longer permitted to act as 
their araenuonsis. 

Fourth— Whilst your petitioner cordially approves of the rule which pro- 
hibits "tlie smoking of pipes in the Club," he strongly dissents from the 
one which says: "Children shall not be brought into the Club," because it 
is cruel and unnatural, and contrary to the command of the Divine Teacher 
who said: Suffer little children to come unto me." Had this rule been 
formulated by one of those unfortunates who, in certain countries, are 
mutilated before being placed in charge of the bed-chamber, whose sanctity 
they cannot violate, one could understand it; but its promulgation by 
men, who are supposed to be the fathers of families, is shocking to the 
tenderest feelings of humanity— and explains the hatred mothers feel to- 
ward "The Club." Respectfully submitted by your 

Petitionee. 
San Francisco, December 31, 1S00. 

Our best society has been amusing itself of late with a novelty ! 
(so called) a game entitled "Progressive Hearts." Now, any 
student of our social system will know that here — as elsewhere 
both beaux and belles are adepts in the game. The timid flut- 
tering lo life; the awakening; the bursting into bloom; the pro- 
gress from one to another are stages with which our society is 
thoroughly familiar— therefore the gloss of nobility is wanting. 
However, sometimes proficiency is as great a charm as novel- 
ty, and we would modestly offer a suggestion to our society that 
they give a practical illustration of the game "Playing With 
Fire," to enable onlookers to see to what perfection they have 
attained in it by constant practice on the quiet. 
# # # 

There are many customs which we are daily copying from the 
English — some of them absurd in a country with institutions like 
ours; others again meritorious and worthy of imitation. Possibly 
one of the latter is the sweet-toned voice peculiar to the English 
girl. Every one who has seen the wonderful change wrought in 
our girls who have gone East for a season — or rather heard the 
change— will agree to this. The nasal rasping, high pitched tone 
is replaced by a low, modulated one; the careless slippery man- 
ner of sliding one word into another, like, for instance— "El'gant 
gent'man," is changed to a careful articulation and soft accent. 
Truly may we be thankful for this phase of Anglomania. 

# # * 

One custom, however, which is held most dear by the Briton, 
is the domestic character of his Christmas festivities. Nowhere 
on this round globe of ours is the Festival of Christmas and the 
Yule-tide more cherished as a home gathering than in England; 
and this custom our people seem to be in danger of honoring in 
the breach rather than in the observance. 

# # * 

It has lately become the fashion for New York swells to pass 
the holiday at some country resort. The New Yorkers who now 



country pUoftl do thi-. no doubt) In imitation) of their British 
models, who. an a rule, dwell in Lbs oo an try. But our would-be 
swells, who follow lbs Eastern fads with a blind loosen 
are raking the cue by rushing to country hotels t.. eel their 
Christmas dinner, leaving the bona droit end fireside to their 
servants, a large proportion, to bs sore, live In hotels in the 
rity, anil to them it matters little, of ooorso, whether the hotel 

feast Is in town or country— ft is merely B ohangeol caravansary. 
Bnl to the householder, and especially those among us blessed 
with a domestic circle, it seems ■ pity to break the reverence of 
home ties on BUCh an occasion as Christinas. 

• • • 

There is an old Adage which says, "fine feathers make fine 
birds." An apt illustration of this old saw was given by the 
Jenkins's of the daily press after the la.st " Friday Night " cotil- 
lion, when they gushed over the exceptionally fine appearance 
made by two ladies, who are the fortunate possessors of million- 
aire husbands, (iranted, the ladies in themselves are tine speci- 
mens of California women: still, their elaborate costumes, described 
by Jenkins as " totally ahead of everything in the room," were 
the result of foreign modistes and unlimited means. So that an- 
other old saying might be remembered by the reporters, "Com- 
parisons are odious." 

* » # 

11 It is not strange," said a pretty girl, the other day, " that 
some people can do things and not a word be said, while, were 
others to do half — my! what a fuss there would be." She was 
alluding to the constant companionship of a social light, whose 
matronly charms are decidedly on the wane, and a New Yorker 
who is visiting our coast this winter, and the frequent constitu- 
tionals indulged in in some of the shadiest of the Park avenues. 

# # # 

Apropos of the Park, among the most charming sights to be 
seen there during the exquisite weather of the holiday season, 
has been a perfect turn-out — ideal, we were about to say — but 
surely most realistic. It was a buggy and pair of light sorrel 
horses of stylish appearance, in which sat a young blonde banker 
with his brilliant brunette wife, both young, handsome, each in a 
different style, and happy. 

# # # 

The young army officer, whose frequent libations at a Christmas 
dinner caused his hostess such distress, is in a penitential mood; 
and if the story does not get out in a dead give-away, he will be 
forgiven. Yours, Mitrailleuse. 

A New Savings Bank. 
The California Safe Deposit & Trust Company, with paid up 
capital of $1,000,000, corner of Montgomery and California streets, 
have established a Savings Department in connection with their 
business and are inviting savings accounts from all classes of our 
citizens. They expect to pay as large a rate of interest, if not larger, 
than any other savings institution in the city. This company ac- 
cords to depositors a guarantee of 307 per cent. Call for prospectus. 

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the City Government. 

Premises equipped with this System are 
granted a reduced rate of insurance. 

Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Co., 

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IN CALIFORNIA, 

BY ALFRED ROBINSON, 



JUST PUBLISHED BY 



WILLIAM DOXEY, 

Importer of New and Rare Books, 
Under Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



BUY "U.S." 44 WINCHESTER, 22 SHORT 

And other " U.S." Pistol and Rifle Cartridges. For accuracy and 
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XT. S. OA.E.mai3DC3-E CO- 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




New York City, Dec. 27, 1800. 

CHRISTMAS! Once more with na and left us ! With what a 
variety of emotions does each one of us look upon this season 
of the year? Old Gourmet thinks it is more than annoying to 
him to have to stay from Delmonico's and the club, and devour 
large and dyspeptic quantities of roast goose at his frends be- 
cause of the season of the year, when he would infinitely prefer 
a rechcrch& dish of terrapin a la Maryland. Nor does he see why 
he should be compelled to force down successive gulps of that 
abortive entremet called Christmas plum-pudding — the only re- 
deeming feature of which is the brandy sauce — just because they 
eat it over in England. Ethel, dear, charming, naive little Ethel, 
is wondering when Jack means to propose, and is in a sad quan- 
dary to decide in her own mind as to whether she has sinned 
very grievously in allowing him to kiss her on the stairs, the 
other night. There is a disagreeable argument from her con- 
science to the effect that it cannot be right for two unengaged 
young people to indulge in that sort of thing. But then, ye godsl 
how Jack'can kiss! Old Moneybags, Ethel's father, is trying to 
weigh in the balance, in the event of that young scapegrace ask- 
ing him for his daughter's hand, the advantage of being rid of 
milliners' and dressmakers' bills in the future, with the awful 
expense a wedding and trousseau will entail. And so one might go 
on through the whole garnet of human nature. To each one 
the season brings different thoughts and varied sentiments; some 
good, some not worth the birth, others bad and ignoble. 

* * # 

The height of social snobbery has been reached, I think, in 
New York, when those who claim to lead, guide and rule that 
unknown quantity, the Four Hundred, descend to the publica- 
tion in the daily papers of the menus for their Christmas dinners. 
Yet this was done very generally, the past week, by such social 
stars as Mrs. William Astor, Mrs. Whitney and Mrs. J. Pierpont 
Morgan. It has long been the custom, with what are known as 
'* special " writers, to print each year, on Christmas Eve, what 
will be eaten by convicts, paupers, newsboys and lunatics in the 
various institutions on the following day. To these bills of fare 
are now added the choice cartes of our upper ten, and the aristo- 
crats vie with the inmates of prisons in an etalage of their Noel 
meal. There has been a good deal of discussion as to the conduct 
of the Subscription Dance at Delmonico's on Tuesday night. It 
appears that a very few of the season's debutantes were admitted 
to it at all, and only these few at the express wish of Mrs. Will- 
iam Astor. The consequence was, a most uncomfortable slow- 
ness and dreariness pervaded the whole affair, and many families 
of the best set, piqued at their treatment by the initial subscribers, 
have left the city for visits in the country. Revenge is sweet, 
however, and I have not the slightest doubt that the offended 
ones will simply bide their time, and eventually get even with 
the five patronesses for the slight they have put upon them. 
Amongst the California people now in New York, 1 had the 
pleasure of meeting, the other evening, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Edwin Dean, of San Francisco, who are spending the winter at 
the Fifth Avenue Hotel. Mr. Dean, it is rumored, is a many- 
times millionaire, having realized enormous profits by his West- 
ern mining speculations and Pacific Slope real estate investments. 
Consequently his son Walter, a handsome young fellow of about 
twenty-five, forms a solid attraction for the Gotham belles of the 
season. Walter L. Dean is a regular " hail fellow, well met," be- 
longs to several of the principal New York clubs, and is as great 
a favorite among men about town as he is a desirable parti for 
impressionable buds and maneuvering mammas. Mrs. Dean, his 
mother, still retains distinct traces of a superior beauty ; she was, 
I hear, in her time, one of the acknowledge belles of the Golden 
Gate. If I mistake not, she is a native of this city, which, per- 
haps, accounts for her preference for the metropolis to San Fran- 
cisco. 

* # # 

"Lucky" Baldwin, the California; millionaire, probably sets 
down the old adage " it never rains but it pours," as a very true 
one. It was bad enough that a ferocious but favorite mastiff 
should do several thousand dollars' worth of damage by utterly 
ruining the articles de vertn at his magnificent Santa Anita resi- 
dence, but he sustains a far greater loss in the sudden death of 
his famous three-year-old filly, Sinaloa. The mare died at Morris 
Park, N. J., and was as much mourned by the horsemen and 
jockeys who knew her, as though she had been a relative. She 
had won for her owner, during the present year, nearly thirty 
thousand dollars, and was valued at twenty thousand. *' Lucky " 
Baldwin accounts for the death as one of the results o.f his at- 
tempting to winter the racing stable away from California. A 
costly experiment, truly. 

* * # 

Thursday evening witnessed the opening performance of Miss 
Fanny Davenport in Sardou's Cleopatra, at the Fifth Avenue 



Theatre. The auditorium was crowded, but not more so than 
the stage, which, throughout the play, was literally sardined 
with supernumaries. As a spectacular and mechanical play, Cleo- 
patrais unrivaled by any of its predecessors. Some of its machinic 
effects are absolutely novel, and everything pertaining to the art 
of the stage carpenter is perfection itself. As to the piece, in spite 
of the fact that its author declares be has utterly ignored the im- 
mortal bard in his construction of it, it. is difficult to imagine 
whence he has obtained many of his mythical, though highly 
dramatic events, unless it be from Shakespeare himself. In any 
case, I fail to see wherein he has improved upon the latter, 
with the exception that he has, perhaps, turned out a play 
more capable of stage representation. Cleopatra more closely 
resembles Theodora than anything else; in fact, at times 
the action is striking in its resemblance. With regard 
to the obese Fanny in the title-role, there is no denying that she 
works conscientiously and hard; so hard, in fact, that it is a pity 
that Nature should not reward her physicial efforts, by relieving 
her of some of that annoying, superfluous, adipose tissue. Of 
course, every one compares her to the divine Sara, and of course, 
as no one has, as yet, seen the latter in the part, every one is 
very just and very clever in so doing. As a whole, I think Miss 
Davenport's Cleopatra will prove more than half a success, the 
wonderful stage effects alone, going a great way to replace many 
shortcomings. One of the most novel of the new ideas intro- 
duced, is the representation of a simoom or sandstorm of the 
east, which is reproduced with startling realism. Trees sway in 
tbe awful winds, clouds of sand fly across the stage and Boreas 
and Jove emulate each other in the noise of their tempests and 
thunders. Miss Davenport uses a genuine, real, live serpent for 
her suicidal death, and the worm knows its lines well. Her 
physical proportions will be one advantage to her at any rate, as 
it can never be claimed as in the case of Mrs. Potter, that the asp 
wasted away and died from the lack of proper nourishment. 

Babbler. 



"A Dry Cough" 

Is dangerous as well as troublesome. 
It renders the patient liable to the rup- 
ture of a blood vessel or to other serious 
injury of throat and lungs. To allay 
bronchial irritation and give immediate 
relief, the best medicine is Ayer's 
Cherry Pectoral. 

"I was recently troubled with a dry 
eolith which seemed to be caused by an 
irritation in the throat. My physician 
prescribed for me, but no relief was ob- 
tained. A little over a week ago, my 
attention being called to Ayer's Cherry 
Pectoral, I concluded to try it, and pur- 
chased a bottle. After taking this med- 
icine only one day, I could see a change 
for the better, and, by the time I had 
used it a week, my cough had entirely 
disappeared." — H. W. Denny, Franklin 
square, Worcester, Mass. 

"Ayer's Cherry Pectoral leads all 
other medicines as a sure, safe, and 
speedy cure of throat and lung troubles." 
— W. H. Graff & Co., Druggists, Carson, 
Iowa. 

Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Sold byaH Druggists. Price $1; six bottles, $5, 



The Strath more Apartment House, 

N. w. corner Larkfn and Fulton Streets. 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR FAMILIES. 

First class in every respect. Elevator day and night. First-class Restau- 
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Apply to Janitor iu the building, or to A. HAY WARD, No. 224 Cali- 
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OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisoo. 

-A. QUIET HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



BAN H: INCI8C0 NEWS I ETTER. 



13 



£?Y~ 01 




Hi GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE! 



SKAI.8KIN. which \* worn in a shade approaching to black, is 
regarded almost with reverence l>y the connoisseurs who know 
that the original owner of the garment threatens to become ex- 
tinct. A certain Amerienn Professor acquaints the world ili:it, in 
his continent, only one hundred thousand seals remain to be slain 
for the comfort of womankind. The more reckless of the Sex 
may feel that a hundred thousand should go a long way and 
woold probably serve her time: but there is no doubt that the 
Professor's advice to leave the seal alone for seven years Bhould be 
adopted. Meanwhile, all who own jackets of this beautiful fur 
must be congratulated : those who do not will have to pay heavily 
for the acquisition of one. 

The opening of the skating season in Paris is, of course, an oc- 
casion for the display of new ideas in winter fashions, although 
the suddenness of the change of weather always linds many un- 
prepared with costumes at once elegant and business-like. Most 
of the prettiest gowns are of dark blue cloth, trimmed with braid- 
ing or with fur; the best jackets are of sealskin, or of astrachan, 
and the hats most favored are in the toque form, or in what are 
termed the English turban, a warm arrangement of folded cloth 
or velvet with a border of fur. 

The long, well-fitting coat which bears so many different names, 
but which is really a genuine Newmarket, is worn by every one 
in Paris. Shoulder capes of varied material are prepared to be 
worn with the jacket in cold weather. Some of these capes are 
of fur, others in warm cloth lined with silk. A charming cloak 
that English people are adopting is hardly seen in Faris. It con- 
sists of a yoke and high collar, surmounting a full fur-lined man- 
tle which ends below the waist. This garment is sensible and 
warm, easily put on and easily taken off, and may be carried on 
the arm to don when necessary. 

The shorter capes, which are used in the same way in Paris, 
have yokes and collars of a material called Kalouga plush, which 
appears as if a wet finger had been pressed at intervals on the ma- 
terial. Perhaps the intention has been to imitate the long-haired 
astrachan, but the result is more curious than pretty. Some of 
the mantles have yokes in long Vandykes, descending from the 
collar in Kalouga plush. The cloth cape is gathered under this 
yoke, and is sometimes heavily braided or covered with passe- 
menterie and lined with shot silk. 



Jackets of the new plush are cut long, and have sleeves of some 
other material. Occasionally, the jacket is of the other material, 
and has sleeves and collar of plush. A sort of astrachan cloth, 
made in some color with black curls on it, is very pretty for cold 
weather. A costume of blue woolen material covered with black 
curls is very effective, the skirt being cut and draped as carefully 
as a riding habit. The jacket bodice is of the long coat shape. 

The French hats are still almost ridiculous in their immense 
size, whilst the bonnets are absurdly small. The crowns of the 
toques are often exquisitely embroidered with tinsel and gems to 
match the decorations of the dresses. Pendant balls of gold or sil- 
ver are dotted on the material of which the bonnets are made, 
and sometimes a passementerie of brilliant bead-work edges the 
brim. Nothing is too sumptious forpersonal wear at this present 
time, and the color of the headdress is often as gorgeous as the 
quality is extravagant. 

Astrachan runs sealskin very close in Paris. It is considered 
distinctly " chic," and there is much rivalry on the score of quality 
in the jackets worn. No fur varies more than astrachan in tex- 
ture. The age of the animal, its nationality and its surroundings 
continue to produce something more or less silky and soft. The 
jackets are worn fairly long, and are generally worn with muff 
and hat to match. The price is enormous, nothing under about 
$150 being considered wearable by a fashionable lady, whilst sums 
into thousands of dollars are given by the owners of long purses 
for these simple little garments. 



Theatre bodices are among the latest novelties. One in pink 
velvet has an open coat, bordered by one of the exquisite galons 
jeweled. This gown is jeweled in turquoise stones and black dead 
jet, with sparkles of crystals here and there. The back has a deep 
flat frill closely laid. The front is draped in embroidered lace, and 
the same lace borders the low cut front, and sweeps over the 
arms, which are bare of sleeves. A vest of crimson chiffon and 
red crysanthemums, with maiden hair completes the toilette. 



The reputation of Moraghan.lin the California Market, for keep- 
ing the finest oysters, can be testified to by all disciples of Epicurus. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla stops the nauseous discharges of catarrh, and 
cures the complaint. 



SWEEPING REDUCTIONS 

IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. 



n p™5WivA°«,Htf. J?TORS!!!& B ?S. ln Program, "ffords AN EX" 
',,' ™£*S£} FAVORAJMJ OPPORTUNITY for 111 who have any pre. 

r. 1 ..". Ml i . '.' l'! u T'" , ' ro "-""" 1 lliii"<-»inH.iljrof ourgr.al Full 
and Miner stork f„ r the purpose -f disposing of everything " u closely 

as possible, previous I annual .Slock taking. ' 

All are respectfully | nT ited to call during this great sale and inspect tho 
liovrltle* ■I 1 * ' r -"'" H """ed, which Include the latest style* and 

Ladies' and Children's Outer Garments, 
Black and Colored Dress Goods, 
Silks, Velvets, Laees, Gloves, 

Ribbons, Umbrellas, Trimmings, 
Handkerchiefs, Gents' Furnishings, 

Hosiery, Underwear, Corsets, 
Blankets, Flannels, Linens, 

Lace Curtains, etc., etc. 



■Mail orders promptly and carefully executed. Goods delivered free 
in Oakland, Alameda Berkeley and San Rafael. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS. 

The Best o f All 

THE IfcT.A.'TIOItT-A.ILi 

Transformer System of Incandescent Lighting ! 

Our Apparatus is of the Highest Efficiency. Mechanically 
and Electrically. 

National Direct Current Dynamos for Isolated Lighting;. Western Electric 
Arc Dynamos and Lamps. Racine Automatic Engines. Boilers and Oil- 
Burning Outflis. A full line of Electric Lighting; Materials and Supplies. 

We are prepared to undertake the construction of Electrical Plants of 
whatever magnitude. Correspondence solicited. 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 
314 Calfornia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



WOMAN'S HOSPITAL. 

THE CALIFORNIA WOMAN'S HOSPITAL, 

On Sacramento Street, 

Between Baker and Lyon, is now open for the reception of patients. 

There is a Free Ward, Pay Ward, and Rooms for Private Patients. Pure 

air, good diet, and the best of nursing and medical attendance are bestowed 

on all alike Out patients treated gratuitously. For admission apply at 

Hospital. ^ 



PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

127 First Street, 

manuf actors 

Boilers, Engines, and eve ry Description of Machinery & Castings 

SIPIEOX^IiTXIES: 

Hazelton Boilers, Wheelocfe Automatic Cut-off* Engines, 

Duncan Concentrators, Baker Horse Power. 

Ira P. Rankin, President. Willis G. Dodd, Vice-Pres't and Manager. 



H. S. BRIDGE & CO., 

MEECHiLNT TAILOES, 

622 Market Street, upstairs, opposite Palace Hotel, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Many Novelties lu Imported Wear. Shirts to Order a Specialty 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




THE Comstock market has been dull and inactive daring the 
week, with a few light spurts in the middle mines, which 
were too short-lived to act as a lever on the balance of the list. 
The news from Potosi has been highly favorable, and in the past, 
prices would have been fluctuating at much higher rates on the 
prospects. It is safe to say that this condition of affairs cannot 
last forever on the street, and a change may be looked for at any 
moment. There is no scarcity of money, and it only requires a 
boom in some well-known and favorite stock to bring speculators 
back as eager as ever. The sale of the Benton ground to the Alta 
is so far only a turn of the litigation which has been going on for 
some time between these companies. The Benton people still 
have six months for redemption, and should they do so, of course 
that will leave the possession of the property vested in them as 
heretofore. The Tuscaroras have, as yet, shown no signs of re- 
action, and the prices at which the leading properties are now 
quoted are simply absurd. jSTo sane person can imagine that a 
mine like the Commonwealth could be purchased outright for 
anything like $100,000 in cold cash, and yet the stock is being 
handed around the street at even lower figures. The same might 
be truthfullysaid about many other mines in this camp, and the 
reason for such a strange condition of affairs is beyond ordinary 
comprehension. 

$? ? 

THE result of the recent elections in the Quijotoa Mines will be 
considered satisfactory by people generally, who understand 
the animus of the attempt to wrest the control from the old and 
efficient management. For many years these mines have been 
worked economically and to the best advantage under the super- 
vision of Mr. Wm. 8. Lyle, who in addition to otherqualirications 
for the Presidency of the companies, can boast of a thorough and 
practical knowledge of mining. What claims the other gentlemen 
who aspired to the position might have to urge upon the sharehold- 
ers are not exactly clear, unless it might be a willingness to exist on 
salaries which could easily stand an increase. Heretofore, however, 
they have been simply known on the street as stock manipulators, 
and one of them, at least, has acquired wealth by handling the 
shares of these very companies on a very safe basis for himself. 
Now that the matter has been quietly settled, there is every reason 
to hope that higher prices will rule when the general market takes 
a turn for the better, which could hardly have been expected had 
the elections gone the other way, and the control had drifted into 
the hands of weak people. 

$ t * 

MINE owners are complaining of the great scarcity of miners 
throughout the State. It is almost impossible to procure 
competent men lately for even the highest rate of wages. Years 
ago, when mining speculation was active, and a chance offered to 
make money in the stock market, many young men belonging to 
the best families in this city left school or business and took up 
a pick in the leading Comstock mines. In this way the ranks 
were constantly recruited, and with the best material. It is a 
mistaken idea to imagine that work of this kind does not require 
a more than ordinary degree of intelligence. Success depends 
mainly on a skill which can only come from a close study of de- 
tails, which can only be acquired by the application of hard com- 
mon sense, accompanied by immense powers of endurance. Many 
men have been attracted to Montana, Idaho and the North West- 
ern States by the new mineral discoveries which have been de- 
veloped recently, and this in a great measure accounts for the 
complaints which are heard from here on all sides. It is not so 
long ago that one of the wealthy Nevada corporations had to ad- 
vertise for men, and even then the applications were mostly 
from a class of people who, in the past, would not have been em- 
ployed in the most ordinary capacity. 

OSCAR NEWHOUSE, the owner of the Diamond I). Mine, of 
Nevada County, arrived in town during the week on a short 
visit. He has taken up his residence at the mine, which will, in 
the future, be worked under his personal supervision. The 
property has developed wonderfully under the management of 
Mr. Newhouse, and it is said that there is now in sight enough 
ore to keep the 30-stamp mill running for the next ten years. In 
the spring more stamps will be put in, and the mine will then be 
in a position to pay a steady dividend on a valuation of $2,000,000. 
The best of it is, the same property was offered in London some 
years ago, and refused, the imported expert, as usual, seeing noth- 
ing in it. The property is not now for sale. 
HI 

AND now comes the Valley Gold. Judgment has been rendered 
in London in favor of Mr. John Henry Angus against Sir 
Charles Clifford, Mr. Meales, Mr. Nelson and Mr. Lloyd, Directors 
of the Valley Gold Company, about which the News Letter has 
had something to say since it was first brought out under their 



auspices. The action was for damages caused to the plaintiff by 
his being induced to take shares in the company by a certain un- 
true statement contained in the prospectus issued by the author- 
ity of the defendants. We have not, as yet, obtained the exact 
facts of the case, although a copy of the decision by Mr. Justice 
Komer came to hand by last mail. It is lengthy and remarkably 
mild in tone, considering the circumstances. In regard to the 
statements, whatever they may have been, the Judge says: 
"Now, I think beyond any question, the statements were not 
true as to the reports of Messrs. Jackson, Pearson and Kodda. 
* * * Upon the evidence, I come to the conclusion that these 
statements, even as applied to Mr. Del Mar's reports, are not true 
in any fair sense.'' Judgment was rendered against the de- 
fendants, who were ordered to pay the costs of the action up to 
and including the judgment, the amount of damages to be taken 
under consideration. Now that this precedent has been estab 
Hshed, there is not a shareholder in the company who can not 
come in for damages on similar grounds. We would rather not 
be in the Directors' shoes at present. The next question is, will 
Mr. Del Mar come to the front now, and help his friends out of 
an awkward predicament. 

? * $ 

THE New Pittsburg (Grass Valley) Gold Mine, Limited, has been 
incorporated in London to take over the property of that 
name, which was Hoated some months ago for a large amount of 
money. No results have, as yet, been attained in the way of bul- 
lion, and it seems absurd to go on spending money in such an ap- 
parently reckless manner. It may be, however, that the manage- 
ment at the mine may have something to do with the misfor- 
tunes which have followed the old company. The Directory in 
this city is composed of first-class men, who rank high in the 
community for strict integrity in business matters, but it does not 
follow that they are fully posted on practical mining. The dis- 
trict is one of the best in California, and it seems strange that any 
property with pretensions as a mine should be running behind all 
the time. 

S * S 

WE understand that Mr. Rathgeb, after doing the grand tour 
of Europe, and revisiting his native place in Switzerland, in- 
tends to honor the representatives in London of the old Union 
Gold Company with a call. This will have a tendency to en- 
lighten those gentlemen on some of the mysteries of the mining 
business. They sit at home and regret the loss of half a million 
of dollars, while the mine owner is enabled to travel au grand 
seigneur. We do not blame Mr. Kathgeb for using his opportuni- 
ties to such good advantage, and as for the others, they richly de-. 
serve to suffer for their obstinate stupidity. 

lit 

THE suit of the Idaho Company against the Maryland has been 
finally settled on a basis which gives Mr. Dorsey much less 
money than he might have obtained years ago. The expert tes- 
timony in regard to boundaries was so very clear in favor of the 
Colmans that it would have only been a waste of time and money 
to have pushed the suit. It is said that the settlement was ef- 
fected on a basis of .$6,000. 

IS 5 

THERE has been considerable curiosity in New York about the 
Bank of London and Chicago, which was recently incor- 
porated in Chicago with a capital of $1,000,000 furnished by Eng- 
lishmen. It is generally understood that it is to be a place of de- 
posit for most of the English Syndicate doing business in and about 
thatcity. As yet the capitalists behind the bank are unknown, the 
incorporators being attorneys representing the projectors of the 
enterprise. 

I I S 

THE Elkhorn Mining Company of London has just declared an 
interim dividend of 35 cents per share and a bonus of 10 cts. 
per share, making a distribution of $1.10 per share in respect of 
the first nine months working of the company. A balance of 
about $-42,500 is carried forward. This is the latest success in 
the promotion line of Messrs. Bradnober and Wartenweiler. 
lit 

COLONEL SUTHERLAND, President of the Holmes Mine of 
Candelaria, is comfortably ensconced at the Palace, having ar- 
rived from London during the early part of the week. He is ac- 
companied by Captain Hulse, a director of the London Syndicate, 
which is operating the mining enterprise in Nevada. 
ESS 

THE English Government is about to issue a number of £1 
notes. The amount will not be as large as has been surmised 
— probably will not exceed £5,000,000. It is believed that the new 
currency will be on a silver basis. It is also said that the Bank 
of Portugal intends issuing bank notes of 5,000 reis, payable in 
silver. 

KERWIN, the well-known Comstock mining man, is in town. 
He will probably leave in a few days on a flying trip to the 
Southern mining regions. 



Jan 8, 1891. 



s.w FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




' Hoar the Oriert" "What ihe dcTH art thou! 
■ Oq« thM will pUj the devil, sir. with you." 



A 8 in the West the evening *nn goee down, 
Ami dying, glorifies, with varied hues 
Of gold and purple, nit the Floating cloada 
That saw him slowly sink below the verge 
So the old year to as— who, with a sigh, 
Mark his last hour as he tranquil fades, 
Leaves many a rich-hued memory behind. 

The twilight fades, the night goes by, anon 
The Eastern sky is Unshed with joyons clouds, 
That wait, expectant, for the sun's return. 
And as be climbs the blue, and gleams and glows, 
(>laddenintr the world and all life with the dawn. 
The clouds and peaks receive his kiss, and blush, 
So we the fresh young New Year hail, nor grieve 
For that which in the solemn midnight died. 

The hope, the promise of some better things 

Than we have known, brightens dull hearts, as when 

A sunbeam swift, from parted clouds, breaks forth 

O'er meadows on a fitful April day, 

Chasing the shade to hide on hills and groves. 

The buried aspirations — though their graves 

Have not yet known a single season's change — 

Are all forgotten, as the child who flies 

To grasp Ihe gaudy moth, and, failing, turns 

To pluck a flower, which seems the richer prize. 

The storm-tossed sailor, when the wave is high 

And bitter winds, ice-laden sweep the deck, 

In dreams beholds the tropic summer seas, 

Where gentle zephyrs with the perfumed breath 

Of fruited woodlands, sigh through shroud and sail. 

Thus turning from the old year's cheated hopes 

And broken promises and erring deeds, 

We look beyond to pleasant scenes and paths, 

Which virgin months shall smilingly disclose. 

Come glad New Year, unwritten scroll, white page, 

Where we may write the record of good deeds 

Left long undone — annals of brave resolve 

By gentle patience and strong will accomplished. 

Come glad New Year and make us strong and true; 

And when you sink, sun-like, below the verge 

Be we the clouds to wear forevermore 

The golden brightness of your memories. » 

AN unfortunate seedsman on Battery street has been sued for 
divorce on the ground of cruelty. The complaint is a perfect 
gem in the line of divorce literature. It alleges that when dinner 
was not cooked to his taste, the old gentleman used to flourish a 
pocket knife, and threaten vengeance upon the heads of his trem- 
bling family. This was cruel enough, but another charge is that 
he was in the habit of preserving a sullen silence, to the great 
mental anguish of the domestic circle. Possibly this occurred 
when the victim was talked out in the second round. He was 
pugnacious, too, and given to inviting his sons into the alley to 
fight it out, and calling them cowards when they refused to put 
up their props and take the chance of a bruising from the paternal 
fist. That old gentleman is an object of sympathy. If he can- 
not do a little swearing in his own house, what reward is he to 
receive for providing for his family? If he cannot preserve a sullen 
silence whenever he elects, what the deuce is the use of his slav- 
ing away, day after day, for clothes for the boys and frocks and 
bonnets for the girls? And, feeling that the young men have 
passed the spanking age, it was chivalrous in the ancient to obey 
8olomon's injunction a la Marquis of Queensberry. 

HOW the delicately appreciative mouth of the epicure exudes a 
pleasing moisture as dreams of canvasback duck float across 
him. Take a fellow between forty-five and fifty, who has done 
with the flirtation follies of this life, and ask him whether he 
would surrender one juicy morsel of a sixteen minutes' canvas- 
back for the kiss of the loveliest woman in the world, and he will 
laugh to scorn the temptation of the daughter of Eve. Demand 
of this philosopher whether, at the bidding of the same ravishing 
beauty to her arras, her lips rosy, her arms gleaming, her bosom 
heaving, he could put aside the Burgundy, {with the chill off) 
which is to wash down the morsel, he will tell her to go home and 
not bother him, because he is a man of highly sensitive digestion. 
There is something so sacred and absorbing in canvasback duck 
that it brooks no rival. It's a jealous thing; it will have all a 
man's heart or none, and just tolerates the Burgundy to give spice 
to Us charms It will soon be dear. Were I the head of the 
church I would have prayers offered up in all the temples that 
canvasback this year be plump, plentiful and cheap. 



TH 18 • oontry is not very ap] >( the eeri 

who work directly f-. r Ita Interests. \ fen itten 

Hon \\ u « ailed to the feci thai the widow o( the gallant I 
was In poor circumstance Fhtre was. as |g usual In ca 

this nature, a thrill of sympathy, bo I in. thing was done aboul It 
Colonel tftnnegw, of the I nlted Statea Secret Service, died In thla 
city some two yean ago. Foi tinny years Finnegaa had nioal 
faithfully served this country, Id was an energetic, faithful and 
Intelligent man. His servfoM were recognised In Waahli 
and received the most favorable comment. Yet, when Flm 
•lied, his widow received no pension, and although some feeble ef- 
forts have been made by our representatives in Congress to secure 
to Mrs, Finnegas a pension, nothing bo far baa been accomplish i d, 
In England, a servant of the government, who worked with one- 
half the Industry of Colonel Eftnnegaa, might reel assured thai tin- 
recognition of his services would not terminate with life. There 
is a saying that Republics are ungrateful, and when we think .»f 
the land we live in, it seems to be correct. 

I THRILL with delight at the reflection that it is growing colder 
and colder every day in the East— that the men will have to 
wear overcoats and the women furs; that the ponds will be frozen 
and the sleigh belly' tinkle be heard upon the snow-lined road. 
Not, however, because the tailors will do a good business in over- 
coats, or that the furriers will keep up the price of sealskins, or 
that the livery men will charge ten dollars an hour for a sleigh- 
ride, but because of the ioy that will sweep through the veins of 
every newspaper reader in this city at the reflection that the base- 
ball season is over. Thank the Lord for it. Let us olfer up a 
prayer of thanks for the exemption from baseball news (by tele- 
graph) which will once more make life endurable. The little 
baseball troubles we have over here, which affects us only about 
once a week, we can endure. But the Eastern epidemic is worse 
than Asiatic cholera. 

IT was a British tourist 
With a short and frowsy jacket, 

And he said he was a lord or something more; 
And when his trunk was carried up, 
And he started to unpack it 
A colored man was peeping o'er the door. 

And after the tourist had removed a box of paper collars and 
a colored shirt from the pile of bricks beneath, he was astonished 
at being accosted by Captain Smith, who said: 

" We really do not want you, with your title, trunk and jacket, 
Take yourself and take your bricks outside our door ; 

There's a house across the way — you're at liberty to pack it 
For shelter, food and liquor — now no more." 

— To which the tourist, caressing his mutton-chop whiskers, re- 
sponded: 

"And is this 'ospitality, doled out in such a moiety, 

I'll be revenged — by Jupiter, I will." 
And the next day saw him launched in the very best society, 
Drinking Rhenish with his salmon on Nob Hill. 

I SHOULD like to see the fat dudes combine against the lean 
dudes, and enter into an honest contest for the appreciation of 
the other sex. By the way, the word " dude," like " masher," 
has about outlived its usefulness, and it is time that another term 
were invented to be applied to those who encroach upon woman's 
territory in the matter of vanity and personal adornment. Fat 
young men, if not romantic looking, have still a strong hold upon 
female regards. No lady enjoys hugging anything boney — dog, 
baby or dude. These lean dudes have usually abnormally long 
necks, and the picture of one of these fellows kissing a girl is 
ridiculously suggestive of a giraffe craning to pick up a cocoanut. 
But a nice, fat, sausage-shaped lad, with a tenderloin steak at the 
back of his neck, is a Cupid in trowsers, whom no women of 
taste can resist. 

LADIES, who pull up their stockings in doorways, are often seri- 
ously damaged by those rushers who charge up and down 
stairs on a four-bit collection with the speed of a locomotive. 
A very sweet, modest-looking girl, while engaged in this interest- 
ing occupation one day this week, in a doorway on Montgomery 
street, was run into by a long-legged, lantern-jawed collector, 
who had treed an unfortunate young lawyer in an upper story. 
The scoundrel came plump against the lady's bustle, knocking 
it quite out of gear and playing the deuce generally with the 
stocking combination. The scorn of her glance almost with- 
ered the paste diamond in his shirt, and the fair victim warped 
out of anchorage with her ballast shifted to port. 

A FRIEND of mine, a man whose hairs have grown prematurely 
gray, is a man abroad, but a snapping, wolfish cayote at 
home, it was only a few days ago that the wife of this unruly 
man, marking his violent demeanor within the confinements of 
the household, said, with a saddened air: *< You have not been 
the same since your quarrel with that saloon keeper; this change 
of whisky has had an awful effect upon you." I have heard of 
the evil results arising from a change of diet, but this, I think, is 
the first time that a change of whisky was ever regarded as a 
sanitary detriment, assuming for our basis that all whisky is bad. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour, good home and foreign demand : Extras $4.20@$4.30: Superfiue, $3.25. 

Wheat, steady, good trade: Shipping, $1.32^; Milling, $L.37<&$1.40 per ctl. 

Barley, in favor; Brewing, $i.50@*l 55: Feed, $l.45@$1.48 per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, *t.90@$l.95; Feed, $1.7r@?1.90 per ctl. 

Corn, White, $1 30; Yellow, $1.30®$L35 per ctl. 

Rye, light stock, good demand, $1.30@$1.35. 

Hay, free supply; Wheat, $13@$18; Oats, ?11@$14; Alfalfa, $12@$13.50. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $22@$23 per ton. 

Beans, good request, $2.75@$3.40 per ctl. Potatoes, 90c.@?l 25 per ctl. 

Butter is higher ; Choice, 3i»c.@40c. ; Fair, 32},J,«.(ajMoc. : Pickled, : J .0c(ai32>^c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c @13c. Eggs, good supply, 35c.@37J^c 

Honey, Cnmb, 12c.@14c. : Extracted, 6c.@7e. Poultry in good supply. 

Ouious, $3(g)$3.25 per ctl. Beeswax is scarce at 23c.@24c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried — active. Fruit is very plentiful and cbeap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are lower; Dry, 7c@9c. Wool is in demand at 12c.@20c. 

Provisions move off'steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c. (0)6^0. 

Coffee steady at 20c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is less firm, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready bale. 

Quicksilver, slow of sale at $53.50 per flask. Hops are held firmly, 32c.@40c. 

Sugar, good stocK of both Raws and Refined. Steady prices. 

Business afthis season is by no means active. Imports con- 
tinue to be free and liberal. From Kobe, Japan, per ship Rap- 
pahanock, 44 days thence to Williams, Dimond & Co., we are in 
in receipts of 4,400 tons Coal and 1,589 pkgs. Curios. 

The market for Fruit and Vegetables is well supplied. Straw- 
berries are now to be had and all sorts of early spring Vege- 
tables. Apples are abundant and cheap. Oranges and Bananas 
are more than plentiful from Japan and Hawaii respectively, 
while our own Citrus fruit crop is just ripening with some few 
car loads of Oranges already en route for Eastern cities, and 
thousands of car loads to follow on as the season advances. 

The year of 1890 has been one of general prosperity in Cali- 
fornia and we believe equally so with sister States north of us — 
in short the whole Pacific Coast, with which we enjoy in com- 
mon commercial facilities has been correspondingly blessed. The 
year, 1891, opens with many buds of promise. Our Agricul- 
turists are busy plowing and seeding their lands, which are in 
good condition generally. Our Horticulturists are actively en- 
gaged in planting trees and extending their orchards to a vast 
extent, being greatly encouraged thereby by the success they 
have met with during the past year in having secured profitable 
returns and a good market Eastward for their surplus fruit. 
The Citrus fruit crop now rapidly maturing is finding an appre- 
ciative market Eastward for the large crops of Oranges and 
Lemons, while the great success which has attended our Raisin 
and Grape product, as well as that of our Canned and Dried 
Fruit, Jsuts, etc., gives and imparts great encouragement to those 
extensively engaged in the business. 

The American Sugar Refinery has resumed business — a full 
force of employes now employed. This is good news for the 
grocery trade. 

At an early hour on the morning of the 29th December we were 
visited with a short, sharp earthquake, followed later in the day 
with light showers of rain, and in the night succeeding copious 
showers fell much to the delight of all. 

The steamship Australia hence for Honolulu had for Cargo: 
Sugar and 2,908 bags Rice; 7,900 bchs. Bananas, 753 bdls. Hides, 
etc. 

Oregon is now sending to this port considerable Wheat for re- 
shipment to Europe, the steamer Oregon bringing down 5,788 
sks. Wheat, also 5,301 sks. Barley. The Pacific Coast Elevator 
Company cleared the ship Stockbridge, for Antwerp, with over 
3,000 tons Oregon Wheat, and there is more to follow. 

The Produce Exchange having adjourned for a week's holiday, 
business in Wheat and other grains has, of course, been greatly 
restricted of late. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship San Juan, hence for the Isthmus, 
had in transit, for New York, 10,992 lbs. Antimony, 100 bales 
rags, 52,250 gals. Wine, 144 gals. Brandy, etc., value $24,342. 
To Providence, R. L, per same, 150 gals? Brandy. To Brooklyn, 
125 bbls. Glue and 73 gals. Wine. To Washington, 1,010 gals. 
Wine, value $522. Also, per same, to Central America, 6,060 bbls. 
Flour, 21,554 lbs. Beans, 1,890 lbs. Bread, 3,802 lbs. Cinnamon, 
40,000 feet Lumber, 3,448 lbs. Sugar, 8,534 lbs. Tallow, 2,000 gals. 
Wine, 1,000 gals. Whisky, etc., value $52,983. To Mexico, per 
same, 200 bbls. Cement and other Mdse., value $3,375. To Pana- 
ma, per same, 378 bbls. Flour, 20,000 lbs. Rice and other Mdse., 
value $3,825. To South America, 48 gals. Wine, and to Trinidad, 
Beans, Tea, etc., value $303. 

The steamship Belgic for China and Japan sailed hence on the 
30th December with Flour and other merchandise. 

It is somewhat surprising to see the great amount of Poultry, 
Turkeys, Geese, etc., both live and dressed, that are brought 
here by rail across the continent. That which is dressed is gen- 
erally frozen — all of this is brought to a profitable market, or 
else the traffic would not be prosecuted as long and to the ex- 
tent that it is. Nebraska and other localities Eastward also send 
to this Coast immense quantities of Eggs in patent cases. 



zb_a_2st:k:s- 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP. $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,000,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 60 LOMBARD STREET, London. 
Branches— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 

Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver, Nanaimo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
Ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN — Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Indies)-Colonial Bank. 

THE REPUBLIC SAVINGS, BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Incorporated and acting under the laws of California. Charter granted 
for 50 years. Authorized to issue 250,000 shares— par value, $100. 

Capital Subscribed .. $4lO,000. 

A. H. MACDONALD, President. DR. CHARLES E. BLAKE, Vice-Pres't. 
Bank of British Columbia, Treasurer. 

San Francisco Office— 624 Market street. Oakland Office — 471 Ninth street. 
Certificates of Shares issued upon application, earning investor one per 
cent per mouth. All loans made on first-mortgage on real estate. Paid-up 
Stock investors respectfully solicited. Loans of $1,000 payable in monthly 
payments of $16. By-Laws, Prospectus aud Circulars given upon applicatiou. 

THE 6ERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND S 1,610,000 00. 

Deposits July 2, 1890 22,452,140 23. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE ; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGER8 ; Cashier, A. H. P.. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOUKNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, Chas. Meinecke, O. 
Schoemann, E. Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, M. Ehrman. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbob. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Pair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelau, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $800,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEEOME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-PreBident W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Seal Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL 81,000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. P. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jk. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Pbebident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. "W. or. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $450,000. 
Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.). No. 10 Wall St., N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule- 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Managers. 

C. Altschpl, Cashier. __ 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited, 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 1 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. FRED. F. LOW, ) Manft ™ 8 

IGN. STEINHART.i aan ^ erSl 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



S.\N KCAN.isco NEWS LETTER. 



i: 



VRoS 




B^nsrics. 



SYMPATHY.- Tnunion Courier. 

LIKE dew unto the thirsty flowers, 
When drooping 'nenlh a burning sky, 
80 to the heart in sorrow's hours 

Is the tear of earnest sympathy. 
Though thickly over us clouds may gather, 
And in our pathway thorns may spring, 
When one we love bears half the load. 
It takes away their sharpest sling. 

Like the soft moonbeam's silvery light, 

Glancing upon an angry sea, 
Soothing with saddened rays, yet bright, 

The turmoil raging wild and free; 
So with the billows of the soul: 

When roused by grief they madly rage; 
Sympathy's kind loving tones 

Will the great trouble soon assuage. 

This great and ever-changing world 

Would be a desert dark and drear 
If none would answer back our smiles, 

Or wipe for us the falling tear. 
Earth's blossoms could not bring us gladness 

It's trials we could never bear, 
Unless a dear one shared our joys 

And lightened half our grief and care. 



THE SUMMER DAYS ARE DONE.— Speaker. 

No bluer sky was ever seen 

When summer mornings first unfold; 
The woods and fields are fresh and green, 

And in a haze of gold. 
But what though woods and fields are fair, 

And bright with yonder rising san? 
The breath of Autumn's in the air: 

The Summer days are done. 

Now Autumn comes with falling leaves, 
That one by one the ways bestrow; 

And Winter with its icy leaves 
And fields of silent snow. 

Fair seasons both, but yet to-day 

I think on that whose race is run; 

And to myself I sigh and say 
"The Summer days are donel" 



THE OASIS.— Pittsburg Bulletin. 

Does sight deceive? are yonder palms outlined 
Against the lurid sky as desert dream? 
How often has a fair elusive gleam 

Of foliage lured us! Now the freshening wind 

Fans their slim fronds, and shadows cool and kind 
Await before. The camels scent the stream 
Of welcome waters. Soon the day orb's beam 

Our hot and aching eyes no more will blind. 

How soft the greensward is! and O what bliss 
To feel upon our lips the water's kiss! 

And bark ! as clear as Hafiz heard in Fharz 
The nightingale salutes the day's calm close, 
The while we seek the guerdon of repose, 

Our tent the night, our lights the watchful stars. 



ON THE ROAD.— New York Tribune. 



The fields are all sweet with hay, 

The brakes are all blithe with song, 

On the hedges rose garlands sway, 
Convolvulus clusters throng, 

As shoeless, and tattered, and grimy, and gray, 
He shuffles along. 

A skylark Bings high above, 

A thrush from yon hanging bough, 

Far away in the wood a dove; 

But he passes with scowling brow. 

Their melodies once he was wont to love, 
He hates them now. 

Hates all, save the sheltering night, 

When under a bank he creeps, 
And Squalor is out of sight, 

And Hunger its distance keeps, 
And unmocked by the birds and the meadows bright, 
His misery sleeps. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 
c»»tt»i $3.ooo.oon 00 

St""? 1 "*, . „ ., 1.000.0CO 00 

Undivided Proflta (July l.-t. MM) 2 091568 76 

WM 1LVORD, President. 

Thohab Brown. .rubier I B. Murray, jr .Aaalhiani nuiiin 



AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency o( the Bank of California: B03TON-Tremont 
National Hank; CHICAGO I nlou National Hank; ST. LOUIS— Boalman'a 
Bank. NEW ZEALAND— The [tank nf New Zealand. Correspondent In 
Loudon— Heasra. N. M. Rothschild A Bona. Correspondents in India. Chlua 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents lu all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit Issued, available In all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Deuver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfortou-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, .Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hougkoug 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities In Italy and Switzerland. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



N. W. Corner Sausoine and IIunU Streets. 

Established 1870. rj s. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAW UP) $1, 600,000 

SURPLUS $500,000 [ UNDIVIDED PROFITS $69,200 

8. G. MURPHY. President! E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT. . . . Vice-President I GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins. S. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelau, James Moffitt. 

Jas. H. Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per anuum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for tlie care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
Btorage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Authorized Capital ?3,600,000 

Reserve 



Capital paid up 2,-150,000 

345,000 



San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard St., E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1006 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV PRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan 4 Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: Chas. Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Ccr. of Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Savings Bank deposits received, and interest paid on same semi annually, 
in January and July. Ratesof interest for the LastThree Terms: 5.58 per 
cent on term deposit and 4.65 per cent on ordinary deposits, free of tax. 
Deposits received from one dollar upwards. Open Saturday Evenings. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $5,000,000.00 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and. W. F. Goad. H. Wadswortn, Cashier. 
Receive DepositB, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, - 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated . November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH c. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



<E&. &£&m 




MAYOR POND is faring ill with his vetoes of late. Nine votes 
are too many for his logic. Shag Rock will become the 
city's property. How would it do to have the incoming Board 
offer the " rock " for sale? If it be true that the city "must" 
have the rock because it furnishes the only available site, surely 
those who are now urging its purchase will be ready to buy, of 
course, in the expectation that inasmuch as the city " must " have 
it, it will in the end have to buy it back at their own figure. The 
only thing to be wondered at is, that in view of the many and 
triumphant announcements to the effect of Shag Rock being the 
only available small pox hospital site, its creation in ages past 
has as yet not been seized upon as a pulpit theme, as demonstrat- 
ing the guiding hand of Providence in thus carefully providing 
the rock. What, indeed, would become of San Francisco if "Shag 
Rock " did not exist? 

There would seem to be much room for improvement in the 
statutes regulating street railroads. Thus, for instance, it was 
announced during the week that the California Street Railroad 
was compelled to pay a handsome sum to the North Beach and 
.Mission Road for the privilege of running its cars to the foot of 
California street. One should think from this transaction that 
California street is not an open public street, but the property of 
the North Beach and Mission Road, rights upon and along which 
can be obtained only by the payment of hard cash in sums satis- 
factory to the seller. The North Beach Road itself acquired this 
supposed right by the grant of a franchise allowing it to lay 
tracks and run cars, and this right was granted it, not because it 
was intended to invest it with valuable privileges which it might 
sell or lease, but because the railroad which it p'romised to ope- 
rate was to be a public convenience. The matter of profit was 
but incidental. In theory, indeed, the question of public con- 
venience is the only one that governs in the matter of street rail- 
road franchises, and accordingly it would seem that if public 
convenience would be served by an extension of the California 
Street Cable system to the foot of California street, that then the 
" proprietary rights " of the North Beach should not be allowed 
to stand in the way, so long as public convenience, as served by 
the North Beach Road, is not interfered with by the California 
Street Road. The purchase and sale of railroad rights on public 
streets between companies should not be allowed, for if the right 
have a pecuniary value the people should be held entitled to the 
price. This was the view which Judge Mchtinstry took when on 
the Supreme Bench, and since his successors in office saw fit to 
overrule his decision, establishing the law to be otherwise, it 
might be well for the Legislature to interdict once for all all sales, 
assignments, or leases of railroad franchises, by enacting a statute 
to that effect. 

The real estate market has simmered down to very small pro- 
portions, indeed, during the week. Nothing else, of course, was 
to be expected at this season of the year. At present, business 
is almost wholly confined to dealings in "poor man's " property. 
The sales of this class of land continue quite large, despite the 
holidays, and from this fact those interested draw the conclusion 
that, after New Year's, trade will develop as never before, and 
that the market will become one of the most active San Fran- 
cisco has ever known. All real estate men certainly harbor great 
expectations, and it must be confessed that, if nothing unfavor- 
able happens in the financial world, the prospects seem to warrant 
their hopes. Business just now is confined to small trades. With 
the man who wants to buy a cheap lot as an investment for his 
savings, the holiday season is an incentive to buy rather than 
otherwise. And it needs but a glance at the daily records to 
show that the man with small means does not let the holidays in- 
terfere with his purchases. 

But sales of magnitude have become rare indeed. The follow- 
ing sales fairly show the complexion of the market. Downtown 
there were sold 20:8x59:9 on the north side of Commercial street, 
102:8 feet east of Montgomery; 137:6x137:6, less an L of 69x67 ;6 
on the northeast corner of Bush and Powell streets, and 30x66 on 
the north side of Sutter street, 137 :6 feet east of Stockton. In the 
northern part of the Western Addition there were sold 35x87:6 
on the northwest corner of Larkiif and Lombard streets; 126x275 
on the northwest corner of Scott and Lombard streets and all of 
block -115, the last two parcels being purchased by the Distilling 
and Cattle Feeding Company, a new enterprise, which has also ac- 
quired considerable property in South San Francisco. 

The leading sales in the Western Addition were: 55:3x137:6 on 
the north side of Francisco street, 124 feet east of Franklin; 50x 
137:6 on the south side of O'Farrell street, 62:6 feet east of 
Octavia, and 137:6x137:6 on the northeast corner of Hayes and 
Lyon streets. 

In Outside Lands there were sold, as wholes, block 820, block 
981; the eastern halves of blocks 722 and 723; all of block 916, 
less 120x120, constituting the northeasterly corner; all of block 
1059; the southeasterly 182:6x180 in block 355; all of block 998; 
also, block 211, with certain exceptions, 375x100 on the south- 
west corner of Twentieth avenue and G street, and all of block 369. 



ST. MATTHEWS' HALL, 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS! 



Twenty-fifth Year. Easter Term commences Thursday, January 8, 1891. 

REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Rector. 



TYLER HALL. 



Preparatory Department of St. Matthew's Hall, San Mateo, California 
FOR YOUNG BOYS. 



Easter Session will commence THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 1891. 
For catalogues and full information address 

REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Rector. 

Dr. Ricord's Restorative Pills. 



Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. 

Agents for California and the Pacific States, 

J. G. STEELE «S CO., 
No. 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 

Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, ?1 25; of 100 pills, ?2; of 200 pill 
$3 50; of 400 pills, ?6; Preparatory Pills, $2. 

Send for Circular. 




Hammond Typewriter, 




Ideal and Universal 

KEY-BOARD. 

See the New Universal. 

Supplies and Repairs for all Machines. 
SC OTT &. BANNAN, 213 Sansome Street, S. F. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING. OILS AND 8UPPLIE8. 



ESTABLISHED 1854. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PRIVATE TRADE SOLICITED. 
39 Clay Street, - - - San Francisco. 

THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

GIANT POWDER OR DYNAMITE, NOBEL'S GELATINE, GELATINE 

DYNAMITE of various grades, JDDSON POWDER IMPROVED, 

BLACK BLASTING POWDER, CAPS AND FUSE. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., - - - General Agents 

30 California Street. 



LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

CABTE BLAlfTCHE." 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 
"G-ttJLNJD ATIItsr SEC," 

(BROWN LABEL) 7 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 
See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO. f 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




Jan. 3, 1891. 



3 \\ PR INCTSCO M'ws LETTER 



19 



THE BJURSE AND UNDERWRITER 

ikt. January 8, 1881. 

T BULB to walling and gnashing o( tMtfa among thi Insurance 
offices this week, on Account of the annual MutetnrnH now 
being ma<ir. When it i* aodentood that each ol the 8t*t«fl "f the 
Dnlon In which a company dow basinan roQQlrss a statement of 
the year'.-* bvatnan from that Company, ami that all these state- 
nienta are different in form and details, some idea of the work re- 
quired may be gained. Wax some "f the larger Companies from 
forty to forty-five statements are necessary. Some underwriters 
think it would be an excellent idea to have a National Insurance 
Commissioner, with headquarter* at Washington whose approval 
of a statement would be sufficient for all purposes In all the States 
and Territories in which the Company did business. Such apian 
would reduce expense* considerably and facilitate business great- 
ly. It would, also, however, do away with a number of places 
into which political workers may be softly dropped, and therefore 
ita adoption may be looked on as chimerical. 

If the street rumors be given credence there will certainly be a 
large number of changes in local agencies, after January has be- 
gun to check off its days on the calendar. From all accounts, sev- 
eral changes in foreign offices may be looked for before February. 
What they will be cannot yet be told, for the ways of home offices 
are devious and fnll of mysteries. 

" We are glad that the year is over," said a well-known marine 
man to me on Wednesday. " It has been a bad one, and our best 
wishes for ourselves and our rivals is that 1891 will end with a 
smaller column of losses. The storms during the year have played 
havoc with oar probabilities of profits. Only last week we paid 
off on our old friend, the Stmthearn, That vessel will only be 
found at the bottom. Now we are anxiously awaiting tidings of 
the Malaysia and the Dean field. Ninety-five per cent, is now freely 
offered on the vessels, with no takers. The Malaysia left here on 
August 6, 1890, for Cork, loaded with 62.742 centals of wheat. 
She was cleared by Eppinger & Co. She is an iron vessel of 1,827 
tons register. She was in the gale encounted by the Ventura and 
the Queen Victoria, which sent both those vessels back to port in 
distress. The Malaysia's cargo was valued at about $80,000, and 
was fully covered in this city. The Deanjield was a British iron 
bark of 1,072 tons, which sailed from this port, on June 11, 1890, 
with a cargo of general merchandise, bound for Hamburg. Her 
cargo was valued at $91,240, and, like that of the Malaysia, was 
fully covered in this city. It is generally believed that the Dean- 
jield was the vessel seen by the ship Mentone, which, on its arrival 
at Glasgow, reported having seen an iron bark of about 1,100 tons 
on the rocks near Cape Horn. The Mentone passed through a lot 
of wreckage near the Cape, which may have been the remnants 
of the missing Deanjield. Considerable anxiety has also been felt 
over the Anna, which also passed through a very heavy storm. 
She was recently sighted, however, much to the relief of the Under- 
writers." 

Harry B. Syz has been appointed agent of the Belsese Fire In- 
surance Company. 

Among recent marine losses reported is that of the bark Ata- 
lanta, which foundered in a gale off Cape Flattery on December 
16th last. She belonged to Pope & Talbot of this city, and was 
bound from Port Gamble to this city with lumber. Capt. Mosher, 
who has traded on this coast for years, says the gale was the 
most severe he ever experienced. Pope & Talbot's bark Bonanza, 
had an escape from another severe storm. She was bound from 
Australia to Port Townsend in ballast, and encountered a furious 
gale on November 18th, during which she lost her foretop topgal- 
lant mast, main topgallant mast, and jib-boom. The Bonanza was 
eighty-four days on her passage when she put into this port on 
Christmas day, and until within a few days of San Francisco she 
had encountered a succession of storms. 

Following are losses on the Slrathearn: Standard Marine, $125,- 
720; Swiss Marine, $75,000' Madgeburg General, $38,580; British 
and Foreign, $18,790; United of Canton, $8,860. 

Nearly $3,000 worth of navigators' instruments, sails and sun- 
dries were taken from the wrecked Norwegian bark Straum a 
few" days since. 

The bark Ferris S. Thompson, which arrived here on Tuesday in 
distress from Nanaimo, had a very narrow escape from Davy 
Jones' locker. She was bound for Kahului, and on December 
8th encountered a very severe gale off Cape Flattery, and after 
plowing through the heavy seas for. twenty-four hours she sprung 
a leak, and had to put into this port for salvation. 

Secretary. 



B 



UY Jos. Tetley & Co's " Elephant" brand of Ceylon and India 
Teas in lead packets. Unadulterated, fragrant, delicious. 



PoisON-OAKcaredbySteele's&rindeliaLotion.TwentyyearB'experience 
has proved this remedyto be SiSpeciftc. Apply immediately after returning 
fromapienicexcursion.aadtbe dreaderuptionwillbeprevented. James 
G. Steele & Go. .635 Market* tree t. 

W. G. Badger, sole agent for Hallet, Davis & Co. , W. W. Kimball 
& Co., celebrated pianos and organs, removed to History Building, 
725 Market street, ground floor. 



DAUPHIN! DAUPHIN! DAUPHIN! 



Any p*non Irauacting baataow up in the Bill ■ ■( lanutrj with 

M. A. DAUPHIN, of New Orleans, 

CAN SEND 

Package containing not less than Five Dollars, 

BY EXrilliSS. PKBB OK EXPENSE. 



SOIRI 



Government Lands Located without Settlement or Residence. 



Anypartof FIVE THOUSAND (5000) ACRES OF SCRIP FOR SALE, which 
can be located upon any unoccupied Government Land, 

SURVEYED OR UNSURVEY'ED, IN CALIFORNIA, 

In Tracts of Forty Acres and upwards. 

TITLES TO SUSPENDED ENTRIES can also lie obtained. 

Address 

W. E. DARGIE, 

Tribune Office, Oakland, Cal. 
Or, McAFEE, BALDWIN & HA MMOND, 10 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of Die Board of Directorsgof this society, held THIS 
DAY, a dividend has been declared at the rale of lki per ceut per annum 
on all deposits for the six months euding December 31, 1890, free from all 
taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1891. R. J. TOB1N, Sec. 

OFFfCE— Northeast coruer Montgomery and Post Streets, S. F., Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 

For the half year ending with 31st December, 1890, a dividend has been 

declared at the rate of five and four-tenths {5 4-10) per cent per annum on 

term deposits and four and one-half {4]4) per cent per annum on ordinary 

deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after FRIDAY, id January, 1891. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Office— 532 California street, corner Webb. Branch, 1700 Market street, 
coruer Folk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and. Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and fifty-eight hundredths (5 58-100) per cent per annum 
on Term Deposits, and four and sixty-five hundredths, (4 65-IijO) per cent 
per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, and payable on and after 
FRIDAY, January 2, 18J1. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Coruer of Powell and Eddy streets. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five and forty-hundredths (5 40-100) per cent per annum ou 

term deposits, and four and one-half (4]4) per ceut per annum on ordinary 

deposits, payable on aud after FRIDAY, January 2, 1891 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— No. 526 California street, San Francisco. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



People's Home Savings B^nk. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of P ive and Fi fty-two One-huudredths (5.52*) per cent per annum 
on Term Deposits, and Four and Sixty Oue-hundredths (4,60) per cent per 
annum ou Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on aud after Friday, 
January 2, 1891. B. O. CARR, Secretary. 

Office— No. 805 Market street, Flood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five and Four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and Four and One-half (4J.£) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, aud payable on and after Friday, January 2, 1891. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— No. 619 Clay Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The Mutual Savings Bank, of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five aud Four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and Four and One-half (4%) percent per annum, on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, January 2, 1891. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 
Office— No. 33 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




^MmyjfaMs^iiJ. 



TH I Pharmaceutical Era says that not an ounce of Bolivia's cas- 
carilla ever went to the United States; it is all sent to Europe, 
via the Straits of Magellan. Notwithstanding the vast number 
of quina trees in the country and the cheapness of the raw ma- 
terial, there is no spot on earth where quinine, as prepared in the 
form of medicine, is so expensive. Though the people require a 
great deal of it in cases of mountain fever, terciana, etc., none is 
made in Bolivia. When the bark that is grown here and exported 
for next door to nothing gets back in the form of quinine it becomes 
a " foreign product," has exorbitant duties to pay and sells accord- 
ingly. Whereas in other lands it yields the druggist a profit of 
about SO per cent, when retailed at lc. a grain, it sells in La Paz at 
the rate of 10c. per grain. If some enterprising Northerner would 
set up an establishment in this city for extracting the alkaloid 
from the bark, his fortune would soon be made. 

It is strangely interesting at the present moment to note 

that Darwin foresaw and predicted Dr. Koch's discovery, uncon- 
sciously playing even on the name of the " consumption curer." 
Some years before his death Darwin was one day talking to Mrs. 
Richmond Ritchie (Miss Thackeray), who was then in great 
anxiety aboufone of her children, suffering from measles. Dar- 
win consoled her as best he could, and added: "Some day, before 
long, all diseases will be cured by inoculation. The germ theory 
will be worked out on animals, and the cocks and hens will teacb 
us how to treat scarlatina and all the other diseases which now 
carry off so many victims." 

- ■ In a report by Dr. C. Hart Merriam to the Division of Orni- 
thology and Mammology of the Department of Agriculture, treat- 
ing of the fauna and flora of the mountain regions of Arizona, 
some new views are advanced in regard to the proper division of 
the North American continent into areas of animal and vegetable 
life. The author maintains that there are but two primary life 
areas in North America: a northern or boreal area, and a southern 
or sub-tropical area, both extending completely across the con- 
tinent, with interpenetrating areas of various lengths. The ordi- 
nary division made by naturalists has been that of the east- 
ern, central and western areas, but this, according to Dr. Merriam, 
must be abandoned. 

A new method of producing artificial fuel consists in the 

mixing of ground corn stalks and spadices with coarse prairie 
grass. The mixture is made into a coarse dough by means of water 
and vigorous stirring up. The dough is then put into proper molds 
and exposed to an even drying process under high pressure. 
Hereby pieces are produced in the form and size of briquettes, 
but which look green gray. These stones, when thoroughly dry, 
are sold as fuel. They give greater and cheaper heat than bitu- 
minous coal, and are, besides, from 20 to 25 per cent, cheaper. 

— Dr. Kabierski, of Breslau, has invented a novel percussor 
in the form of a tuning-fork with a cylindrical stem, which is 
held between the finger and thumb, and thin prongs with rounded 
free extremities for striking the surface of the body. He claims 
for this instrument that it distinguishes smaller areas from one an- 
other than the ordinary method ef mediate percussion can do. 
He has mapped out by its means the varying movements of the 
apices of the lungs, and believes that he has shown that the 
boundaries of cardiac dullness, as usually given, require to be some- 
what modified. — Lancet. 

The drain of centuries upon Siberia for furs is telling at 

last, and, in West Siberia there is now great scarcity, the supply 
coming chiefly from the eastern portion of the huge province, 
whilst for the natives of Obdorsk, the chief market town for 
those employed in the trade of hunting, beaver furs from Khams- 
chatka, and prepared in Germany, are largely imported. Obdorsk 
is the principal fur depot, and the most important trade is done 
in squirrels, of which 70,000 skins are annually sold, and white 
foxes. 

The Astronomer-Royal, in England, ,has been informed of 

the discovery of another comet, the fifth seen this year, by M. 
■ Lona, of the Palermo Observatory. It is said to be tolerably 
bright, and favorably situated for observation in the northern 
hemisphere by astronomers in Europe and America provided with 
moderate-sized telescopes. 

A system of electric cabs has been introduced in Stuttgart, 

with a degree of success that promises the permanent relegation 
of the cab horse to other fields of usefulness. The new vehicles 
are already popular, though, at present, their novelty ha? much 
to do with the patronage they receive. 

The group of bodies termed by chemists the carbo-hydrates, 

because they are composed of carbon united with oxygen and hy- 
drogen in the proportion in which those two elements combine to 
form water — contain the well-known series of sugars, gums and 
starches. 

The earth's population doubles in two hundred years. 






Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibit 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

216 Sansome Street, S. F. 
INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n.$3,033,420.31 1 Reinsurance Reserve t 251.182.68 

Assets January 1, 1890 . . 821.517.09 Capital paid up, Gold . . 300,00000 
Surplus for policy holders 810,567.09 I Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 244,884.41 

Income in 1889 $389,971.75 | Fire Losses paid in 1889. tl92,375.28 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1890 10,359.00 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. . . . J. L. N. SHEPARD I General Agent R. H. MAGILL 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full I 200.000.00 

ASSETS, December 31, 1889 406,003.99 

LOSSES Paid In 18 Years (Since Organization) 2,463,080.77 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 

Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

Capital S1.500.000.00 

Net surplus 389,266.70 

Assets January 1, 1890 1,511,557.70 

Invested in U.3 517,406.73 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

fW" General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed f 10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve rund fin addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124,057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 19,260.000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1.398,546 

•wnyr:. 3ycA.cx10iiTA.Xji3, 

GENERAL AGENT, 
315 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Prance. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital 5,000 000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable ia all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. 8YZ, Agent, 410 California 
Btreet. San Francisco. 

THE PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1868. 
LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE. 

Principal Office, 418 California Street, San Francisco- 
Assets, January 1st, 1890 $2,150,000.00 

Surplus 314,000.00 

Paid Policyholders In twenty years. 4,400,000.00 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER &HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

COKE— CHEAPEST FUEL! 

Reduction in Price. 

Wholesale (50 bbla. or more), 80c. per bbl. Retail (any quantity 

under 50 bbls.), 90c per bbL 

AT THE WORKS OF 

THE SAN FRANCISCO GASLIGHT COMPANY, 
HOWARD AND FIRST STS., and FOOT OF SECOND STREET. 




SKW: 



I ETTEP. 



21 



*T.\M.KV WM ■ W-1-hnian, 
St*nlcj was- ft chief; 
Stanley went to Africa 

To bring Kmin rehef. 
When he roI t<> \ 

Knun would n,. i comt ; 
be t«» V ik a lot "f black men 
To fetch the beggar home. 
Hut Ktnin was a "caution," 

And Stanley >ay- ; " NodOttbt, 
I once «li'l find poor Bmln in. 

But now I've found him oat!" 

— London Topical Times. 
— Thi> i> what be said : " « »h ! saccharine conglomeration of pro- 
toplasm, wonderful combination of matter and forte, earnest product 
of infinite ages of evolution ! Deign, oh most admirable creature, to 
respect that attraction which draws me toward thee with a force in- 
versely proportionate to the s-iuares of the distance, and grant that 
we may each be made double suns, describing concentric orbits 
which shall touch each other at all points of their peripheries," and 
then she fainted. Can any one wonder? 

A certain country clergyman happened to say, in the course of 

his sermon, " Commentators do not agree with me on this point.'' 
The next day one of his parishioners came to him, wheeling a barrow 
full of potatoes, which he said he had brought as a present. His 
rector thanked him warmly, but asked him what it was that made 
him think of such a present. " Why, sir, said the man, " I heard 
you say yesterday that common UUers did not agree with you." 

She was tall and she was slender, 

And 1 loved her as ray life; 
She was of the weaker gender, 

Her I called ray love, my wife. 
Now she sleeps beneath the daisies, 

And her soul is in the blue; 
Now for this ray heart sings praises — 

I've a chance ot sleeping, too. — Truth. 

He (desperately) — Tell rae the truth. Is it not my poverty that 

stands between us? She (sadly) — Y-e-S. He (with a ray of hope) — I 
admit that 1 am poor, and so, unfortunately, is ray father; but I 
have an aged uncle, who is very rich and a bachelor. He is au in- 
valid and cannot long survive. She (delightedly) — How kind and 
thoughtful you are! Will you introduce me to him? 

— New York Weekly. 

In Court: " So, Mr. Meyer, you want a separation from your 

wife? What is your ground?" "An unconquerable averson." 
'■ And you, Mrs. Meyer, also want a separation, and your reasons?" 
" An unconquerableaversion." "With such a harmony of feeling 
as you seem to have, I must advise you to remain together." 

— FUegendc Blatter. 

In days of old, so chroniclers do say, 

Maids helped their mothers in a household way. 

Now times have changed: the maid for culture wishes, 

And reads her book while mother cleans the dishes. 

" Mamma, what is the use of keeping the whip you use on me 

behind the motto, ' God Bless Our Home?' " " Can you suggest a 
better place?" "Yes, mamma; put it behind the motto, ' I Need 
Thee Every Hour.' " 

"I had a splendid time in my vacation this last summer. 

Meals just when I wanted them, cold and warm baths, and no fees 
for waiters or porters." "And where is this ideal place, doctor?" 
" I stayed at home." 

" Where are you going, my pretty maid?" 

" I am going to sneeze, kind sir," she said. 

" And at whom will you sneeze, my pretty maid ?" 

"Atchoo! Atchoo! kind sir," she said. 

— Birmingham Leader. 

"But, Carl, how can you drink so much beer?" " I drink it as 

a reward of virtue, for, yon see, 1 drank milk for a whole year." 
14 Yon did! And what year was that, pray?" "My first, of 
course." 

Father (gazing at his new infant)-^-You say that baby looks like 

me? Nurse (enthusiastically)— Sure, sir, it's the very image of you. 
Father (seizing his hat)— Then I'm off to a dime museum to pose as a 
freak. 

" Do you think, young man, that you could give my daughter 

all she asks for?" questioned papa, grimly. " 1— aw— think so, sir," 
murmured the lover, bashfully. " She says she wants only me." 

— Harper's Bazar. 

Perhaps some day we shall see the earth 

Inherited by the meek; 
But just at present this globe is owned 
By the fellow with lots of cheek. 

Professor of Psychology— We can't conceive of anything as be- 
ing out of time and still occupying space. Musical Student— Yes, sir, 
a bad singer in a chorus. 

The man who marries a millionaire's daughter Jdoes not have 

to wait fifty years for a golden wedding. 

—There are two things that always make a man dream— mince 
pie and love. 

Always getting to the front— the back of your necktie. 



IlSTGTTK^lsrCIHJ. 



RREMAJp FUKQ 



CAPITAL 



Insurance Company. 

(1. 000.000. | ASSETS 



12.560.000. 



5;.r\? TA, '- E8 it.-.i.i,.i,i 

WILLIAM J. DOT roH Wee Pnxldent. 

B. FAYMONVII.I.K S,,r,.„rv. 

liEOKO,. II. TYBON 1 

J. u. llvimdn . MatIqo Beorolary. 

Agent, la nil prominent localities throuithont the United 8tate». 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

fiee and :M:.A.iai2sr:E. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AND 220 SANS0ME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
GEORGE L. BRANDER, CHA8. H. CUSHING, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Dike obs— D. Callaghau, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. it .ldsteiu, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. F. Buckley, Dr. lm. Jones, G. H. Wheaton, T. McMulliu, H. H. Watson 

H. Dimond, P. Bola 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Rovtl 

Charter 1720.] J 

Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.) 
Connecticut F're Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 

CAPITAL AND ASSETS $4,694,983 00 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

ASSETS 10,581,953 00 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford. 

ASSETS 2,443,937 33 

GEO. D. DORNIN, Manager. WM. SEXTON, Assistant Manager. 

214 Sansome Street. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. | C ASH ASSETS INC. 8... $746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $30,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $16,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

THE LANCASHIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
GEORGE STEWART, - - - General Manager. 

Guaranteed Capital $15,000,000 OO 

Assets 7,852,366 69 

All information in regard to the Company may he obtained from 
MANN & WILSON, 
General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San Francisc o. 

THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.45. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




318 CliFornih. cB T - 

§F{tT fRRNClJjCO 



^Company? y - 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 







Q 



"a Cigarette Maker's Romance," by F. Marion Crawf rd— MacMillan 
& Co., New York and Loudon. 

iN this novel the author makes amendment to his readers for 
more than one painful tragedy in the past by a tale of finely 
pathetic interest, which might have ended in gloom and disaster, 
but which comes to the happiest possible conclusion. Mr. Craw- 
ford has introduced in this story one of the subtlest and least 
understood phases of insanity, the constant recurrence of the 
idee fixe, but he has treated it in such a manner as to carefully 
avoid the subtleties and intricacies of the modern science of 
psychology for which there is certainly no place in fiction. 
Every story Mr. Crawford writes is thoroughly imbued with 
the spirit of the country of its characters. In this last work he 
writes as conversantly of the life of the employees of a tobacco 
shop, as he did of the Italian nobles, and the narrative is marked 
by the same clear and vigorous style as all bis former efforts. 
The whole action of the story occupies only forty hours in 
which is the record of the few characters comprised, but it is 
enough to stamp them indelibly on the memory. We commend 
this book to all lovers of the pure in literature. 

"The Discovery of America," by Warren Holden.— J. B. Lippincott 
Philadelphia. 

This little poem by Warren Holden, is one of the best that has 
come to our notice for some time. It is quite classical in style 
and even those who are not particular lovers of the poet's art 
could read this poem for improvement and profit, and it is quite 
likely that a study of it would lead to a cultivation of a taste in 
this direction. This is just the kind of verse for teachers to place 
in the hands of pupils to commit to memory, and we think when 
it is known, it will become a standard work. 



The Arena for January contains some thoughtful essays on the 
vital problems of the hour, all of which can be read with great 
interest and profit. In succeeding issues of this magazine there 
is to be a well written story, pointing some mora!, or vividly il- 
lustrating some great truth. With this new feature, the maga- 
zine will be more attractive than ever, as a rest after perusing the 
more thoughtful essays. 

The Cosmopolitan for January is excellent, as usual. It con- 
tains the first of two parts of the new novel by Mrs. Van Renssa- 
laer Kruger, whose " Diplomat's Diary " and ' A Successful Man," 
which latter, first published in the Cosmopolitan, excited much 
comment both in America and Europe. The number is replete 
with instructive and entertaining matter. The publishers state 
that the December issue reached the 100,000 mark. 



West by South, Half South. — This latest work published by 
the Southern Pacific Company, filled with artistic illustrations, 
eclipses anything of the kind heretofore issued by a railroad com- 
pany. There are views on the entire route from New Orleans to 
San Francisco, with interesting descriptions and much valuable 
information. This should be on every library table. 

Current Literature comes to us this month in a new form — the 
broad page is discarded for the size and style of the regular mag- 
azines. This publication is in some respect like the '< Review of 
Reviews," and for those who have not much spare time for read- 
ing, is very useful in saving the necessity of wading through a 
mass of other literature to find out that best suited to one's fancy. 
Short Stories, published by ths same company, is also to appear in 
the same form. 

Good Housekeeping, which is now issued as a monthly instead 
of a fortnightly, should find a place in every well ordered house- 
hold. It has a more substantial value in the home than other pub- 
lications of the sensational style, which appeal for the same sup- 
port and which rely on the puffery style.. This publication has 
the honest and substantial flavor that belongs to the best things 
of New England, and will be found always useful to have at hand 
by good housekeepers. 

The Chape rome, published by the Gast Company, of St. Louis, is 
a new magazine candidate for public favor. It is splendidly 
printed, and the articles on art, music, literature, science, home 
decoration, humor, cuisine, children, outing and dress are all up 
to the mark. This is likely to take a prominent place among the 
monthlies. 



J. F. C otter's old Bourbon. -This celebrated Whisky is for sale by al 
druggists and first-class grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 



Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
Childreu while Teething. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



Rainbow Crepe Kimonos at Marsh's, under Palace Hotel. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Consolidated Imperial Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the thirteenth day of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 30) of Five 
(5) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 329 Pine street, room 3, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Sixteenth day of January, 1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the ninth day of February, 1891, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 

Office— No. 329 Piue street, room 3, San Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 



Exchequer Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of Business — San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 11th day of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 30) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Fifteenth Day of January, 1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the fifth day of February, 1891, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Keniuck Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
onthe29th day of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 23) of Thirty-five Cents 
(35c) per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Compauy, No. 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco. Cat. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Third Day of February ,1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Wednesday, the twenty-fifth day of February, 1891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directora. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Piue street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the third day of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 53) of Fifty Cents 
50c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of tbe Company, room 3, Sau Francisco Stock Exchange Building, 
No. 331 Pine street, Sau Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Seventh (7th) day of January 1891. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, wil-1 be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 28th day of January, 1891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEW-LANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, San Francisco Stock Exchange Building, No. 321 Pine 
street, San Francisco, California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bullion Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the company, room 20, No. 327 Pine 
street, San Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 8th day of January, 1 891 . at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Trausfer books will close on Saturday, the 3d day of January, 1891, at 3 
o'clock P. M. 

R. R GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 20, S. F. Stock Exchange Building, 327 Pine street, San 
Francisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Brunswick Consoli- 
dated Gold Mining Co. will be held at the office of the compauy, Room 
56, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 8th day of January, 1 891 , at (he hour of 2 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors for the ensuing year, and 
for such other business as may be brought before the meeting. 

J. STADTFELD, Jr., Secretary. 



ARTHUR W. MOORE. 



H*bry F. Woods. 
Member Stock and Bond Exchange. 



WOODS & MOORE, 

STOCK AM) BOND BROKERS. 



Investment securities of all kinds bought and sold on commission. Lib- 
eral advances made on approved securities. Stocks carried on margin. 

No. 438 California Street, S. F. 



Jan. 8, 1S91. 



BAN PRAN( tS( NEWS LETTER. 







TBBmab <»f Bngltsh people to the Riviere is bringing up the 
of gambling at Monte Carlo again. In the virtuous fits 
of this question it elweys affords tl • striking example 

of whet they pretend la the English nMurel and national hy- 
pocrisy. No people gamble, whether at cards or over horses or 
.-. more than the English, yel they are never weary of de- 
ploring the existence of the roulette tables in the charming little 
principality. It is. consequently, rather refreshing to find an 
Englishman arguing in their favor. A writer in the Time.* Bays, 
that the If lite Carlo administration provides £400,000 •• in sup- 
port of law, justice, religion and charity." This is a good deal 
more than the Newmarket bookmakers attempt in the way of 
social good. Gambling at the CercU <U» Etrangers is, after all, only 
a pastime for the rich. 

Here is the way Froude sums up Lord Beaconsfield's character 
in his monograph on that interesting character: " Disraeli failed, 
as he deserved to fail. He thought that he was reviving patriotic 
enthusiasm, and all that he did was to create jingoism. ... No 
public man in Eugland ever rose so high and acquired power so 
great, so little of whose work has survived him. . . . Possibly 
if, among bis other gifts, he had inherited an English character, 
be might have devoted himself more completely to great national 
questions; he might even have inscribed his name in the great 
roll of English worthies. But he was English only by adoption, 
and he never completely identified himself with the country 
which he ruled. At heart he was a Hebrew to the end." 



The financial accounts of the passion play in Oberammergau 
show that the receipts were 700.000 marks and the net profit 300,- 
000 marks. Two thousand marks were paid to Maier, who 
enacted the principal part; 1,300 to the Mayor, " Caiaphas," and 
as much to his daughter, " Mary; " Peter and Pilate 500 marks 
each, and the others less in proportion down to the cock, who 
only got 50 marks for crowing the whole summer. But the village 
is dissatisfied. Taxes are being levied at the same time for the 
State and for the parish, and the portions of the players are very 
much reduced. In Munich the opinion is expressed that the pas- 
sion plays will have an ugly sequel. 

The Prince of Wales, it is said, intends next season to introduce 
a reform in the dinner hour. The fashionable hour of dining has, 
in recent years, been getting later and later, and it is now gener- 
ally half-past eight, and often nine o'clock. The Prince will, it 
is said, fix the hour for dinner at eight, and, of course what the 
Prince does " society," in the exclusive sense, will follow. In all 
probability, in the ensuing season the hour for dinner will be eight 
or half-past seven o'clock. 

The Princess of Wales has, it is said, become a very expert 
photographer, and has created a great amount of fun in the royal 
circle by taking members of the family in all sorts of curious cir- 
cumstances. While in Scotland she got some excellent portraits 
of the Queen in several positions, and also took about eighty nega- 
tives, in which royalties and other distinguished personages are 
shown wading on the coast. The German Emperor is also one of 
the busiest of amateur photographers. 



The Rev. W. W. Jackson, the leader of the party who wished 
to admit women to medical degrees at Oxford, is the Rector of 
Exeter College, and is, at the same time, one of the most brilliant 
talkers and one of the most nervous men in the University. Mr. 
Jackson is a recent convert to holy matrimony. He was con- 
verted by a widow. 

The leader of the victorious party, which wanted to exclude 
the ladies, is Mr. Thomas Case, the Professor of Logic. Mr. Case 
is famous for the excellence of the jokes which he cracks at the 
expense of those philosophers who differ from him on questions 
connected with metaphysics. He also jests successfully upon 
more mundane matters. 

The talk of Paris just now is the gallant act of a doctor who 
was called in to attend a very popular actress, whose face had 
been sadly damaged by a carriage accident. He came to the con- 
clusion that, to preserve her beauty, it was necessary to repair 
the lady's face with apiece of human skin, and, accordingly, he 
himself provided the remedy by removing a portion of his own. 
(Act the 5th, marriage?) 

Charles Dudley Warner, says the Washington Star, called one 
day upon his neighbor, Mark Twain, and asked him to go walk- 
ing. The humorist resisting, Warner advanced scriptural author- 
ity in support of his desire as follows: Matthew v: xli. "And 
whoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him, Twain." 
And Twain went. 



THE DELBECK CHAMPAGNES ! 



THE EXTRA 

THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE, 





The highest grade of Champagne without 
sweetness. 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(Established 1726, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oils. 




JAMES DE FREMERY &. CO., - San Francisco, 

General Agents, Pacific Coast. 

JJ-OJf^ SALEI 



THE PROPERTY 



California Iron and Steel Company, 

The Directors announce that all litigation has been settled, and they now 
offer for sale the following property, at 

EMERY STATION, OAKLAND, 

tuirty minutes' distance from San Francisco, adjoining the works of the 
Judson Manufacturing Company, running close to the railroad track of the 
Northern Railroad Company of California, a distance of about 400 feet, with 
the same frontage on the Bay, and containing about three acres of ground, 
together with all the machinery, etc., etc., consisting in part of five steam 
engines one thirty-ton steam hammer, four platform scales, concrete floor, 
75x150 and an elaborate catalogue of tools of all kinds. The engines and 
machinery have hardly been used, and the buildings, which are very large, 
are in fairly good order. 

This property is well worthy the attention of fouudrymen, and would be 
very suitable as a railroad repair and construction shop, also 

their Property in Placer and Nevada Counties, 

Consisting of about 8,200 acres of land within about seven miles of Auburn, 
nearly all of which is first-class farming and fruit land, and a large portion 
well covered with oak and pine timber; the mine, with its machinery, fur- 
nace dwellings, thirty large brick kilns for the burning of charcoal, and 
there is a large deposit of limestone and other minerals. The quality of the 
iron ore is well established, and the quantity is believed to be inexhaust- 
ible. Apply to 

F. BONACINA, Secretary, 438 California St. 



COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Fnelan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for ■ posi 
..vely extracting teethwithout pain. " Colton Gas " has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, jjfficacy^and perfect gaiety 



in all cases Thirty-five thousand relereuces. cstaonsneu icroa. xuuuiseu 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. DR CHAKLEg w DB0K BE. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



A BUNDLE OF EPIGRAMS. 

Ms Atqtje Aohdm. 
Golden are Phyllis' locks; alasl 
That Phyllis' face should be but, brass. 
Woman. 
All things, from apples upward, have a tendency to fall. 
But woman, ah! fair woman is most liable of all. 

On a Blue Veil. 
He — To veil your charms is kind, but why 
"With heaven's own tint the veil to dye 
Have they then striven? 
She— That men may view 
When parts the blue, 

A glimpse of heaven. 
On Chloe. 
«« Cold Chloe boasts a heart of stone; 
O why then claim her for your own? 
Friend, cease to wonder at my aim — 
The hardest flint conceals a flame." 

NOLESS VOLENS. 

" Tom's dead, and left behind his will — 

His legatees will thrive!" 
'•Tom's left, then, what Tom never had 

While Tom was yet alive. 
Forgive vs. Fobget. 
Good easy Jack owes much in bets — 

Too poor to ape his betters; 
May they forgive poor Jack his debts, 

As he forgets his debtors. 

Oxoniehsis. 



OUR AMERICAN BISMARCK. 



JUST after the Maine election, when Speaker Torn Reed was in 
all his glory, his friends delighted in dubbing him the "Amer- 
ican Bismarck." it was assumed to be a title of honor and dis- 
tinction and was made to pass around as such. Why the 
presiding officer of a deliberative assembly should be likened to 
the man of " blood and iron," we are not told. Nor are we in- 
formed why the supposed similarity in their methods should be 
selected as a cause for glorification by the American people. We 
can, however, imagine a class of persons to whom Bismarckian 
high-handedness in all the affairs of life, and in peace as well as 
in war, is a thing to be admired and imitated. But they are not 
the kind of people who gained American freedom in the past, or 
who may be trusted to maintain it in the future. Power is an 
excellent thing on the field of battle, but when might is used to 
silence debate, unseat duly elected members, and count in absent 
quorums, it is not right, and is subversive of freedom. To do him 
justice, we think Mr. Speaker Reed is of that opinion himself 
about this time. All the country between Maine and California 
has since been heard from, and nowhere between the two ex- 
tremes has he found admirers of American Bismarckianism. He 
admits that fully and has the good sense to make jokes at his 
own folly. And therein he differs wisely and well from Bismarck, 
who was not accustomed to take his defeats kindly. Fortunately 
for Speaker Reed he has lots of humor, and can invest a tragic 
political situation with a~"nalo of fun. He was explaining the 
prevalent Republican attitude the other day in this way: " We 
are like the man up in Maine. This man was charged with a 
good many offenses against the peace and morality of the neigh- 
borhood, and so his neighbors gave him a horse-whipping and 
ducked him in the horse-pond and tarred and feathered him. All 
this to make him a better man. After all was over and the man 
had cleaned the slime and tar and picked the feathers off, he 
showed up one day bright and smiling. 'There's nothing the 
matter with me,' he said, < I'm just as good a man as I ever was, 
and am all here safe and sound and feeling first-rate, though I 
must admit my moral tone has been lowered a little." Perhaps 
the merit of the story consists in the variety of applications it is 
susceptible of. The Speaker admits his chastisement, but vows 
that he is none the better for it, He is «he same old Tom Reed, 
he thinks. But about that he is obviously mistaken. That ma- 
jority in whose name he claimed to do all things has been taken 
away from him. He may have been a Bismarck, or even a Sam- 
son, but he has fallen and been shorn of his locks. 



The English Chancellor of the Exchequer lately attributed the 
falling off of the use of coffee to the introduction of a preparation of 
cocoa, known as " Grateful and Comforting." TJp to 1832 the duty on 
cocoa in England was Gd. per lb. Since it was reduced to 2d. the use 
of it was specially advocated by the homeopathic physicians. Then 
the first homeopathic chemists (Jas. Epps & Co.) produced a special 
preparation which needed only boiling water or milk to be, at once 
ready for use, and the superior character of this production has, no 
doubt, done much to bring about (backed by a further redaction to 
Id. per lb) the advance made. 

As a home remedy for throat and lung diseases, Ayer's Cherry 
Pectoral is invaluable. Druggists now have Ayer's Almanac. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

lilos, 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 

Cement. 

Sole Agents for " Bull Dog" brand 01 Bass' Ale and Guinness 

STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 

OENERAL AGENTS: 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 

ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 

BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON. 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the UBe of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

tOver 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

J" Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 
330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WILLIAMS. DIMOND & GO, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS, 

Agents for— 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

Company, I (L'd.), 

" The California Line of Clippers," The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

from New York, , Steel Rails and Track Material. 

"The Hawaiian Line of Packets," I 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth's Centri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 

327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

8AN FRANCISCO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY. 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

^J^r*' Manufacturers of Bluest-one, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 

The " Standard " Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 

Chamber/in Patents. 

J. W. GIRV1N & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST FOR 

American Rubber Co.'s Celebrated Rubber Boots and Shoes, 

HEAVY 

Gossamer, Mackintosh and Oil lothing, 

2 and 4 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Systems — "Slattery" Induction; "Wood" Arc. 
Factories — Fort Wayne, Ind., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELECTRIC IMPROVEMENT CO., 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and Washington, 
of the 

FORT WAYNE ELFCTRIC LIGHT COMPANY, 

Forr Wayne, Ind. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 

Plants, House Wiring, etc. 

MARINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

35 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET, 

San Francisco. 

JOHN H. DICKINSON, 

-A.ttora3.e3r and Counselor at Xja/w, 
No. 403 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Reference— Bank of California, San Francisco. 






BAN FR W< [SI NEWS LKTTKR. 






TURKEY HASH. 

AT Ibis time, mm the old-ctyle almanacs u«d to nay. look 
for an tpldtmlc ol turkey hash. Tin- f the 

Irim bird « ith the scraps «>f -tutting and the gob* of gravy, 
which e«rapetl the rortctoUJ appetite* «»f the dinner eaten, will 
make their appearance cunningly disguised as ragout- and Btawa 
and hashes: and let no one despise Iba day <«f small things, for in 
the OUfl V Ulrkej hub, as in many other thipgs, the part is 
better than the whole. How insensibly, at this time ol the year, 
one drifts into moralising. There seema to he something about 
the dying year which enforces reflection and retrospect, and for 

such a purpose turkey hast) Is as g i n text as any. It reminds 

us, among other things, that blessings brighten as they Lake their 
and there is with it. too, an optimistic thought, that some- 
times when we think we have exhausted our opportunities or 
our pleasures, there may be h rechaufft which shall bring back 
the past with even a more delicate flavor and renew the joys of 
the past with added zest. No process has yet been discovered 
for making old persons into young ones, the first experiment on 
record, that <>f Medea, having been so unsuccessful as to deter 
subsequent trials of the same method, and poor Ponce de Leon 
having searched for years in vain for tbe Fountain of Youth; 
hut while this material shell, which we call the body, must go 
the way of all flesh, there are possibilities in the way of renew- 
ing emotions and sensations, feeling as young as we used to be, 
and of luxuriating in the ardor of youth with the complimentary 
feature of the wisdom of age. We may, at least in imagination, 
warm over tbe scraps of our turkey and make a very tooth- 
some and palatable dish of them. Perhaps the best way to do 
this is to see ourselves reflected in our children. We can see in 
them our traits, not covered by the mask of conventionality and 
dissimulation which we are forced to wear and, though the coun- 
terfeit presentment may not always be flattering to us, at least 
enables us to get away from ourselves for a time and to be boys 
and girls again; to imagine that the world lies before us instead 
of around and about us, and to listen again with open ears to the 
flattering tale that hope will tell to all who will listen. 

A LARGE SUM WANTED. 



THE first of February next is to be a collection day in New 
York, the like of which has not been witnessed in recent 
times. On that day the importers have to pay to the Customs 
Department the large sum of $12,000,000, as duties on goods en- 
tered before the McKinley tariff became a law. Many of them 
were permitted to give bonds, payable on the first of February, 
and the falling due of these is now giving trouble, and creating 
alarm in the money market. It is a large sum to take all at once 
out of the active channels of trade. The penalty of not paying 
the bonds at the date fixed, is the payment of the higher duties 
provided by the new law. Meanwhile the goods remain 
in bond. Importers claim that the money cannot be paid, and 
have appealed to Congress to extend the time to the first of April; 
but it is said that Mr. McKinley and his friends are not very 
willing to grant tbe concession. They are credited with the be- 
lief that the importers deserve cinching for putting up prices on 
goods they were able to take out of bond before the new law be- 
came operative. Human nature is pretty uuch the same all over 
the world, and importers everywhere make a practice of specu- 
lating npon proposed increases of the tariff. At the same time, 
the New York men cannot reasonably complain if they are made 
to take the consequences of not'paying up. In order to get in as 
many cheap goods as possible, they traded beyond their means, 
and have no claim upon a Government whose policy they are 
evading. Yet that twelve millions have got to come from some- 
where, and meanwhile it is not to be wondered at that money is 
tight. 

A DESERVED COMPLIMENT. 

THE ladies and gentlemen of the Tipperary hunt paid Mr. Rich- 
ard Burke, the master of the hounds, a substantial compli- 
ment the other day, in the shape of a handsome gold cup. Mr. 
Burke is married to the daughter of the late James M. Donahue, 
one of the early pioneers, and spent last summer with his wife 
in California. Mrs. Burke, whose birthday it fortuitously hap- 
pened to be, was the recipient of a beautiful old Irish bow in 
silver. General Sir J. B. Gough, G. C. B., and the officers of the 
21st and 15th Hussars were among the guests at the luncheon 
that followed this interesting ceremony. 



THE cold weather is beginning to drive in the mining men to 
more comfortable quarters, and the corridors of the Palace seem 
for the time being to be fairly monopolized by the profession. 
Among the latest arrivals ia Professor Wilson, who has just 
dropped down from Washington Territory. 



MR. THOMAS FITCH, which we suppose is the prosaic way of 
addressing the "silver-tongued orator," has, it is said, just sub- 
scribed $99,800 towards the capital stock of the Montezuma 
Milling Company, lately organized with a capital of $100,000, at 
San Diego. 




*&* 



Citizen— So you think of locating hero? 
Physicion— Yea. I thought some of prac- 
ticing among you. 
Citizen — See here, young man. there's a 

good opening here for a man as understands 
Is biz, but we don't want no practicing, or 
experimenting— doctoring'.* what we want! 

Many times women call on their family 
physicians, suffering, as they imagine, one 
from dyspepsia, another from heart disease, 
another from liver or kidney disease, another 
from nervous exhaustion or prostration, 
another with pain here or there, and in this 
way they all present, alike to themselves and 
their easy-going and indifferent or ovcrbusy 
doctor, separate and distinct diseases, for 
which he prescribes his pills and potions, as- 
suming them to be such, when, in reality, they 
are all only symptoms caused by some womb 
disorder. The physician, ignorant of the cause 
of suffering, encourages his "practice" until 
large bills are made. The suffering patient 
gets no better, but probably worse by reason 
of the delay, wrong treatment and conse- 
quent complications. A proper medicine, like 
Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription directed to 
the cause would have entirely removed the 
disease, thereby dispelling all those distress- 
ing symptoms, and instituting comfort in- 
stead of prolonged misery. 

It's the only medicine for the weaknesses, 
irregularties and painful derangements pecu- 
liar to women, sold by druggists, under a 
positive guarantee that it will give satis- 
faction in every cane, or price ($1.00) paid for 
it will be promptly refunded. 



Dr. Pierce's Pellets jsp^ 

the liver, stomach and bowels. One a dose. 
Sold by druggists. 25 cents a vial. 



/ETNA MINERAL WATER COMPANY 

Invites Public Attention to the Justly Celebrated 

£TNA NATURAL MINERAL WATER, 

One of the Invaluable Resources of this Wonderful State, and chal 
lenges comparison of its demonstrated and acknowledged merits with 
those of any other Mineral Water, native or foreign. Citizens and 
families of San Francisco, who have used ^ETNA. since it was pnt on 
the market, pronounce Neither as a Beverage and Table "Water, or 
as a Preserver and Restorer of Health— Superior to any other known 
Mineral Water, Leading Physicians here and throughout the State 
recommend its daily use by both sick and well. 



/Etna Mineral Water Co. 

104, 106 and 108 Drumm St., S. F. 



TELEPHONE 536. 



LOUIS SLOSS & CO., 

AGENTS FOB THE 

IEC JL IR, LU lEC ! 
And other well-known Brands of Alaska Canned Salmon, 

310 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



PEARLS.— London World. 

Not very far to happy hasting feet 

The slender stretch of land between our lives, 
A distance so diminutive, so sweet 

When love is murmuring to the soul that strives, 
Of fullest rest, and peace Ibat naught shall mar — 

Not very far! 
And when my day is heavy, when the light 

Fades from the time, and life is dull and 
I think how little hides you from my sight, 

And quaff a cup of joy full to the brim, 
Thankful that I am living, since you are 
Not very far! 



dim, 



THE "REGULAR ARMY." 



THE Rev. Dr. Savage objects to the scheme of Gen. Booth, of the 
Salvation Army, for the relief of the destitute on the ground 
that " the regular Christian army is all equipped and ready for 
the fray." What fray? There appears to be some little difference 
of opinion concerning the object for which the regular Christian 
army is drawn up in line of battle. The first thing, of course, is 
to pay the salaries of the clergy. If there were a hitch in that 
quarter, the forces would forthwith disband. Next come the choir 
and the organist, and the handsome new church, with the Gothic 
steeple and the mortgage on top. If there is anything left after 
all these pressing needs have been provided for, the heathen in 
Uganda have the first call on it. All this is highly creditable, but 
where do the poor come in? It is the poor, Dr. Savage may be 
reminded, that Booth's scheme aims to help. The regular Chris- 
tian army is a magnificent thing. It has hundreds of thousands 
of officers, scores of millions of privates, and hundreds of millions 
of wealth. It is, indeed, fully " equipped for the fray " — the only 
trouble is, that it does not do any fighting. A single private citi- 
zen, like Stephen Girard, or George Beabody, or Leland Stanford, 
has accomplished more for the worldly welfare of the poor than Dr. 
Savage's army accomplishes in a whole year. Of course, we say 
nothing of spiritual welfare. The regular Christian army is, 
doubtless, a holy terror to the devil and all his angels. With Tal- 
ruage, Barrows and Sam Jones at the front, it could hardly be 
otherwise. But while a suitable preparation for the next world 
is important, there is a little sojourn in this to be bridged over. 
This period may be reasonably comfortable to people who can af- 
ford to hire pews in church and listen to operatic music from high- 
priced choirs, but it is rather hard on those who have to skirmish 
for something to eat. That is the explanation of the irregular 
movements for relief which so annoy Dr. Savage and other friends 
of the established order. 



MISS LENA DEVINE is a young San Franciscan, who left this 
city some five years ago, to continue the cultivation of 
her voice under tbe tuition of Italy's foremost master, Francesco 
Lamperti. She was warmly encouraged by him to devote herself 
to a public career, and of her singing at a concert in Milan, 
Sembrich, also a pupil of Lamperti's, declared Miss Devine's 
voice of unusual purity of tone and sweetness. These predictions 
are verified by ber successful singing in New York, and her many 
friends here will be pleased to learn that her industry and un- 
failing perseverance have placed her in the foremost rank of 
America's leading vocalists. 



MAYOR BOND, in bis veto of the resolution authorizing the 
purchase of Shag Rock as a Pest House, remarks that the 
sea, even in a moderate storm, dashes clear over the rock, and in 
a heavy gale would be likely to shatter or destroy the hopital. 
Bless His Honor's heart, so much the better if it did. A new one 
would then be built, and thus a fresh channel for the outpour of 
tbe city's money devised. Nobody is worrying about the suita- 
bility of the rock. The thing is to sell it first. We shall consider 
the question of suitability afterwards. 



A SPECIAL POLICEMAN— Cram by name— was heavily fined 
one day this week, in the Police # Court, for clubbing a visitor 
to a dive, because the fellow drank at the bar alone, and refused 
to treat the beautiful Hebes of the cellar. This, indeed, is carry- 
ing the administration of justice to a very severe point. It also 
displays an ignorance of the duties of the special officers who are 
employed in these places. They have the interests of their em- 
ployers at heart, and the visitor can take his choice of the source 
from which his swelled head shall proceed — gin or hickory. 



NOT A BED TICK— Lanes (waking up)— What's that noise, 
Brown? Sounds like a clock to me. 
Brown — Oh, turn over, you blamed fool; it's the ticking on the 
mattress. 



Underwear, hosiery, shirts, gloves and neckties of the very best, 
for gentlemen, constantly for sale by J. W. Carmany, 25 Kearny 
street. 

Elegant Mercurial Barometers for Hotels, Offices, Libraries, Club Rooms, 
etc., at Muller's Optical Depot, 135 Montgomery Street. 




|K(© 



This is a representation of an equestrian trying to overtake a car- 
riage, and, by the use of J. P. Cutter whisky, 'is enabled to show his 
agility by standing erect in the stirrups, thereby relieving the horse 
of his weight and enabling the animal to catch the vehicle. E. Mar- 
tin & Co., sole agents, Front street, San Francisco. 

• Bricks boiled in coal-tar are rendered hard and durable, and 

ruachine-niade bricks, if boiled for a long period — say twenty-four 
hours— become waterproof. Bricks thus treated are well-adapted 
for sewers, cesspools and the foundations of buildings. 



Teacher— What is the plural of mani 

what is the plural of baby?" " Twins." 



Blinks— Been traveling in Europe, eh ? 
tels? Jinks — Hired a cab. 



Smart Boy — Men. " And 
— Washington Post. 

How did you find the ho 
— Good News. 



FOR THE NEW YEAR. 



HATS! 



Begin the new year under a new hat. Remember we are right 
in the midst of the greatest bargain sale ever inaugurated in this 
city. We have to-day $60,000 worth of hats that we wish to 
reduce to the lowest notch before we incorporate. To-day we will 
sell black stiff fur hats for dJQ Crt that have found a ready 
sale for $3 50, and are U> £- O U 
United States for less than $3. 



sold nowhere else in the 



GRAND SPECIAL SALE TO-DAY. 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 

Clothiers and Outfitters, 

924, 926, 928 and 930 Market Street, Through to Ellis. 

2,000,000 ACRES ! 

Vast Estates or Acre Lots. All Specialties in Land. 



Stock, Dairy, Grain, Fruit aud General Farms, Resorts, Timber Land 
Mexican Land, Mines, Town Sites aud Lots, City Mansions, Couatry Villas 
and Sites, Investment and Speculative Properties. Money to Loan. 
Send ten cents for 110 page Catalogue. 

C, H. STREET A CO., Land Asents, 
415 Montgomery Street. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 



SAN FK W< [S( O NKWS I KTTER. 



SAN FRANCISCO AMD NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY, 

"THE DONAHUE 8R0»D0*UGE ROUTE." 

ooNiracnfe botidat, November ie. uko, 

aud antll further notice. h«U aii'l 1 rain, will 
leare from and arrive al the S*u Frmuriico l"a» 
HWl Depot. MARKET STKEKT W11ARK. a> 

fOllflWI 

Fro*" San Francisco lor Polnl Tiburon and San Rafael. 
WEEK DATB-t « a. ».. 9:'J0 a. *.. 11 J) a. M.: 

a jo r. ».. 5 c» r. ■., 6 ao r. a. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 1 40 PH. 
ai'Nl"AY»-»<B a »..9J0a.».. u.iiOA.a.;2.(Ur.M. 

S*)r * . fi li r. a. 

Front San Ralael lor San Francisco. 
WEEK l>AY3-».20 a. a.. 7.S6 a. a., 930 a a. 

U ■ r x .3 • r a .5:05 r*. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— Ad extra trip at 6:30 r.a. 
SUNDAYS— 6 lo A.a..9:«0 a. a., 1215 p. a.: 3:40 p.m. 

5:00 P. M..6 25 P. a. 

From Point Tiburon lor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS 6:50 A.a., 830 A.a.. 9:55 A.a.; 1:10 

p. a.. 4:05 p. a.. 5:80 p. a. 

Saturdays ouly au extra trip at 6:55 p a 
SfS D AYS— 8:34 a.a.. 10.05 A.M., 12:40 p. a.; 

40fT a.. 5:30r.M.. 6:50P. a 



LiatiS.F 


Arrive in 3. F. 


«■__> DMTINATION. 
5." 3und ^»| 


Sundays, £«* 


7:40a.m. 5:00 a. k. 1 Petaluma 
3:30 p.m. $ 30 a. m. and 
5:00 p.m. 5:00p. m. Santa Rosa. 


10:40 A.a 
6:05 p.M 
7:25 P. a 


8:50a. a. 
10:30 A.a 
6:05 p.m. 



7:40a.m. 
3:30p.M. 



j Fulton j 

Windsor, 

... j He&ldsburg, 
8:00a.m. littrto Sprinrs. 7:25p.m. 

Cloverdale & 

] Way Stations, j 



10:30a. M 
6:05 p.M 



7:40a. M. 8:00a. m. 



Hopland 
and Ukiah. 



':2op. m.6:05p.M. 



7:40a. a 
3:30 p.a 


8:O0a. a. 


Guerneville. 


7:25p.M. 


10:30a. h 
6:05p.m. 


7:40 A. a 
5:00 p. a. 


18:00 a. a. 
5:00p. a 


Sonoma and 110:40a.m 
Glen Ellen. 1 6:05p.m. 


■ 8:50a.m. 
(6:05P.M. 


7:40 A.a 
3:30p.a 


8:C0A.a 
5:00 p M 


Sebastopoll 1 ":^* 


10:30 AH 

6 :05 PJI 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Stages Springs, at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
Willits, Canto, Capella, Potter Valley, Sherwood 
Valley, and Mendocino City, Hydesville, Eureka, 
Booneville aod Greenwood. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, $2 25; to 
Healdsbnrg, $3 40; to Litton Springs, $3.60; to Clo- 
verdale, $4-50; to Hopland, $5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75; 
to Guerneville, $3.75; to Sonoma, $1.50; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healde- 
burg, $2.25; to Litton Springs, $2.40; to Cloverdale, 
$3; to Ukiah, $4, 5 °; to Hopland, $3.S0 to Sebasto- 
pol, $1.80; to Guerneville, $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; 
to Glen Ellen, $1.20. 

H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLTNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New onlgo mery Street. 



THE VILLAGE CHOIK / 

Ball * bar, half a bar. 
Half a bar onward! 
Into an awful ditch, 
Choir and prfjevntor hltohi 
into a man of pltobi 

They M the Old Hundr.d. 
Trebles to right of them. 
Tenon t«> left of them, 

Basse:) in front of them. 

Bellowed and thundered. 
Oh. that precentor's look, 
When the sopranos, took 

Their own time and hook 
From the Old Hundred. 

Screeched all the trebles here, 
Boggled the tenors there. 
Raising the parson's hair. 

While his mind wandered ; 
Theirs not to reason why 
This psalm was pitched too high ; 
Theirs but to gasp and cry 
Out the Old Hundred. 

Trebles to right of them, 
Tenors to left of them, 
Basses in front of them, 

Bellowed and thundered. 
Stormed they with shout and yell, 
Not wise they rang nor well, 
Drowning the sexton's bell, 

While all the church wondered. 

Dire the precentor's glare, 
Flashed his pitchfork in air, 
Sounding the fresh keys to beat 

Out the Old Hundred. 
Swiftly he turned his back, 
Reached he his bat from rack, 
Then from the screaming pack 
Himself he sundered. 
Tenors to right of him, 
Trebles to left of him, 
Discords behind him 

Bellowed and thundered. 
Oh, the wild howls they wrought; 
Right to the end they fought! 
Some tune they sang, but not, 
Not the Old Hundred. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 

For New York via Panama, 

8. 8. "Acapulco " Saturday, Jan. 3, 1891, 

at 12 O'CLOCK NOON, 

Taking freight and passengers direct for— 
MAZATLAN, 
ACAPULCO, 
OCOS, 

CHAMPERICO, 
SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, 
ACAJUTLA, 
LA LIBERTAD, 
CORINTO, 
PUNTA ARENAS, 
— AND — 
PANAMA, 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

8. 8. City op Peking, . . . Saturday, Jan. 10th, 1891, 

at 3 o'clock p. M. 
8. 8. City of Rio de Janeiro, Tuesday, Feb 3, 1891, 

at 3 o'clock p. M., 
8. 8. China, Thursday, Feb. 26th, 

at 3 o'clock p. M. 

Round-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 

reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First aDd Brannan streets. 
Branch Office, 202 Front street. 

W. R. A. JOHNSON, 

Acting General Agent. 
George H. Rice, Traffic Manager. 
N. B.— Note change in hour of sailing of China 
Line Steamers. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of thiB Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B. C, and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. h. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m., connect at Port Townsend with steamers 

Fob PORTLAND, Oregon, In connection with 
U. P. R'y Co., every four days. 

Fob SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cavucos, Post Harford, San Lois Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Babbaba, San Bdenaven- 

TUEA, HOENEME, SAN PeDBO, LOS ANGELES AND 

8an Diego, about every second day. 

Fob EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer CORONA, every Wednesday, 
at 9 A. M. 

Foe POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 p. M. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Marke t street, San Francisco . 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, 
For Honolulu Only, 
8. 8. AUSTRALIA (3,000 tons), Jan. 2, 1891, at 2 p. M. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 
Mabiposa Monday, January 1?, 1891, at 3 p. m. 

Or immediately on arrival of the British mail. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. ^^ p SPRECKELS & BROS., 
General Agents. 

Mil 25 NEW STYLE FRINGE EMBOSSED, FLORAL, 
• [, m UN HIDDEN NAME, Ao. CARDS, 500 SCRAP PICTURES. 

*a "o J5 1WU', Ladi.V A« R. ., :.W, 1 Tal, t.I.v, .V .ENTS' OUTFIT, 
^bUX X 10 ccou. GLOBE CARD CO., CENTEUBROOK,, lOMf. 



NAME 

Verses, Ac, I 



PLAYS 



logue free. T. S. DBmaoN,ohluagu,iu. 



27 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 
PACIFIC BT8I KM. 

Trotna l.«nv« mr.fi «ro Duo to Arrive at 

SAN KHANCISCO: 

lute | From Dumber 15, 1890 I arrive 

. I ■ ! 



7:30*. ilaTwanln. Nlles&iid San 

lacnun'toA Redding, vl* D 
7:30a. Second Class tor 0« a 00 an 

and flr-t cI*ju locally 

•:00a. Martlno«,Valtoto and Caltstoga 
•- 00 \. hi Vtranoand danls Rosa 
Nllaa, Ban Jo 

tramontO) uarysvtlle, Oro- 
villa and Red Bluff 
9:00a. I.--- tVngalas Express, I 

BakiT-fU-M, MnjrtveatHl Bast, 

8au(n Ittirlxirti A' Log Angelas. 

1200m. Haytrarda, NUes and Llvermorc 

•t:00p. Bacrameato River Steamers 

3:00 p. Haywarda. Nlles and Baa Jose 

■i.OOr. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

Doming, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 

4-.00P. Martlnos Vallejo, and Calistoga 
4:00 p. El Verauo and Santa Rosa .... 

4:00r. Latlirop and Stockton 

4:30 p. Sacramento and Knight's Land- 
ing via Davis. 

*4:30p. Nlles aud Livermore.. 

*4:30p. Niles and San Jose 

. . Nilca aud San Jose 

6:00 P. Haywards, Niles and Sun Jose. 
7:00 p. Central Atlantic Express, Ogdeu 

and East 

J7 p. Vallejo 

y;UU p. ShastaRoute Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
laud, Puget Souud aud East. 



fi:lfi p. 
6.15F. 



10:16a. 

7 16 P, 
•fi:00A. 
0:46 a. 



8:46 P. 
9:46A. 
*9.46 \. 
10:15 a. 

10:15 A, 
•8:46 A, 

•7:4. t p. 
Jti:15P. 
7:45 A. 

12:15 F. 
+8:45 P. 



Santa Cruz Division. 



8:16a. Newark, CentervilW, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 5:60 p. 

*2:15p. Ceuterville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz *11:20a. 

4:15 p. Ceuterville, San Jose aud Los 

Gatos 9:50A. 

+11:45 p. "Hunters' aud Theatre" Train to 

Newark, San Jose & Los Gatos. . . J$.05p. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets). 

8:30a. San Jose, Almaden, Gilroy, Tres 
Pinos.Pajaro.SantaCruz, Mon- 
terey, Pacific Grove, Salinas, 
Soledad, San Miguel, Paso Ro- 
bles and Santa Margarita (San 
Luis Obispo) aud principal 

Way Stations 6:30 p. 

10:30a. San Jose, and Way Stations.. 3 OOp. 

11:20 a. Cemetery and San Mateo 1:39 p. 

12:30 P. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 5:05 p. 

*3 :30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 

aud principal Way Stations. *10:05 a. 

*4:20p. Menlo Park aud Way Stations. . . *7:56a. 

5:20 p. San Jose and Way Stations 9:03 a, 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6:35 a. 
fll:45p. Menlo Park aud principal Way 

Stations +7:30 p. 



a. for Morning. 
*Sundays excepted. 
**Mondays excepted. 



p. for Afternoon. 
+Saturdays only. 
ISundays only. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Note change in hour of sailing. 
Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. m. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 18S0. 

Belgic Tuesday, December 30. 

Steamer 1891 

Oceanic Thursday, January 22. 

Gaelic Saturday, February 14. 

Belgic Tuesday, March 10. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition aud Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Fraucisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen . Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Santa I'e Koute. 

Trains Leave aud Arrive at San Francisco 

(Market Street Ferryj. 

Leave Daily. From June 15, 18D0. I ArriveDaily. 



9:00 A. M. 
4:00 P. M. 



Fast Express via Hojnve. 
Allan' ic Ex|irB>s via L-s 
Angles. 



8:45 p. M. 
10:15 A. 



M. 



Ticket Office— 650 Market st., Chronicle Building, 
San Francisco. W. A. BISSELL, 

General.Passenger Agent 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 3, 1891. 




ACCORDING to latest cable reports the conference that has 
taken place in France between Mr. Parnell and Mr. O'Brien, 
is likely to result in the former's retirement from the Irish leader- 
ship. If Mr. Parnell had been a wise man after his undefended 
escapade with the woman in his case, be would have quietly re- 
tired from the front, but relying on his power over his followers 
he thought he could fight for and retain his leadership and therein 
he committed an error. The Kilkenny verdict in the election of 
Sir J. Pope Hennessey against Mr. Parnell's candidate, Mr. Scully, 
should have been sufficient to convince him that the country was 
against him. He still, however, holds public attention as the 
most prominent actor on the stage of English politics. Columns 
upon columns of the papers are taken up with dramatic incidents 
of the struggle which this remarkable man has been carrying on 
almost unaided with Mr. Gladstone and the entire Liberal Party, 
with a strong section of his former allies, with the Irish hierarchy 
and in defiance of British sentiment. It was in deference to Eng- 
lish moral sentiment that Gladstone suggested Parnell's with- 
drawal, and it is evident that to oppose that sentiment he deter- 
mined to remain. The sure forces of public opinion are against 
him and what he should have seen at first he will be compelled 
to realize at last. As a man of keen intellect, he should have 
seen that his usefulness as a leader had been destroyed by his own 
act and then if he had a part of the patriotism he has professed, 
his duty of immediate retirement was plain. Mrs. O'Shea is said 
to be using her influence to draw Mr. Parnell back to seclusion. 

Whether the protest against Russia's persecution of the Jews, 
adopted at a late meeting at the Guildhall, in London, and which, 
the cable informs us, has just been dispatched to St. Petersburg 
by the Lord Mayor, will have the desired effect, is rather doubt- 
ful. The Russian press resent the action of the meeting in Lon- 
don, expressing sympathy with the Jews. At the bottom of the 
movement, they aver, is the fear of the English of an invasion of 
their country by the Jews, who might deprive the poor of their 
bread and enter into competition with the rich. This averment 
is based upon what is said to be the course of the English Govern- 
ment and of the Jewish organizations in London. The former 
has instructed its Consuls to discourage the coming of the refugees 
to England, and the latter, to pacify the British public, and par- 
ticularly the London working people, announce that they will be 
sent as fast as they arrive to America! Meanwhile, the Russians 
declare that the measures they are taking aTe not political or re- 
ligious, but are on account of the practice so long alleged and 
complained of. usurous extortion by the Jewish money-lenders. 
The Novoe \ r remya, on this point, asserts that the new laws are 
necessary to save the peasants froui ruin, and adds that " if the 
whole of Europe should attempt to force a distasteful policy upon 
Russia, she is in a position to successfully defend her inde- 
pendence." 

All accounts go to show that Socialism is throwing aside the 
bristles that rendered contact with it impossible and gradually 
assuming a place as a political power — weighty in proportion as 
its votes are numerous. This is particularly the case in Ger- 
many, where it has learnt many lessons and is now dropping its 
tone of menace. In Germany one voter in ten is a Socialist, if 
statistics are to be relied on, and the cry is organize! organize 1 
The spread of Socialism leads one to wonder whether Democracy 
does not labor under a peculiar disadvantage, which has not yet 
been sufficiently noticed. As compared with a personal despot- 
ism, the superiority does not seem entirely to lie with the Demo- 
cratic despotism. The impersonality of tyranny under the latter is 
apt to render re-action less prompt and effective. When personal 
liberty is aggressed upon by decrees, there seems to be a greater 
tendency to resistance than when the aggression is committed 
by laws. The animosity of the victims does not seem to be so 
effectually aroused by a Legislature # or by a majority as by a 
personal despot. There is, of course, no more reason for sub- 
mission in the one case than the other, the only reason in either 
case being the inability to resist. The Socialism of Germany 
is in resistance to despotic authority, and that of the freer 
countries is more to resist those temporary and accidental ma- 
jorities that are sometimes engaged in riding rough-shod over their 
personal initiative and personal liberty. 

In spite of the Russian press, which is always pointing to 
England as the bitterest enemy of the Empire, the two countries 
seem determined to remain on friendly terms with each other. 
Quite recently an English engineer was invited to an appointment 
in connection with some important railway undertakings in 
Russia; and now the son of the Czar is about to visit India as 
the guest of the Viceroy of the East Indies. There is no doubt 
that the maintenance of these friendly relations is a very wise 
policy. A celebrated English statesman has predicted that with- 
in the next century all the Western nationalities will have 



merged into thfcee great Powers— England, Russia and the 
United States. "Therefore," says the London Court Joxirnal, 
commenting on this, » we may as well keep on good terms with 
a country that is going to have such a large share in the future 
control of the world." 

Occasionally the comical crops out in some of the orders of the 
European governments, and here is something of the kind in a 
recent ordinance of the Italian Minister of War on the subject of 
the length of the officers jackets. The document points out the 
desirability of uniformity in uniforms, and states that it has been 
found that officers of the same category have jackets of various 
lengths, showing more or less area of trowsers. This is declared 
to be subversive of discipline, and for the future these are to 
be the regulations in force: " Cavalry officers are to wear jackets 
which do not cover the seat of the trowsers. In the case of artil- 
lery officers the jacket is to be of such length as to half cover the 
seat of the trowsers; and in the case of infantry officers, to wholly 
cover it." Therefore in order to discover to what category an 
officer belongs it will be necessary to take a back view of hini. 



LILY POST the erstwhile favorite prima donna of comic opera 
in San Francisco, will retire from the stage temporarily on ac- 
count of ill health. Frank Blair, formerly Mr. Lily Post, has not 
retired, (his many old-time San Francisco "chummies" will re- 
member that he was not of a retiring nature), but is to " star " in 
The Balloon. In effect, if Frank fails at all, he will be "gone 
up " in a Balloon. 



A WOMAN was nearly killed the other day, while trying to 
make jelly of electrical currents. 

Mrs. Cool, dentist. Room 10. Chronicle Building— All branches of 
dentistry practiced; cleaning, polishing and beautifying the teeth a 
specialty. 

Yes, I'll be there, to see the match, so book a good position. The reason I 
caii do so is— well. M tiller the Optitiaii. 13- r > Montgomery street, near Bush. 



Sanborn, Vail & Co., 



SAN FRANCISCO, 

Portland, and Lios Angeles. 





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Oil Colors in Tubes, Water Colors 
in Cakes, Moist Colors in Tubes and 
Pans; Water Color Liquids, Mediums, 
Oils and Varnishes in Bottles. 

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vas, Academy Boards, Sketching Papers. Uold Paint, 
Materials for Clifna Painting, Pallettes. Easels, 
Studies, Hand Boobs on tlte Fine Arts. All oilier 
Articles used by Amateurs and Artists. 

Wholesale and Retail, 857-859-861 Market St., S. F. 

MME. B. ZISKA, A. M., 

(Receutly Principal of Zeitska Institute) 

160G California Street, 

continues to receive a limited number of pupils, who wish to receive pri- 
vate instruction under her special direction. Four young ladies admitted 
as resident students. French, German, English and all the branches of a 
complete education. 

IATTHIAS GEAY CO, 

206 Post Street. 
General Agents for the Celebrated 

STEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS ! 

(the best in the wokld>. 
Ernest Gabler Pianos, 

Kranich & Bach Pianos, 
C. Roenisch Pianos, 
C. P. Pease & Co.'s Pianos. 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 



Ladies and gentlemen desiring to 
send to their friends East the 

TABLE WINES 

OF THE 
INGLENOOK VINEYARD, 
Can have their orders filled at San 
Francisco prices and of freight at 
car-load rates added, thus saving a 
great expense by leaving their or- 
ders in time with 

F. A. HABER, 
Sole Agent of the Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S.F. 




' 



ETT1 * 




<fnltforiii;i Adbcrtiscv. 



OrvOTIO TO TNI LCAOIHO INTgRESTS O' Cau'OONIA AND TNC PACIFIC OOAST. , 

PtinUd ami 

MaHRIoTT / Vrtri- 

ri»co. Annual >*■ <MaQf, Vnittii Statt 

Oamadn. $4; 8 swall . v' I months. Jl .,$'>; 

6 monlV*. |8; 3 months. |1 



Si«/V FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1891. 



THE SIEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

SlTrOSE a man has made a fortune in Arizona or Nevada or* 
anywhere you please and removes with his family to this 
t'ity. how U be t" get within that mystic circle which is called 
society? How shall he go to work t<> storm the ramparts whirl! en- 
compass our local Four Hundred, and gain admission to the inner 
and most sacred shrine of the social temple? Probably he and 
his family may be lacking in the arts and graces which play 
so important a part in society ; his grammar may not be above 
suspicion, his wife may not know how to wear a reception dress 
properly, the daughters of the family may be blessed rather with 
robust health than with that apparent fragility which city belles 
affect, and bis sons may never have studied the art of incarna- 
dining the town after the most approved methods. The question 
is really a serious one, and one which it is the duty of such a 
well-regulated family journal as this to answer for him if pos- 
sible. In the first place the worthy man must cultivate assidously 
the art of forgelfulness. Not only must the waters of Lethe roll 
on his past struggles and experiences, but he must learn to ignore 
his former friends and associates and to pass them on the street 
without recognition. For this purpose shorl-iightedness, whether 
real or assumed, is very effective. Should he be compelled to 
speak of his former acquaintances, he must neverretnember any- 
body below therank of a Congressman or a Lieutenant-Governor. 
Bill and Bob and Jack were all well enough in Arizona, but this 
is a very different sphere. That the old man must spend and 
lend bis money freely goes without saying, and he will find 
plenty to show him where he can put it to the best advantage; 
not his advantage, possibly, but that of his advisers. His good 
wife mutt begin her labors at home. She must capture a few 
of the gilded youth of this city and feed them well, giving them 
boundless libations of "fizz" wherewith to wash down their 
viands, and complacently closing her eyes if they happen to get 
tipsy and make fools or beasts of themselves. She must sub- 
scribe liberally to church fairs and kindergartens and charities 
of all sorts, being careful to see not only that her right hand 
does not know what her left hand does, but that the daily press 
know it as well. The girls must select one of two roles. They 
must go in either for the esthetics or athletics. If there are two 
daughters it will be well for one to take up one, and the other the 
other. They must, of course, become first-nighters at opera and 
theater, wear elegant clothes and not too much jewelry, and get 
their names coupled, in all innocence, with those of some young 
men about town who are believed to be anxious to marry if the 
dowry of the prospective brides be sufficient. A foreign noble- 
man, real or fictitious, is a great makeweight at this state of the 
siege. As for the boys they must be elected to two or three clubs, 
play a little poker with a modest limit, take in the town with 
chosen spirits, own a good horse or two, and, generally speaking, 
be good all-round fellows. We would not advise the affectation 
of freedom too early in the action, as it is somewhat out of date. 
The blase air can come later if it be found needful. If it can be 
generally understood that the young men have a fortune in their 
own right, it will be no detriment to them. It may occur to the 
casual reader that the key to the whole matter is money — and so 
it iB. To have money and spend it is the one secret of admission 
to society in San Francisco. Having the one thing needful, 
every thing else shall be added to you. Your gaucheries shall be 
classed as eccentricities, and your stupidity as an idiosyncrasy. 
If your sons get " bilin' full " and bring up in the police station, 
it shall be charitably charged to the high spirits of youth. If 
your daughters lie in bed all day and read novels, or decline to 
make themselves useful or agreeable, it shall be set down to the 
delicacy of their constitutions. Money is the mystic word, the 
» Open Sesame," before which thegates of society fly wide open, 
and at whose sound obsequious toadies and flunkies prostrate 
themselves. The siege becomes a triumphal entry, and the citadel 
surrenders at the first challenge, provided the blast of the be- 
siegers be blown upon a golden horn. 



STANFORD AS AN INDEPENDENT. 

S-.i has broken with hit part] and taken 
other Senator-, with him. all of whom arc Western OICO Wbo 

are likely to It Joined by other*. There t* no escaping the »ignl- 

n taken In laying aatd* th« Federal i 
Hill. It was a party measure, earnestly approved by tin Presi- 
dent, passed by tbs majority party In ths Boom and adopted 
locus of Republican Senator?. It- pasi lleved 

to be necessary to the future existence "f tbs party In power. 
Besides being a matter of policy, It was hsld to be ona ■<( prin- 
ciple. Its advocates claimed that without it rreeand fair eleo< 
tlons were imp. .-sible. and tUat it VII an Injustice to give any 
<l.i" "f people tbe ballot and not protect them in voting it as 
they pleased. We are not arguing for that view: on the con- 
trary we know there was a great deal that wan forcible and true 
to be said on the other side. Hut the fart remains that the Bill 
was deemed one by whirh strict party fealty wan to be gauged. 
The ruling party bad suspended all other business in the Senate 
and was witling to occupy the whole session in passing this one 
measure. To bolt the caucus decision and lay the Hilt aside is in 
violent antagonism to all party usage, ff only one Senator, 
whose support could be dispensed with, had indulged in any 
such course he would almost certainly have been promptly read 
out of the party. But when a combination is formed that re- 
presents a large and growing section of the country and that is 
strong enough to at once hold the balance of power, the fact be- 
comes apparent that party relations are not what they were, and 
that a body of Independents has arisen that is likely to give a 
new trend and a new interest to politics. 

That giving the right-of-way to one bill in preference to an- 
other was intended to mean a party defeat is clear from what has 
occurred. The killing of the Force Bill was what the bolters un- 
disguisedly intended. It was not alone that they wished to take 
up the Silver Bill, but that they thought the other measure ob- 
noxious and well out of tbe way for all time. Senator Stewart's 
speech unmistakably pointed in that direction. But, as if to clear 
up any doubts that might remain on that point, Senator Stanford 
has taken care there should be no misunderstanding of his po- 
sition. His views were telegraphed to this Coast, and, no doubt, 
by his procurement. The dispatch bears evidence on its face of 
having been maturely considered and carefully written. It is the 
studied production of a man conscious of a new and important 
departure. In it the Senator avows that it was his intention to 
vote against the Force Bill, and that he had voted to lay it aside 
because: " It never could have been enforced. It would tend to 
consolidate the whites of tbe South and bring misery upon the 
blacks. It would increase the hatred of the former for the latter, 
and kindle anew the discords of the past." Those are clean-cut 
and sharply denned words, that leave no possible misunderstand- 
ing of the fact that California's senior Senator is no longer in ac- 
cord with either the action or policy of his party. He voted to 
kill its pet measure. With the assistance of tbe United Demo- 
crats, he caused a bill to be taken up, providing for the free coin- 
age of silver, which the President says he will veto if passed. In 
evident anticipation of that veto, our Senator says, " if the bill 
does not become law now, it must be made the leading issue in 
tbe coming Presidential campaign." All that is plain enough. It 
means that henceforth Senator Stanford, and those wbo think 
with him, are more Independent than Republican. 

It is an incident worthy of note 'hat the Senator's clear ex- 
pression of views and intentions was telegraphed to this Coast 
before the caucus at Sacramento could be called upon to vote on 
the question of his re-election. It is plain that he intended it to 
be understood that he must be chosen as an Independent, or not 
at all. In the face of what he has chosen to do and say, it would 
be idle to claim him as strict a party man. We think the people of 
California, and of the whole Coast, will be glad to know that he 
is not. Leland Stanford is too big a man in every way to be the 
mere tool and creature of party. All Californians, without dis- 
tinction of creed or politics, delight to claim him as the repre- 
sentative man of the State. It would belittle the philanthropic 
founder of a UNIVERSITY for all to end his days wearing the 
badge of servility that attaches to the party politician of the 
period. The News Letter held and expressed that view long 
ago, and is glad to see that the course of events is tending towards 
a realization of its wishes. The admission of the new States has 
increased the political power of the Coast, and made independent 
political action possible and profitable. Our section is strong 
enough now'to make itself felt, and it has everything to gain and 
nothing to lose by doing so. As a close State, California did fairly 
well; as tbe leader of an independent section she will do better. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Leading Articles : Page 

Stanford as an Independent ... 1 
The Siege of riau Francisco — 1 

Ho ' for the South Pole 2 

Booth's Clerical Critics 2 

Wanted— A Republican-Policy. 2 
The Behriug's Sea Difficulty - - . 3 
Cieating at the Custom House . 3 
American Industries and Eng- 
lish Cdpita.1 3 

The Sioux Comedy 3 

Society 4 

Worthy Charities 5 

Pleasure's Wand 6 

What They Missed 7 

Sparks 8 

The Railroads 9 

Sporting 10 

Snots From the Mitrailleuse 11 

A Lor Maire Show 12 



Page 

Vanities - - 13 

Financial Review 14 

Town Crier . IS 

" Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 1(5 

The Rose Jar 17 

Real Property . . ... 18 

The Bourse and Underwriter. .. 19 

Scientific aud Useful. 20 

Sunbeams 21 

Living Up to His Hat 22 

Gotham G-ossip 23 

World, Flesh and Devil 24 

The Solid Nine and the Uncer- 
tain Twelve 25 

Swell Apartments 26 

The New Pound Keeper 26 

A Toast (Poetry) 27 

Obituary 28 

Comments on Foreign Affairs ... 28 



HO! FOR THE SOUTH POLE. 

THE world is going ahead. There is no doubt about that. As 
the old saying is, when one door shuts another opens. Now 
that the seal fisheries on the Alaskan Coast are becoming de- 
pleted because of the criminal incompetency of the English and 
American governments to look after the same, another avenue 
opens, another seal ground has been found and the luxurious 
ladies of the present world may not long have to envy their 
luckier sisters of the erstwhile sealskin. There can be little 
doubt that the seal fisheries of the Arctic are doomed. Whatever 
may be the real rights of the Behring sea controversy, one thing 
is certain — an adjustment of the difficulty, as between American 
claims, English claims and general freebooters' claims, is not like- 
ly to be arrived at before the pudding which all hands are fight- 
ing for, and which is growing small by degrees and beautifully 
less, will eventually disappear and, like the baseless fabric of a 
vision, leave not a rack behind. Possibly the question involved 
will not begin to be thoroughly and adequately appreciated till 
our sisters, our cousins and our aunts, and the female sex gener- 
ally, put in a shivering appearance before their male adorers, rise 
in their wrath and demand the why and the wherefore of their 
woe-begone condition. This is truly a sorry aspect of affairs, and 
it is one, which every man of sense and policy would like to 
bring rose-colored spectacles to bear upon, if he only knew how. 
While British Columbians, and Canadians from the other side, 
and \ankee skippers are doing their best to kill the goose that 
laid the golden egg by the indiscriminate slaughter of young and 
breeding seals in Alaskan waters, and it seems as if nothing could 
be done to protect the general interest from the avarice of the in- 
dividual, there springs a ray of hope out of the darkness, and it 
springs, strange to say, from that as yet unknown quantity in 
geographical and piscatorial terms — the South Pole. People are 
accustomed to associate the Antarctic regions with all the bleak 
and inhospitable qualities of the unknown. This is true — but 
then it is only yesterday that Central Africa was penetrated, and 
if the truth were told the entire world is just beginning to emerge 
from political, social and financial barbarism and to take a fresh 
start on its own merits. Therefore, why not the South Pole? It 
is now receiving impetus from the destruction of all that made its 
sister pole valuable. It is said that there are as large and import- 
ant seal rookeries in the neighborhood of Kerguelen's Land as any 
around Behring Sea, and that they only need to be exploited to 
have their value appreciated and known. All that is now known 
of the regions around the South Pole is that, some fifty years ago, 
the British government vessels, Erebus and Terror, did their best 
to circumnavigate and arrive at such details as they could regard- 
ing a lofty line of ice, stretching for thousands of miles and im- 
peding passage, somewhere about twenty degrees of latitude from 
the Pole itself. A few charts about this expedition were pub- 
lished, but the facts were so shadowy and unreliable that none 
but a few of the more progressive or visionary geographers cared 
to define these regions in their maps. * Now, however, things 
are assuming quite another shape. The sealskin question is likely 
to bring the matter up, and it may not be very long before we have 
South Pole for breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper. Our Austra- 
lian cousins have "caught on," as the saying is, as a pure matter 
of business. There is no question as to the existence of immense 
and valuable seal and whale fisheries within Australian reach, and 
the Antarctic waters are as near to Australia as Baffin's Bay is to 
England. Baron Nordenskjold and Baron Dickson — names that 
have been for years associated with Arctic enterprise, and are a 
tower of strength and a sign of success in themselves — are said 
to be willing to organize and equip an Antarctic expedition, pro- 
vided the Australian colonies will guarantee to stand by them to 
a certain extent— ?25,000 we believe is the sum named* So that, 
after all, the ruthless rapacity and greed of man in the north may 
have the effect of opening up a new domain for enterprise in the 
opposite hemisphere. 



BOOTH'S CLERICAL CRITICS. 
| 

WE are just beginning to wake up to the fact in San Francisco 
that General Booth's army is not made up altogether of the 
ragged regiment we are accustomed to see parade our streets. We 
may not quite like the ways of the Salvation Army, and they cer- 
tainly do not seem suited to an educated, well-to-do community, 
that has more churches and pastors than it fully appreciates. It 
should be remembered, however, that the army was organized 
for a very different place and people. It may be out of its natural 
sphere in San Francisco, but its usefulness in the East end of 
London has been proven by its works. That it is capable of 
equally good doings in several of our large cities, and especially 
in the mining and manufacturing regions of our own country, is 
hardly to be doubted. Be that as it may, it is certain that the 
_good work accomplished in and around London, Liverpool, Man- 
"chester, Birmingham, and other great cities of England, is such 
that no Christian church in the old country now ventures to 
question or deny that it is an organization which reaches a class 
which has long been neglected. A movement that has won its 
way against prejudice, and has at last disarmed the hostility of 
wealth, and extorted the praises of the Bench of Bishops, is 
hardly susceptible of being whistled down the winds by clerical 
critics, who do not know what they are talking about. It will 
cause surprise and painful regret to many honest minds, that cer- 
tain of our local clergy have ventured to condemn in harsh 
language an earnest body of men, who are honestly striving, 
and with marked signs of success, to reach the humblest of God's 
creatures, to carry help to the poor, to succor all who are in any 
way distressed, and so to leave the world better than they found 
it. It would have more become Christian ministers to have en- 
deavored to imitate the zealous labors of their more humble co- 
workers. On Monday of last week, both the Presbyterian and 
Methodist Union of preachers condemned General Booth's army 
and all its ways. The Rev. Thos. Filben, Methodist, denounced 
the Salvationists as "religious tramps, whose methods were not 
characteristic of the ways of Christ." The Rev. E. R. Dille was 
even more severe. He said " the army found its converts in the 
gutter. Instead of saying, 'come up to us,' it said, « we will go 
down to you.' And it went down into the ditches and slums of 
the city." That sounds very much like the words of the Phari- 
sees, who complained of the company the Master kept. Christ 
was himself a " tramp " preacher, and bis chosen disciples were 
fishermen, tent-makers and the like. He appears to have disciples 
hereabouts who despise His words and ways. 



WANTED-A REPUBLICAN POLICY. 

SENATORS Wolcott and Teller of Colorado have followed Stew- 
art in the Republican revolt against the Force bill, and even 
Hale of Maine has administered to the venerable form of Gran- 
dam Hoar a contemptuous kick. Quay and Cameron of Penn- 
sylvania are reckoned upon as uncompromising opponents of the 
bill. This is only the beginning of a defection which threatens 
to split the Republican majority in the Senate into two hostile 
fragments. In the face of this danger the garrulous antiquity 
from Massachusetts persists in trying to force upon the country a 
measure whose bare suggestion helped to bring about the most 
tremendous political revolution known for a generation, and 
whose enactment would bury the Republican party deeper than 
the Calaveras skull. In view of the situation to which imbecile 
leadership has brought the organization it is time for Republicans 
who wish to belong to a victorious instead of a decaying party, to 
consider seriously the question of a future policy. The present situ- 
ation has become impossible. Unless sufficient statesmanship can 
be found in its ranks to reform its broken lines in some tenable po- 
sition, the Republican party will suffer the fate of its Federal and 
Whig predecessors. In its early days the party had a good fight- 
ing issue. It opposed the extension of slavery. That was a point 
on which anti-slavery Democrats and anti-slavery Whigs were 
willing to unite, sinking their differences about the tariff in the 
presence of a matter that they considered more important. But, 
now the war is over, and the right of the negro to rule two or 
three States is not a subject that can arouse the old anti-alavery 
enthusiasm. Still, such as it is, the negro question could un- 
doubtedly swing a good many votes even now. Only the Repub- 
lican leaders are trying to combine the fight on this issue with 
another entirely inconsistent with it. They have mortgaged their 
party to the protected trusts. Now it happens that the men who 
might be moved by fanatical appeals to vote as they shot for the 
benefit of the oppressed negro, are the very ones who are the 
chief sufferers from the protective robbery. The force policy and 
the tariff policy are mutually destructive. The same party can- 
not stand with one foot on a platform of crazy enthusiasm for the 
brotherhood of man and the other on a platform of cold, calculat- 
ing greed that sacrifices the poor in all lands to keep up the for- 
tunes of a few overgrown monopolists. Either policy would be 
risky enough — the attempt to combine the two is suicidal. Hoar 
and Quay cannot pull in double harness, as the events of the pres- 
ent winter have sufficiently proved. Can Blaine show his party 
the way out of its scrape? 






SAN FR INC 



AMERICAN INDUSTRIES AND ENGLISH CAPITAL 

SB extremely Interesting data t oul la*t week in 

lahtngton baton the J i\ Committee on 

pration, the Investigation being directed upon tin* question 
of the purchase of American Industries by foreign capital. It baa 
long bren patent to the commercial world that American lodus- 

ivc been inviting the Investment ol foreign, end more pat 
licularly ol Bngltsfa capital, in gradually Increasing ratio for maoy 
year* back, nor Is the reason for this f.ir to Beak. There la such :i 
plethora of capital In England that home Industries and sound 
cannot nearly absorb the surplus. Hence the 
glut and the consequent rush to Invest In any and every 
fatten which holds out even a reasonable hope ol returns, many 
of them of highly problematical value. Mines in Colorado, 
Arir.mn, ItexloOi which e\i-t principally in (he minds of their 
noters * are thrown upon the market, nnd with 
the help of rose-colored ad oaptandum prospectuses, become the 
bait to lure the golden guineas from their snug but unremuner- 
ative nasi In the three per cents., and sink them in some yawn- 
ing shaft where little, if any. " pay rock " has been struck, and 
where the capitalist's millions find their grave equally with the 
widow's mile. It was this hunger for profitable investment 
which was the cause of that earthquake in the financial world 
the other day. when the great house of Barings went down, owing 
to the unrealizable character of the South American investments, 
In which they had plunged with a recklessness foreign to their 
reputation. It was this desire for a thoroughly accredited invest- 
ment which, when the breweries and business of the great Irish 
firm of Guinness & Co., a few years since, was resolved into a 
joint stock company, with shares purchasable in public market, 
caused the four millions sterling, at which the concern was val- 
ued, to be subscribed for twice over the same day, so eager was 
English capital to seek what was known to be a sound and pay- 
ing investment. It is not surprising therefore, that English cap- 
ital should now be turning its attention to investments in the 
various profitable manufacturing concerns, which the vast re- 
sources of this country, rich in agricultural and mineral wealth 
and water power, are developing to a greater and greater extent 
everyday. The investigations of the Congressional Committee 
upon this subject have only just begun, and scarely any statistics 
have yet been arrived at; but it is safe to say that before its 
labors are through, a report will issue which will astound its 
readers, and demonstrate that the investments of English capital 
in land, railroads, manufactures, mines and industries generally, 
are far larger than is at present imagined. The first instance 
which came before the attention of the Commission, dealt with 
the sale of a large milling property, with a capacity of 14,000 bar- 
rels a day, at Minneapolis, including 130 elevators lying along the 
line of the Great Northern Railroad, the total consideration being 
about $8,000,000, in which amount was included $1,750,000 cash 
left by the settlers in the business for a working capital. A good 
deal of toe stock is owned in this country, but the former owners 
thought the most of the stock was held in England. This is only 
one of dozens, perhaps hundreds, of equal importance, and em- 
bracing every form of enterprise in which foreign capital is in- 
vested. The disposal of our own local breweries to an English 
syndicate a month or two ago, is another example of the same 
class. While the economic side of the question is considered of 
sufficient importance to make it the subject of a Congressional 
Commission, its political side must not be kept out of consideration. 
Capital, like water, flows in the channels of least resistance. 



THE SIOUX COMEDY. 



THE world is still waiting for the great American novel and the 
great American drama; but it ought not to wait much longer 
for the great American comic opera. The incidents of the pres- 
ent Indian war will furnish ample material for that. There is no 
more heroically humorous figure in the Pirate.t of Penzance than 
young Jack Red Cloud stalking into the beleaguered Pine Ridge 
Agency, with a gunny sack over his shoulder, to get his father's 
mail, especially the daily papers containing accounts of the move- 
ments of the troops. When we follow the youthful Cloud to the 
breakfast table of the hotel, with the reporters examining the 
streaks of war-paint in his hair, and asking him for interviews 
concerning the probable date of his armed descent upon the 
agency, we have one scene all ready for the stage. There is no 
need of adding a single touch. In fact, any extra touch would 
be merely reducing delicious comedy to extravagant farce. It is 
hard to imagine what sort of embellishment could be added, un- 
less we introduced General Miles dancing a jig on his head, and 
President Harrison playing football in his grandfather's hat. 
When savages go to war because the census returns do not suit 
them, and prepare for battle by sending one of their Chiefs to 
town to get the daily papers, their messenger, in the course of 
his mission, ordering breakfast at a hotel, washing the war-paint 
off his face, and sitting down at the table with the people he 
means to scalp, things appear to be getting rather mixed. The 
mixture becomes still more apparent when we hear of civilized 
soldiers deliberately killing women and children. Who says that 
life in America is tame and monotonous? 



THE Behring's Sea difficulty has narrowed down to the point 
the News Letter has all along declared it must come to at 
last. It is now a question merely of how best to protect and per- 
petuate seal life. The contention that a part of the open ocean is a 
mare clausum, or closed sea, has practically been given up, as 
close observers of the controversy saw from the first it would 
have to be. It was a claim that never ought to have been made. 
Salisbury refined it down to an absurdity when he offered to sub- 
mit it to arbitration. Our claim was not as against England 
alone, but as against the whole world, and therefore an impartial 
arbitrator could not be obtained. The case would have been de- 
cided against us in advance. Mr. Blaine evidently saw this, and, 
with his usual astuteness, extricated himself from a false position 
by agreeing to arbitration, but insisting upon a new statement of 
the issue to be arbitrated. In making up that issue, he is careful 
to say nothing about a mare clausum, but confines himself to 
questions relating to a closed season rather than to a closed sea. 
As Salisbury long ago intimated that Great Britain would cheer- 
fully act in concert with the United States in devising means to 
protect the seals during breeding season, there is now a substan- 
tial agreement between the parties, and nothing remains but to 
send a joint commission to the Behring to ascertain the facts and 
report what action is necessary in the premises. It is a rational 
conclusion of a very simple question that was obvious from the 
first, and ought not to have taken so much time and trouble to 
reach. It is a curious incident, in this connection, that Secretary 
Blaine's latest correspondence does not bear out the interpretation 
of it that was given to the press in advance. Close observers will 
not fail to have noticed that the same thing almost invariably 
occurs in regard to the present Secretary of State's official cor- 
respondence. He knows that first impressions go a long way, 
and that when the public once thinks it is informed, it seldom 
takes trouble to correct itself. Blaine, in this case, has succeeded 
in leaving the impression that he has given the British lion's tail 
a mighty lot of twisting, and that is probably all he cares about. 
As a matter of fact, he has, in a cloud of words, reached substan- 
tially the same conclusions that Salisbury arrived at in language 
that was brief and direct. It is all well that ends well. The 
sting has been taken out of the Behring's Sea question, and its 
settlement is in sight. 



\ km - ii" nri;. 

OHKATTNQ AT THK CUSTOMS HOI 

Smi GOING, undervaluation! and other devices i 
l noli ■ Bern out of a portion of hi* customs revenue are nol 
by quite a large number ol people, other 
ile, n in- would reaenl as an Insult tin- expression ol 
a doobl n- to their entire honesty. Perhaps there la ■ 
for this in* condition of commercial morality. The law should not 
offer a premium on dishonesty, nor put the crooked dealer a( an 
advantage over the square one. Whilst money Is to i"' easily and 
safely mode by simply doctoring a piece of paper called " a salted 
invoice " the operation will be pretty sure to go on, nnd those will- 
ing to take advantage Of it will continue tO grow dishonestly rich. 

The worst of It is that the Importer who would do right If he could 

is compelled to do wrong in order to compete in the market with 
his dishonestly inclined rival in business. Duties levied according 
to the market value of goods always will be more or less evaded, 
To say that the certificate of such men as we send abroad as Con- 
suls is sullicient evidence of value is to talk nonsense, and to set 
the results of experience at defiance. Even when our Consuls are 
above temptation, which does not always prove to be the case, 
they are not experts as to the value of the whole round of goods 
we import, and are therefore incapable, in any event, of doing the 
work expected of them. Starting out with untrained and fallible 
judgments, they cannot be held accountable for passing valuations 
that are grossly inadequate. Thus it comes that our whole sys- 
tem of customs entries is provocative of fraud. There is reason 
to believe that, during the present administration, affairs at the 
San Francisco Customs House have been considerably improved. 
For some time previously they were in a deplorable condition. 
Honest merchants found competitors in the market able to under- 
sell them at rates less than cost price. It was clear that full du- 
ties were not being paid at the Customs House. To complain was 
distasteful, if not useless. No wonder, then, that in time importers 
feel that there is nothing to be done but to cheat Uncle Sam. It 
appears that quite a thriving business is being done over the bor- 
der in this matter of fraudulent invoices. The press dispatches 
say that the United States government has been cheated out of 
millions. Some twenty of our Consuls are reported to be im- 
plicated in receiving large fees for certifying to invoices showing 
very palpable undervaluations. Consular certificates were, for a 
consideration, issued in blank for the use of exporters making 
false invoices of goods sent to the United States. The certificates 
are said to have been issued in large numbers, and to have covered 
a great swindle. There can be no doubt but that the same kind 
of thing applies to many of our European importations. If we 
must have high duties they should be collected on a safer principle. 

THE BEHRING'S SEA DIFFICULTY. 




ALTERNATE smiles and tears have been the characteristics of 
the New Year so far, but the smiles have been accompanied 
by some of the heaviest frosts of the season, which the early morning 
hours discover Iving thickly on doorsteps and sidewalks, while the 
sharpness of the'evening air disposes one to seek the comfort of their 
own fireside rather than to look for pleasures away from it- How- 
ever, there have not been many evening entertainments to tempt one 
abroad, and I think that on the whole our fashionables are rather 
pleased than otherwise that teas should have torrued the popular 
mode of entertaining this winter. It certainly looks like it, when 
those evening parties that have taken place of late have been so 

Soorlv attended, and this was so decidedly the case at the last Friday 
right that one of the managers was heard to exclaim about mid- 
night, '* I <L'il ire it almost tempts a fellow to wash his hands of the 
whole business and sav ' no more of it for me.' " 

When so many complaints are made about the dullness of the sea- 
son and so little going on, it does seem as if the utterers were not 
sincere in what they say when they fail to avail themselves of what 
is ottered. Still, in this case, there were two excuses to be made. One 
was, that Del Monte still claimed many who went down there for the 
holidays— (regarding which, par paranthese, and especially the New 
Year's Eve hop— I have not yet met any who are very enthusiastic, 
though all admit that nearly every adjunct was there to make it en- 
joyable. But something was missing, and theconundrum is, what?) 
Another excuse was, unpleasant news received from the seat of the 
Indian warfare, which removes yet more of our military beaux from 
us, with the prospect of all of them being called away, should the 
fight continue. It is, therefore, scarcely a matter for wonder, that 
girls feel blue, and the men disinclined for merriment. But upon the 
whole it was not so bad as it might have been. The decorations 
lighted up prettily— the ladies were becomingly costumed— the cotil- 
lion, under the leadership of Mr. Greenway, who introduced some 
new features, went off well in spite of the very decided stupidity of 
some of the dancers in getting through the figures, and the supper 
was good. 

It is the exception which proves the rule, so when I say that teas 
have proved the most welcome form of dissipation this season. I 
must also add that possibly the exception was Miss Sperry's cUbut, 
which took place at the tea at Mrs. Will Crocker's last Saturday 
afternoon. Not that the gathering was anything but delightful in 
itself, but society bad from constant iteration brought itself to feel 
sure that the event would be signalized by a ball, and therefore, per- 
haps, just a tinge of disappointment was mingled with the pleasure 
with which the tea cards were received. The day itself was one of 
those which were all smiles and could not have been improved upon, 
while inside the entire lower portion of the house was thrown open, 
and prettily though sparingly decorated, chiefly with roses and 
smilax.and the charming hostess was assisted by her sister, Miss 
Btth Sperry, and a bevy of pretty girls and young matrons to make 
the very large assemblage of gue>ts who thronged the rooms feel 
at home examining the many beautiful and rare objects of art with 
which they are tilled and listening to the musical selections given by 
Mrs. Milzner-Hamilton and the Ferrar family. But whatever dis- 
appointment was felt regarding the tea. it has been quite dispelled 
by the announcement that the long-talked-of ball will take place on 
the 20th, for which Mrs. Crocker has just sent out cards, and it will 
undoubtedly be the event of the present season. 

Monday evening was given to the Balwin where a number of 
theatre parties welcomed the Juch Opera Co. in The Flying Dutchman, 
society being also well represented singly and in couples all through 
the house. It is on the cards, says a society gossip, that before very 
long we are to have an amateur entertainment, which will cause the 
Hess and the Juch Opera Companies to "pale their ineffectual fires." 
Of course it is to be tor Charity, and will, it is said, combine all the 
talent of our best society. And then towards the end of the month 
another entertainment is to be given by the King's Daughters at 
Odd Fellows' Hall, in aid of the Home for Incurables, of which the 
musical portion will be by Professor Troyer and Mrs. Ella Sterling 
Cummings will be Manageress in Chief. 

Tuesday evening the Club of '90 held their second gathering at the 
residence of Frank Pixley on Union street, and Mrs. Pixley is so 
well known as a most charming hostess it is almost needless to say 
the party was a pleasant one. The dinners at Mrs. Tevis's on Tues- 
day evening, and at Mrs. Goad's on Wednesday evening were in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon, who, having changed their mind 
about remaining here all winter, leave for New York to-day. 

Oakland has been very gay this month. In addition to theTucker- 
McNear wedding on New Year's eve, there were two weddings New 
Year's day ; that of Miss Mills and Mr. Hotcbkiss at noon, and in the 
evening the nuptials of Miss Jennie Waters and Mr. William Bowers, 
were celebrated at the First Congregational Church, the Rev. Dr. Mc- 
Lane performing the ceremony. The bride was attended by the Misses 
Claire Ralston, Kate Clement'and Violet Whitney, and Miss Florence 
Reed was maid of honor. Mr. Sam Bell McKee was the groom's best 
man, and the reception which followed was held at the Snell Semin- 
ary. Thursday evening of this week Mrs. Kirkham gave one of her 
pleasant musicales, and last night the Oakland Cotillion Club danced 
their German under the leadership of Mr. James A. Folger. 

The wedding of Miss Mildred Fuller to Mr. Hugh C. Wallace was 
celebrated in Washington, D. C, on Monday last with greatcclat, the 
ceremony taking place in St. John'sChurch'the Rev. Daniel Weston, 
of New York, performing the ceremony in the presence of a very 
large and fashionable assemblage of friends. The bride, who was 
given away by her father, Chief Justice Fuller, of the Supreme Bench, 
was attended by five bridesmaids, and her sister, Miss Kate Fuller, 
as maid of honor, and was costumed in a beautiful robe of white 
satin, trimmed with point lace and orange blossoms, her sole orna- 



ment being a crescent of diamonds, the gift of the groom. The 
bridesmaids wore gofluis of yellow crepe de chine, the maid of honor, 
white of the same material. Mr. Thomas B. Walker, of Tacoma, 
supported the groom. The reception, which followed the ceremony, 
at the Fuller residence, was one of the most brilliant of the season, 
the many dislinguisbed guests including the Pre-ident, Vice Presi- 
dent, and members of the Cabinet, with their wives and daughters, 
the Assistant Justices of the Supreme Court, etc., many coming from 
different parts of the Union for the occasion. 

The next wedding in Washington of interest to California will be that 
of Miss Florence Audenreid to Count Fore-ua di Divonne, which will 
take place on Wednesday of next week. Miss Audenreid has many 
friends in San Francisco, and her father, the late Colonel Audenreid, 
is kindly remembered by many of our residents, he having paid this 
city a visit with General W. T. Shertuan, whose aide he was in 1870, 
when the party were very extensively entertained. 

Mrs. Maria Bailey and Commander Norris were married at Min- 
ister Swift's residence in Tokio, Japan, on Monday last. 

A large party went up to Sacramento yesterday to attend the in- 
augural ball of Governor Markham, which took place in the Capital 
City last night. Everything indicated that it would be a very oril- 
liaut affair, the guests from San Franci>co, including King Kala- 
kaua and suite, Admiral Brown, General Gibbon and staff, General 
Dimond and other members of the National Guard. Mrs. E. B. 
Crocker placed her residence in Sacramento at the disposal of His 
Majesty during his stay in that city. 

Mrs. Edgar Carroll, nre Hauchette, held the firstof her wedding re- 
ceptions at the residence of her sister, Mrs. Rutherford, on Bush 
street, last Thursday. She will receive there on Thursday of next 
week also, and on Monday, the 2ijch, will be at home to her friends 
at the California Hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Tubbs are spending the winter at 2217 
Van Ness avenue. Mr. and Mrs. James Robinson are also in town 
for the rest of the season, and are domiciled at the California, where 
Mrs. Robinson will receive on Mondays. Mrs. and the Misses Gash- 
wiler have made the Pleasantun their headquarters. Miss Jessie 
Bowie and Mr. Allen Bowie have taken possession of their handsome 
new residence on Jackson street. Dr. and Mrs. Albert Bowie are at 
the California Hotel for the winter. Mrs. Floyd and her daughter, 
and Miss Matthews are passing the winter monthsat the Hotel Rafael. 

It is reported that Baron and Baroness Von Sbroeder contemplate 
an early departure for Germany, which country they will make their 
future home. They will be a loss to society", and" their departure 
will occasion much regret. Should the rumor prove true when the 
Russian Consul General, Mr. A. E. Olarovsky, who was so popular 
with some of our society people several years ago, went from our 
gaze recalled to his native land, he left behind him a number of 
friends who will no doubt be pleased to hear that he is once more to 
serve under the shadow of the Stars and Stripes, he having just been 
appointed Consul General in New York city. The consecration of 
the new St. Mary's Cathedral on Van Ness Avenue takes place to- 
morrow, and it is said the ceremonies will be truly magnificent and 
the music well worth hearing. All Catholic ceremonials are not a 
crush but a jam, and I doubt if there be standing room even in the 
street in the vicinity of the church to-morrow, this ceremonial being 
one of a life-time. 

Mr. Horace Davis has gone to Japan and China on a trip combi- 
ning business and pleasure. 

The Deckers have returned to town for the winter. Miss Alice 
Decker is a most charming young lady, devoted to the cause of the 
free Kitchen Garden, described in last week's News Letter, She is 
unfailing in her attendance, coining over from San Rafael every Sat- 
urday during the summer to take her place in the ranks of the 
teachers. Felix. 

UY Jos. Tetley & Go's " Elephant" brand of Ceylon and India 
Teas in lead packets. Unadulterated, fragrant, delicious. 

We desire to call attention to the sale by Messrs. Easton, EldridgeAs 
Co., in Irving Hall, on Thursday, January loth, at 2 p. m., of a choice 
collection of oil paintings, by Henry Alexander, a Californian born. 
This is the first offering of his works, and an opportunity for con- 
noisseurs of the lovely art to secure one of them. 

Miss May Duncan, who, at the request of the ladies of Pacific 
Heights, recently opened a class for instruction in the Delsarte sys- 
tem of physical culture as well as dancing, gives a matinee to-day at 
the parlors of Armory, Light Battery "A," 1617 Pacific Avenue. 
Dancing Irom 2 to 4 p. m. 

Mrs. Cool, dentist. Room 10, Chronicle Building — All branches of 
dentistry practiced; cleaning, polishing and beautifying the teeth a 
specialty. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 



B 







W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIC COAST, 

123 California St.. S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



FOR SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan. 10, 



SAN PR VNCIS< NEWS I ETTKR 



WORTHY CHARITIES 
(By Vi Vi 



■ 

; 

IN ft quiet. UMMtoOtetloai way n grtftt «!e»1 ol gOOd >» boiiifc dOD6 
In Ibis jjroal city of owfl by charitAble organiwilions, supported 
by ihr jctnerons-hcartetl public. From time to lime BtAteaiBlltfl 
of the work *oconiplishe<l, with Appeals for the substantial *X- 
n of sympathy to tbe donation! ol money and goods, are 
sent to tho?e vrhOM charitable intent is well known. Afl the 
present lime is the moment ol emergent)?! when all Institutions 
depending upon voluntary contributions for their support anxi- 
ously scan the horizon for the signs of sustenance for the com- 
ing year, such appeals are urgent. The New* Letter, ever ready 
to respond lo the call of charity, and following its established 
loot to extend a helping hand to struggling enterprises, 
gladly assumes the duty of bringing such causes before the public 
and bespeakes for them an earnest attention and a generous 
response. 

The first of these is The Pacific Rescue Home Association For 
Erring Women. Their first annual report states that the Board 
of Directors is composed of the following named gentlemen, with 
the Rev. J. W. Ellsworth as Manager: Rev. Win. H. Scudder, E. 
A. Qiirin, N. K. Strong, Rev. John Hannon, Rev. M. IX Buck, L. 
8. Sherman, Geo. S. Montgomery and L. S. Ellert. One year ago 
the Association assumed management of what was then known as 
the " Home of Refuge," at the same time assuming the debts of 
the " Home," amounting to nearly two hundred dollars. Mrs. A. 
R. Sheriff was engaged as matron, and, from that time down to 
the present, has discharged the duties of her trying position in a 
most satisfactory manner. "She has endeared herself to many a 
lonely heart, and has been an instrument in the hands of our 
Master in leading those who were apparently lost to a full know- 
ledge of Christ's ability to save." The association is now fully 
organized under the State of incorporation. On the 19th of July, 
1889, the date upon which the Board entered upon its work, not 
a dish of any kind or a piece of furniture belonged to them in the 
" Home." To-day they have household and office furniture to 
the value of $1,700, with liabilities at less than $200. After a few 
months in the work the Board were compelled to make several 
improvements to the house of which they have a lease. This was 
made possible through the kindness of Mr. J. B. Stetson, whose ef- 
ficient co-operation has been invaluable. This gentleman, writ- 
ing to the manager of the Home, in an open letter which has been 
electrotyped for distribution among the charitably inclined, says: 
" I visited the Pacific Rescue Home last Saturday. The house is 
in a pleasant, but secluded part of the city, and appears com- 
fortable and well-adapted for the purpose intended. I was shown 
over the building," further writes Mr. Stetson, "and the history 
of some of the women told me. The purposes of the Home are 
worthy, and should be encourage by all philanthropic and humane 
people.'' 

For some time past, the following sdvertisement has appeared 
in the columns of the daily press: 

WOMEN "WHO HAVE FALLEN, AND WISH 
to reform, can find a Christian home and 
friends by addressing REV. J. W. ELLSWORTH, 
1014 Washington street. 

To this notice many responses have been received, heart rend- 
ing in their life history, pitiful in the anxiety for a chance to es- 
cape from lives of degradation, to find a chance to reform. In the 
past year there were 136 applicants for admission to the home ; 54 
were admitted, five of these subsequently left without permission, 
leaving a balance of 49 who were thus disposed of: Three were 
sent away as unworthy, three were taken to the City and County 
Hospital, two transferred to Oakland, for sixteen employment 
was found, twelve were returned to their parents, one was mar- 
ried from the Home, and twelve remain there. During the year 
$4,229.10 were received. In the hands of the Treasurer there re- 
mains a balance of less than $22,50. The institution must have 
money. How can they get it? By appealing to the public. 

During the month of March, 1890, Mrs. D. D. McWade, who 
for years has been working for the uplifting of the erring in Oak- 
land, was compelled from loss of health to give up her work. 
She kindly offered to turn over the Oakland Home and furniture 
to the Pacific Rescue Home Association, and to aid the Board as 
much as possible in their work. Her offer was accepted, and 
there was established what is known as the "Mother's Home." 
Mrs. S. C. Russell, as its matron, has done noble and erficicent 
work. To the business men of San Francisco the Association 
greatfully acknowledges its many causes for deep obligations and 
begs that this year the same sources will help it to extend and 
effectively carry on this great work.. The business office of the 
Association is 520 Kearny street. The hours are from 9 a. m. to 4 
p. m. Those interested in such charitable and reformatory enter- 
prises are cordially invited to call and meet the Manager, Rev. J. 
W. Ellsworth for further information. 

The "Sheltering Arms" for the rescue of unfortunate women, 



with the parish of inmtv . ban h 
c * rlv l' w»rk having - raal liumtni under 

the inspiration of the K«v. J. Saund.-r* C . I Blstof Id 
ristar in charge, n j arts re. ,.,pt* amountln 

ol doom rout .uni , long Una .<r donation! fur table us,- Forty- 
two \v.., m -n have ad. in tbi mrlv fail a ganeroaa lay- 

mnn * Mr ■*« W. Gibba. of Grace Church, presented iliur 

•Julia with a permanent bouse "f fourteen mom?, for her work 
The nppar floor with lie Ova room a baa been Btted up for the 
shelter and care ol ibe alck In general. "Trinity Infirmary," a* 
the Mat It called, will furnish hoard, nuratng and medical attend 
»ncc at prices ranging from elx to ten dollars a week for board, 
according to accommodation. The rooms are clean and pretty 
and the patient may be aaanred the best of attention. Dre. Tom n 
send, Mattiner and Herd Ink art- the physicians in attendance 
The Masons presented sister J nil a n lot in their cemetery, which la 
now known as "Slater Julia's i lorner." These worthy enterprises 
depend upon the generosity of the public. May the 
full and speedy 1 

" We have a chord in common," said the wood-sawyers, when 
they began to work on the same pile, the Grand Central Wine 
Kooms, 16-18 Third street, have a cord in common with the public 
in their laudable ellorls to supply wholesome and invigorating drinks 
to counteract the effects of the damp weather on the corporeal struc- 
ture of their customers. 



Sterling is no relative word, but carries its full meaning on its face. 
A sterling firm, goods that are sterling, needs no explanation. They 
are unqualified and reliable. Under this category comes the firm of 
J. M. Litchfield tfc Co.. the merchant and military tailors, as well as 
the goods sold bv them at 12 Post street. 



Rainbow Crepe Kimonos at Marsh's, under Palace Hotel. 




EUGENIE FACE POWDER. 



Mas. GRAHA'MS Eugenie Face Powder is deli- 
cate, soft, impalpable, invisible, ^oes not rub off, 
and is as harmless as a rose leaf placed against the 
cheek. la three shades— Cream-white, Flesh, and 
a very pretty uew Brunette shade. Price 50 cents. 

All druggists keep it, or will order it for their 
customers. Sent by mail on receipt of postal uote 
or stamps. 

Mrs. GRAHAM, " Beauty Doctor," 103 Post at, 
treats Ladies for all blemises or defects of face or 
figure. Superfluous hair removed by electrolysis 

DAUPHIN! DAUPHIN! DAUPHIN! 



'&/*»**• j^**~. 



Any person transacting business up to the 9th of January with 

M. A. DAUPHIN, of New Orleans, 

CAN SEND 

Package containing not less than Five Dollars, 

BY EXPRESS, FREE OP EXPENSE. 
JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medals, Paris 1878—1889. 
4^-These Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
States, MR. HY. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



Fine Table §J? 
WINES *fc 



From our Celebrated 

ORLEANS VINEYARD 




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£30 WASHINCTOH ST. 

san Francisco 



Grsnsral -A.3srl.c:ie0 

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DETROIT 
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JOS. R. PEEBLES SOUS' CO.. Pile's Bldg. 

HONOLULU 
HAMILTON JOHNSON 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 




We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



IF there are or were any savage breasts in San Francisco they 
should be soothed effectually by this time, for the town is full 
of music. Opera is in the ascendant. With the EoiroaJnch 
Company at the Baldwin and the Hess Opera Company at the 
Orpheum, with rumors of other operatic engagements; with con- 
certs and piano recitals announced or still ringing in our ears, a 
musical comedy coming to the California and the ever present 
Tivoli Opera Company, with its unrivaled orchestra, there seems 
to pervade the world of pleasure, at least, an atmosphere of uni- 
versal harmony. San Francisco claims to be a music-loving and, 
above all, an opera-loving town; and despite the shrugs and 
anathemas of disappointed artists, this much abused outside bar- 
barian of cities actually seems to justify its claims in the un- 
deniable fact that every good operatic company that appears 
here is munificently supported. 

• # * # 

The opening at the Baldwin, Monday night, of the Emma Juch 
Opera Company was a brilliant one as to the attendance, and an 
ever memorable one as to the production. To every one with an 
ear and a soul, the stock jests at Wagnerian music fade into air 
when that music is heard. The mysterious and ghostly legend of 
The Flying Dutchman is a theme that fits itself naturally to Wag- 
ner's music. The deep and almost supernatural suggestiveness 
of the wonderful orchestration carries the soul of the listener 
into the realms of Gerraanesque mysticism, whose spirit breathes 
through the work of the German composer. The least active 
imagination is roused and moved to comprehension of the feelings 
of the chief actors in the weird drama. Miss Juch's singing of 
Senta has been one of her greatest triumphs, but her dramatic 
and even strongly emotional identification with the young girl, 
whose romantic devotion lifted her life out of the simple lines of 
a pretty comedy into a dark but inspiring tragedy, was some- 
what of a surprise, and has given the prima donna a place in the 
heart as well as the admiration of San Francisco. The doomed 
and gloomy Dutchman was as admirably represented by Otto 
Rathjens, who not only sang and looked his part, but endued it 
with a magnetism that drew the sympathetic understanding of 
his audience. The Erik of Mr. Charles Hedmondt would have 
been notable for its excellence without the note explaining his 
assuming the role at an hour's notice. If any apology were in- 
tended in this announcement, it was more than needless, as both 
his singing and acting were gems in a really remarkable perform- 
ance. The stride forward taken by Franz Vetta (Daland) since 
last here, in the vocal and dramatic requirements of opera, would 
be surprising to those unacquainted with his natural talents and 
enthusiastic study. The beautiful song of the steersman was 
pleasantly sung by Will Stephens, and the minor parts were in 
keeping with the general excellence. If there was a weak point, 
it was in the choruses, which were disappointing when one 
realized their possibilities. 

# * » 

Tuesday night Faust was produced, with Madame von Janu- 
schowsky as Marguerite. She has not an altogether agreeable 
voice, but she knows how to use it, and with a somewhat hard 
manner in general, came out with much dramatic force in the 
scenes where this quality is most requisite — in the prison scene and 
that at the church. Louise Meislinger, who in the small part of 
Mary the night before had made a most favorable impression, 
was a fascinating and charming as well as melodious Siebel, 
making so personable a figure of that discarded swain as to have 
created in most feminine breasts a doubt as to Marguerite's good 
taste, had Mr. Hedmont been a less attractive Faust. Mr. Hed- 
mondt's enunciation is, by the way, peculiarly clear, pure, and 
pleasant to hear. Martha was well sung by Mary Freebert, and 
Leo Stormont was an exceptionally good Valentine. To the 
average auditor the central figure of Gounod's opera will always 
be Mephistopbeles, and Franz Vetta amply satisfied both the 
vocal and the dramatic requirements of this salient character of 
opera, even for those who remember Conly, the ideal Mephisto 
of America. The audience was in number below the deserts of 
the performance, but this seems inevitable *on what we are wont, 
somewhat discourteously it may be, to call the » off nights " of 
a grand opera season — that is, one in which the star does not 
shine. 

* # » 

One of the most brilliant productions of the week was that of 
Lohengrin Wednesday night. At an early hour the house was 
packed from gallery to parquet, and not a seat was to be had by 
the time the curtain went up. Lohengrin is more familiar to our 
opera-goers than The Flying Dutchman, which helps to account for 
the extraordinary pressure for seats. Elsa's first solo, "My 
Guardian, my Defender," was exquisitely sung, and the river 
scene with the arrival of the swan-drawn boat bringing the 
"knight in golden armor," was beautiful and effective. The in- 



creased size of the Baldwin stage tells to advantage in the scenic 
productions of the present opera season. 
In 

Next week's repertory at the Baldwin will include Tannhauser, 
II Trovatore, and Der Freischutz, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day evenings, respectively. 

* # * 

Little Lord Fauntleroy has made his reappearance among us at 
the California, and in very attractive guise. The little lord, as a 
brunette, is an innovation that one can hardly reconcile himself 
to, yet little Gertie Homan is an exceptionally gifted little actress. 
There is lacking, however, that apparently unconscious childish- 
ness that made little Wallie Eddingerseem to be the heir of Dorin- 
court instead of acting it, while another charm which we all re- 
member — a charm so rare on the stage — of the flush of rosy color 
that came and went with every motion, is effectually lost in the 
highly painted cheeks of the little actress. Georgie Cooper, how- 
ever, is a blonde, so the uncertain public can pay its money and 
take its choice. Miss Minnie Radcliffe is a graceful and sympa- 
thetic " Dearest." Mr. Hobbs (Russell Bassett) is all that a simple- 
minded American grocer need be; the part of the aventuress, 
Minna, is very well taken by Miss Dorothy Rossmore, while 
Georgie Woodthorpe (off the stage the mother of one of the little 
Fauntleroys) makes a lively Mary, the New York servant-girl. 
Mr. Havisham, as the confidential lawyer of a high and mighty 
English Earl, might be a trifle more polished, and the Earl of 
Dorincourt would be better if he were worse. Mr. Aiken seems 
a little premature in taking the audience into his confidence as to 
the fact that he is going to be a real good Earl before we are done 
with him. The play is a beautiful idyl, with a wholesome les- 
son which the San Franciscan juvenile needs, namely, that a boy 
may be a thoroughbred little gentleman without being a milksop. 
It has another week at the California. 

The third week of U and J at the Bush Street Theatre has been 
a continuation of its previous success. Next Monday night Miss 
Adelaide Moore, an "Irish girl," will appear at the Bush as Juliet 
with Mr. Joseph Wheelock for her Romeo. Miss Moore comes 
with a reputation in this favorite part for handsome actresses, and 
is expected not to play second to the various Julieti who have 
dawned on our delighted gaze from the stage of the Bush. 
< < * 

The Tivoli management evidently realizes that "while the lamp 
holds out to burn" there is no use changing it. Aladdin's Won- 
derful Lamp seems one of that kind, and without continuing the 
quotation to any invidious reference to "vilest sinners" who 
"may return," it may be remarked that those who have already 
seen the spectacle come back to see it once more, and always find 
some thing new to enjoy. 

» » # 

In Her Atonement the Alcazar has one of the most effective of its 
recent productions. The Alcazar people are, for the most part, 
well-suited in the cast, and the military maneuvers, in which the 
Veteran Guard of California takes part, are more than ordinarily 
well carried out. 

» * # 

Aida, with Guille as Rhadames and Francesca Guthrie and 
Camille Muori as the rivals, proved a strong card at the Orpheum, 
as was predicted. Guille was at his best on Tuesday night, and 
Guille'' s best leaves no more to be asked, as a most enthusiastic 
audience seemed to believe. The tragic interest of the story 
added to the majestic movement and melodious charm of the 
music makes this opera a universal favorite, and its selection was 
a wise one. Sunday night L'Allemand will appear in The Daugh- 
ter of the Regiment. 

* * # 

The Olympian Club Skating Rink at the Pavilion seems to be 
growing rather than decreasing in favor. Since the Reverend 
Talmadge's indorsement of the exercise, even the devout and se- 
rious-minded may find therein a "holy joy" as well as health 
and an increased circulation. From the character of the majority 
of its clientage, it is evident that Prof. Ridgely's efforts to main- 
tain a high standard of propriety at the rink have met with the 
success they deserve. 

* # * 

The Battle of Gettysburg at the Panorama Building, corner 
Tenth and Market, is an instructive as well as interesting ex- 
hibition. If teachers would take their classes to see this realistic 
picture of the war, they would do much toward imbuing the 
young minds with a desire for a more extended knowledge of 
American history. 

* * • 

The dates of the popular Saturday afternoon concerts, recently 
announced to be given by Mrs. Carmichael-Carr, pianist, and Mr. 
Sigmund Beel, violinist, have been fixed for January 17-31, and 
February 14-28, at Irving Hall. The principals will be assisted 
by Messrs. L. Heine, violoncellist, L. Schmidt (viola), and Donald 
de V. Graham, vocalist. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



BAN Ki; INCI9C0 \r\vs i ETTER, 



The drain of Ktnnta Abbot I li .1 loM 10 thr world ol Optra that 
will n Im an, I her urn-; 

>D4 mar not --.ml thr ts.irriion.lMit thr orgtlllM- 

tion which fth« «■> skillfully » ml energetically directed ffu 
mancnl an>l rcli»'-: musical enjoyment. And always ■ 

welcome <>np to San Francisco. Since her sudden death the many 
UU of ktndmn and real, helpful charity, which have 00 m« t<> 
light in regard to Htsa Abbott, add t<» the 51nc.Tr regrel with 
Which thi« city, where the was well known, learned ol her unex- 
pected death in the prime of her Miccessful career. 

• • • 

The Steffi 0/ Pari*, at the Panorama building, corner Eddy and 
Mason streets, has gained greatly in Interest by its wonderfully 
realistic storm effects. 

• ■ « 

Tbe Baldwin management announces that Lohengrin will be re- 
peated next Wednesday evening. 

• * • 

The first week of grand opera at the Baldwin ends to-night with 
Oarnu n, lieorges Bizet's very popular opera, with Miss .Tucu in the 
title role. 

• • • 

One of the most important productions of the Juch Opera sea- 
son at the Baldwin will he Wagner's Die Walkurc, Monday night, 
January 19, for the first time in San Francisco. 

* • • 

After Little Lord Faunileroy, the California will have Miss Mc~ 
QitUy, with «' the sparkling " Fay Templeton and Charlie Reed 
among the stars. It promises a sensation — if the universal east- 
ern critic knows one when he feels it. and tells the truth about it. 

The Alcazar Company will start on a country tour at the end of 
the present production, when Joseph Grismer and Phu-be Davies 
come to the Alcazar. 

* » » 

Lotta, in Musette, comes to the Baldwin January 2Gth, to stay a 
fortnight. 

* * * 

Denman Thompson will soon revive Joshua Wkitcomb to take 
the place of The Old Homestead, which has had such an unparal- 
leled run at the Academy of Music, New York. Of these two 
plays and their author a New York paragrapher says: » No one 
in this country has done more to soften the barrier of prejudice 
existing between church and stage than Denman Thompson." 

* » # 

The Tivoli will put on tbe stage, Monday night, tbe popular 
Widow O'Brien. 



WHAT THEY MISSED. 



WE are accustomed to think of the Romans under the Empire 
as being the most luxurious livers the world has ever seen. 
Lucullus dining with Lucullus has passed into a proverb, and 
the feasts of Apicius are celebrated by more than one classical 
writer as the very acme of good cheer and refined gastronomy. 
And yet, when we reflect upon their banquets, we see that they 
must have missed two things at least which we of to-day consider 
not as luxuries, but as articles of necessity — butter and sugar. 
There is, in all tbe annals of Latin feasting, no mention uf butter, 
nor of anything corresponding to it; while, as to sugar, the only 
substitute which was known for it was honey. There is a theory 
that the Greeks knew something of molasses, but it is not sup- 
ported by sufficient evidence to make it generally received. Nor 
do sugar and butter by any means exhaust the list of common 
articles of food of which the ancient Romans bad no knowledge. 
There is no indication that bread, in the sense in which we use it, 
was a common article of food; that several of our most common 
spices were known to them, or that pastry in any form was an 
article of diet; while as to tea, coffee and chocolate, we know that 
they were in a state of lamentable ignorance. By a queer perver- 
sion of taste, as it seems to us, they cooked certain meats with 
assofcetida, and these were considered great delicacies, but we can 
very readily concede this distinction to them. The fact is that 
tbe table of the richest and most luxurious Roman was not so 
well-furnished, so far as palatable viands and well-cooked food are 
concerned, as the table of the American day laborer of the present 
day. The Romans gorged themselves with animal food, washed 
down with huge beakers of heady wine, but of the genuine pleas- 
ures of a well-cooked meal, with that variety which is the best 
spice of comestibles as well as of life, they had very little concep- 
tion. They spent enormous sums of money on their banquets, 
ransacking the known world for meats and fish in great numbers, 
but, when these had been procured, their gastronomic devices 
were at an end. Think of a race, the conquers of the world, that 
knew nothing of canvas-back duck and terrapin and shad, and 
we can understand, in part, what the Romans missed. 



Mrs. Julia Melville-Snyder's system of instruction is pronounced 
perfect for the development of the vocal organs in her pupils of both 
sexes. Studio, 138 McAllister street. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Mr. Al. BtTa irl.l..r 1 Mb, Airiir.n RmviiR. Mun.jor. 

EMMA JUCH GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY 1 
-i«y IUudco-EIOOLBITO. BaUudu M;i.i caumkn 
Ni\t Willi— Motility, TmoohUMi (Jim i, Bllnbotb). Tuc-lav. II 

£? T " l: "" ''*■'' '''' r Kr,i " h '"' ' n0B ~'" u N " v ' "" 

jut, .tmnwry luh-La-t Week ol the Opera tod Fir-I ProdtwHon 

i Uuiorpl I'll \v\i 

irche«tr« iod Dress ClroU, 13; Bil r, 11 SO ud »i. < i i> n < - r v 

50 Ci'llt>. " 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

ftnn ! lire In the World. 

Mr. Al Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor | Mr. Harry Mann Manager 

Every Evening. Matinee Saturday. The Domestic Dramatic Wyl, 

LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY I 

Presented with a Perfect Cast and Appropriate Mounting, The Bloude 
Beamy, Gejrgie Cooper, as the LI i tic Lord. 
Saturday Matinee- GRBTIB Human a, Fauutleroy. 
Seats Now Selling. 



NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt. .Lessee and Proprietor | J. J. Gottlob Manager 

Matinee To-Day at 2. Last Nights. Continued Success of 



GUS WILLIAMS 
AND 

JOHN T. KELLY, 



"U & I" 



Monday, January 12— Miss Adelaide Moobe in ROMEO and JULIET. 
One Week Only. Seats Now Keady. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Proprietors and Managers 

To-Night! A Success! Well, I Wonder! The Greatest Number of People 
and Most Money ever in this House! 

THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 

First Appearance of Prof. H. Leon, the Hungarian Hercules. 
Popular Prices 26c. and 50c. 

THE OLYMPIAN CLUB ROLLER SKATING RINK, 

(Entire Mechanics' Pavilion), 

5,000 pairs of the Latest Roller Skates. 60,000 square feet of New Maple 
Surface. 

Afternoon and Evenings. Saturday Night, Grand Amateur Races. Skating 
Morning and Afternoon. Tall Hat Party Postponed. 

The Most Novel and Interesting Entertainment. 

Tuesday Night, January 13th— Suowden vs. Delmoat, one mile, for $500 a 
side and the Short Distance Championship of America. 

THE CALIFORNIA. 

Strictly European Plan. Absolutely Fire-proof. 

' OPENED DECEMBER 1, 1890, 

The only hotel in San Francisco that has sun in rooms entire day. This 
is the only strictly first-class hotel in the city. Magnificent appointments. 
Unparalleled in beauty and brilliancy. Unquestionably the most beautful 
and luxuriously furnished hotel in America. Rooms en suite with baths 
of latest exposed sanitary plumbing. Electric lights throughout. Every 
convenience for comfort of guests. Most centrally located, being in the 
midst of amusements, art galleries, shops and other places of interest. 

Its cuisine is of a peculiar excellence. The best and handsomest Res- 
taurant in the city. Service perfect. Half portions served. 

Rooms $1 per day and upwards. 

HORD & KINZLER, Managers. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 



The Winter Term of this School will open on MONDAY, January 5th. 
INSTRUCTORS: 
R. D. Yelland, Arthur F. Mathews, Oscar Kunath, Amadee Joullin, 
and Lee Lash. 
TERMS.— Regular Classes: Drawing, $10 per month, $24 per term; Oil 
Painting, $12 per month, $30 per term. Saturday Class, $4 per mouth or $12 
for four months. 
For particulars, inquire at the School, 430 Pine street. 

J. R. MARTIN, Assistant Secretary. 

DRY MONOPOLE Extra, and 
MONOPOLE Club Dry (Brut) 

CHAMPAGNE'S. 
HEIDSIECK & CO., Reims. 

Established 1786. 



H. H. VEUVE, Pacific Coast Agent, 

124 SANSOME STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 




THE £,rand scheme of the irrepressible Stokes for an "exclusive" 
California "Tuxedo," as set forth in a morning contemporary, 
is highly amusing to those who have ever visited the charming 
place of that name, in New York, and know anything of its 
modus operandi. It will be a long day off before we have a 
"Tuxedo" as beautiful, wealthy and exclusive as that, and when 
we are so fortunate as to possess one resort that is only accessible 
to people of culture and position, it will not owe its existence to 
such a one as Mr. James Brett-Stokes, nor indeed to any one at 
prresent endeavoring to regulate our society. It is a great pity that 
matters socially have to be left to our nouveau riche, whose ances- 
tors were either "butchers, bakers, wool-pickers and candle-stick 
makers," instead of being in the hands of our really best and 
nice people. Once on a time among our social leaders, whose en- 
tertainments were always exclusive, we counted Mrs. Colton, 
Mrs. Tevis, Thornton, McAllister, and a few others, all ladies by 
birth and breeding. Now we are patronized in many instances 
by people who would never be received anywhere else in this 
wide world as worthy of social recognition. Men, too, who are 
not gentlemen, have far too much authority in our society mat- 
ters, men whose hafcits are too low for expression, who are of no 
family whatever, some with not even an atom of honor, and 
others who are suspected of all sorts of things, even to cheating 
at cards — are, simply because of the little money and influence 
they possess, received in our best society. When out Ward Mc- 
Allister is making up our social list let him open his eyes a trifle 
wider, and his discriminating faculties also, for it would be un- 
kind and rank injustice for any one to say that invitations both 
to private and semi-private entertainments were bought and sold. 

* *■ # 

And so we are to become still greater Anglomaniacs and have' 
" house boats," such as one sees so often on the Thames in the 
summer season. And where, pray, are these " house-boats " to 
run? In our bay or the Pacific Ocean? How very unique a line 
of them would look skirting the beach by the Cliff House; but, 
begad, we have a few rivers after all. There are the San Joaquin 
and Sacramento and Napa rivers; yes, our dudes might take their 
choice of them. But house-boats at Sausalito. where, according 
to our morning contemporary, the reliable Monarch, Tobin and 
Stokes and others of the Peerage are contemplating summer resi- 
dence, etc., seems like stretching a point. Those who have really 
lived for a month or two in a "hoase-boat" on old England's 
lovely Thames, with the trees on its banks casting their shadows 
into the blue water below, and the lawns of- the parks of innum- 
erable country seats running down to tbe water's edge, with the 
gay crowd, the luxurious living room and gardened deck, where 
one may lie off in a hammock and smoke, together with the best 
in the world to eat and drink — will never find any resemblance 
to those good times when he takes his first or last trip in the 
" houseboat " of my Lord Tobin or his Grace, the Earl of Stokes, 
off the Sausalito coast, or even elsewhere. 

• * * 

It is certainly a matter of grievance which ought to be com- 
mented upon for the girls' benefit. A matron, who is well on in 
years, should be content to take a back seat, so to speak, and 
give her junior3 a chance. Unfortunately, it has happened fre- 
quently in our best society that the opportunity to enjoy society 
pleasures has only come to the aforesaid matron late in life, and 
therefore she means to take all she can, and she takes it. 

• # # 

So the handsome Baron von Schroeder is about to leave our 
Golden West to reside permanently in his foreign home. That le 
Baron will be sadly missed, goes without saying, for his graceful 
Adonis-like form has long been admired by both old and young, 
good and bad, in his daily promenades, more especially on Satur- 
day afternoons, when, with eye-glasses upon his aristocratic Ger- 
man nose and gardenite in his button-hole, he is the cynosure of 
all eyes. No one will miss the Baron more than his friend Veuve, 
his almost constant companion in these d*ily strolls, but "Veuve 
will console himself in a great measure in the arms of his little dar- 
ling, adoring Danny Murphy; pity it is that pretty Dan is not a 
woman, so that these two enamored ones could marry and be 
done with it. 

* # * 

Speaking of club men and wine merchants, brings to mind the 
"Stout, amiable and handsome " Dexter, whom, they say, has 
now, under the influence of "Mrs. John Knox," entirely re- 
formed, and become an " earnest worker in the vineyard of 

not th« Lord — but of La Cantera." To judge from his appear- 
ance, one would imagine he was "working the growler" as 
well. A good story is told of this gentleman on the occasion of 
his last recent visit to town. It seems that the Grand Hotel has 
usually been his abiding place on these occasions, but owing to 
the recent fire, " stout and amiable " decided upon trying another 
hostelry. Next day he got in with " the boys," and they made a 



day of it, " sampling" wines, etci By evening a beautiful jag 
for the crowd was thecesult, when they all insisted upon escort- 
ing this stray lamb to his fold, and straightway made for the 
Grand Hotel. At length, when room No. — was reached, the key 
would not fit the door, and " stout and amiable " shouted to his 
better half to '« open the door," whereupon a night-capped head, 
with the front locks done up in curl papers, was thrust forth, 
and a shrill voice demanded the cause of " all this noise." "I 
want to go to bed," mumbled a jagged voice. " Sakes alive! not 
here," shrieked the spinster. At this point the night watch- 
man came to her rescue, and it was then discovered that the 
" handsome ex-wine merchant " bad made a mistake in his hotel. 
The boys say that he has been trying to find the owner of that 
small, shrill voice ever since. 

# # * 

It must be most discouraging to our recently transplanted bud 
— Mrs. Herman Oelrichs, n?e Pair — to see the account of the 
wholesale slaughter of her family heirlooms at the hands of reck- 
less servants, detailed in all the "leading society journals " of 
New "York. How unfortunate it is to be prominent. "Heavy 
is the head that wears the crown," they say, and heavier still 
must be the heart when it contemplates the ruin of old china and 
the like, that has been handed down for generations. 
# # #■ 

At the last Friday Night Cotillion it was my good fortune to 
have for my partner in the giddy maze one of San Francisco's 
brightest girls. Her eyes sparkled with fun, and her tongue 
followed suit, albeit in the latter instance the " unruly member " 
was a trifle tinged with sauce piquante. " Look at that couple," 
said she, as a pair whirled past us, " does it not recall to your 
mind that the race is not always for the swift nor the battle for 
the — long. Wilt see?" and I wilted. 

U Y Jos. Tetley & Co.'s '« Elephant " brand of Ceylon and In- 
dia Teas in lead packets. Unadulterated, fragrant, delicious. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co. , Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 

Japanese Silk Dressing Gowns at Marsh's, under Palace Hotel. 

C. MAREY & LIGER BELAIR'S 

NUITS, 

BURGUNDY WINES. 



B 



Chambertin, 
Beaune, 



Clos-Vougeot, 
Pommard, 

In Cases, Quarts and Pints. 



Chablis (White). 
(••) 1878. 



G. M. PABSTMANN SOHIN, 

MAINZ & HOCHHEIM. 

RHINE WINES, 

«. M. PABSTMANN SO!I>, MAYKXCE- 

Geisenheimer Hochbeimer (own growth) 

Marcobrunner Steinwein (Boxbeutel) 

Liebfraumilch Johannisberger, Schloss 

Ruedesheimer Steinberger, Cabinet 

AND 

KOENIGIN VICTORIA BERG, Bronze Label. 

CHARLES MEINECKE &. CO., 

Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento St reet, S. F. 

MME. B. ZISKA, A. M., 

(Recently Principal of Zeitska Institute) 
1G06 California Street, 
coutinues to receive a limited number of pupils, who wish to receive pri- 
vate instruction under her special direction. Four youug ladies admitted 
as resident students. French, German, English and all the branches of a 
complete education. 

Seven Sutherland Sisters' f 

SCALP CLEANER 

Is the only Dandruff Cure. For f 
Shampooing it has no equal. 

Prices — Hair Grower, $1. Sis 
bottles for $5. Scalp Cleaner, 50c. 

For sale by the Seven Suther- 
land Sisters and all Druggists. 

Seven Sutherland Sisters, Sole 
Manufacturers and Proprietors, 
836 Market St. ,San FrancisC"-, Cal. 

Main Office, IS West Fourteenth- 
street, New York. 

No charge io see the Seven Sutherland Sisters. Consultation free. 




Jan. 10, 



BAN it; INGI8C0 NEWS LETTER, 



THE RAILROADS. 

J "INT ownership U Mr C P. Honttnfton'i bold remedy f..r 
railway win, He la quoted M Mjinjt ihm the plan of lb« 
new agreement of President i« in Ihe right (Unction, bal -I 
go far enough, ami that h« pro a Id luv« it go •' Lo Ul* point of 
joint ownership. " Ail<lin»; : ■• I WOO Id like to hiivr a llogtfl com- 
pany operate all of Ihl railroads. Then, instead of n lot of war 
ring, atjf-daftroylng element*, ere would hnve a homogeneous 
and prosperous body. I don't mean a trust ..r anything like 
(bat, but a concentration of ownership of railroad properties. Fur 
instance, there are thirty different railroads in the 8outtaem Pa- 
cific system. The stork of each one is owtud by the Southern 
Company. Now, suppose we go :i step higher, and put 
all the big roads in the hands of one corporation. \\V would then 
pnt a ttop to rate-cutting, ruinous competition and many useless 
expenditures. The money that now goes for special commissions, 
drawbacks, rebates and for salaries for unnecessary agents would 
be saved to the shareholders. Joint ownership of all the railroads 
is the very thing that will make uniformity of rates absolutely 
certain.*' 

The Railway Reviews says: The recent meeting of the railway 
presidents was not wholly dressed in sombre colors. Mr. Stick- 
ney, of the Chicago. St. Paul & Kansas City road in objecting to 
the proposed resolutions said: "Two years ago you formulated 
something similar and it was a failure. Railroad men are not 
built in such a way that they will abide by this contract. Yoa 
are all gentlemen here, and in your private capacity as such I 
would trust any of you with my watch, and would believe the 
word of any of you, but in your capacity as railroad presi- 
dents I wouid not believe one of you on oath, and I would not 
trust one of you with my watch." Just here and replying to Mr. 
Stickney's remarks Mr. (iould told a story. He said: "Daniel 
Drew- once went into a tabernacle where sinners were confessing 
their crimes. There was one man thumping his chest and accus- 
ing himself of so many awful offenses that Drew became horri- 
fied. Turning to the man next to him beinquired: 'My friend,' 
who is this man who has done these awful things?" 'I don't 
know who he is,' the stranger said to Drew, 'but I guess from his 
account of himself he must be Daniel Drew.' " 

Application is being made to the Legislature of British Colum- 
bia for an act incorporating the Vancouver, Northern & Alaska 
Co. to construct and maintain a line of railway and a telegraph 
line, from the city of Vancouver, or some other point on the 
south side of Burrard Inlet, or the banks of the Fraser river, 
by way of Seymour Creek Valley, the Pemberton Meadows, the 
Chilcoten Plains and the headwaters of the Fraser river to a 
point on the Parsnip or Peace river, with a branch or branches in 
a northwesterly direction to the Skena and Stickeen rivers to the 
boundary of Alaska. 



The Canadian Pacific R. Co. has filed a notice of application for 
an act to incorporate the Ontario «fc New York Bridge Co., with 
power to construct a bridge for a railway and other purposes 
across the Niagara river at or near Niagara Falls or such other 
point as the company may select, and to amalgamate with any 
company duly incorporated in the United States on equal terms, 
and with power to collect tolls and for other purposes. 

General Manager, George M. Nix, of the Midland Pacific Rail- 
way Company, reports that the road is projected from Pierre, 
Dak., to Puget Sound, a distance of 1,400 miles, and will be a 
part of a continental line. The final survey of the route has 
progressed as far as Minnesella, S. Dak., in the heart of the Black 
Hills. Mr. Nix says the line is certain to be built, and construc- 
tion will begin next summer. 



Within the next thirty days most of the passenger associations 
will' act on the question of abolishing the sale of unlimited 
tickets. When this is done, if a person wishes to stop at points 
between termini be will purchase a local ticket. The ticket 
scalpers fear this action more than any other which has been 
proposed by the General passenger agents. 

The November report of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 
Railroad Company, including the Burlington and Missouri River 
railroads in Nebraska and the controlled roads, shows gross 
earnings, $2,872,680; decrease, $94,897; operating expenses, $1,- 
816,659; decrease, $57,262; net earnings, $294,132; decrease, 
$55,138. 



The engine mileage on the Southern Pacific fcTr the month of 
November was 703,000,000 miles, against 615,000,000 miles for 
the same month last year. The car mileage for November this 
year was 10,427,273 miles, against 8,945,347 miles for November, 
1890. 




W. G. Badger, sole agent for Hallet, Davis & Co., W. W. Kimball 
& Co., celebrated pianos and organs, removed to History Building, 
725 Market street, ground floor. 




Macintoshed Coats! 

ANN- 

CLOAKS 

FOB I.AHIKS AND (iKNl'l.KMKN. 

gooombTubbeii CO 

K. II. PEASE, Jr.,; .„..,„ 

557 and 559 Market Street, San Francisco. 

HIGHLAND BRAND MILKl 

the oisriiir 

Absolutely Pure Condensed Milk in the Market 

A PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOR 

FRESH MILK OR CREAM. 

THE BEST KNOWN FOOD FOR INFANTS. 

It contains no sugar or chemicals, but is simply pure cow's milk, 
and can be used the same as fresh milk for every purpose. 

For sale by all grocers and druggists. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., Sole Agents, 

SA FRANCISCO. 

ART NOVELTIES ! 

For tasty Wedding-presents and select Christ- 
mas Gifts, call and inspect Gump's new import- 
ations of Foreign and American Artists'-proof 
Etchings, Water - colors and Goupil's latest 
Novelties. Also a various selection of imported 
Wares, as Crown Derby, Carlsbad Sevres, Royal 
Dresden, Royal Worcester, Hungarian, etc. 
Brass Cabinets, Easels, and various kinds of 
Foreign Art Furniture. OPEN EVENINGS. 

GUMP'S COLLECTION OF FOREIGN OIL PAINTINGS now 
on Exhibition in our Gallery. 

S. & G. GUMP, 

Nos. 581-583 Market Street. 
GO TO 

Gk "W. CLARK <Sc CO., 
663 Market Street, 

FOE 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 
And CORNICE POLES. 

Ruinart Pere & Fils 

CIEI^II^IF^GrlsriE. 

VIN BRUT, 1884. 




Donald De V. Graham, Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast 



124 SANSOME STREET, S. V. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 




PUGILISTIC. — By this time next Saturday we will have received 
the full account of the great battle between Jack Dempsey 
and Robert Fitzsimmons for the middle-weight championship of 
the world and $10,000, the largest purse ever hung up in this or 
any other country. The two pugilists are busily engaged at pres- 
ent getting into condition at their respective quarters, Dempsey 
at Galveston and Fitzsiramons at New Orleans. 

The entire sporting world is waiting with anxiety for every bit 
of news regarding these men, who may safely be regarded as the 
two cleverest men who have as yet met in any ring. They are 
each 28 years of age, the Australian being a few months only the 
senior of the Nonpareil. The latter has fought nearly every 
fighter of his class, defeating them all to the number of over fifty. 
Nearly every battle, too, he gave away weight, and against odds 
that seemed overwhelming he came out victorious. But once was 
he defeated, that was when he met La Blanche at the California 
Athletic Club in this city some months ago. He had beaten the 
" Marine" once before and this time he was in a fair way of doing 
so again when a "fluke" blow cut him short in his victorious ca- 
reer. In his many battles Dempsey has shown himself to be a 
great general, whose main idea was not to whip a man quickly, 
but surely. He never essayed as a general thing to knock his op- 
ponent out t but rather affected to chop him to pieces, while he, 
himself, kept out of harms way. That all goes under the head 
of generalship, however. 

Now about Fitzsimmons. He does not know what dissipation 
is. He has never indulged in liquors nor smoked a cigar. His 
life, up to the last couple of years, has been one of hard work at 
the forge. He is blessed with a phenomenally long reach, and is 
six feet in height. He has the limbs of a thoroughbred horse — 
slight, but muscular, allowing him wonderful activity for a man 
with a heavy-weight's bust. The very slight distance from his 
lower ribs to his hip bones is the best indication of endurance, and 
that is corroborated by the continuous strain be undergoes with- 
out flinching when doing a mile in five minutes. 

Both men have fought the same man, and Fitzsimmons won in 
the best time. This, however, may not be a criterion, as Dempsey 
is proverbially generous with his victims, leaving them to stay 
awake beyond their just right. 

Dempsey is selling favorite here, as well as in New York and 
New Orleans, although no odds should be given, excepting, per- 
haps, the other way. 

Last Wednesday four directors of the California Athletic Club 
left here on a special train bound for New Orleans, where they ex- 
pect to arrive in time to see the battle. They are W. R. Vice, J. 
Gibbs, John Ferguson and Dr. Leek. A couple or three weeks 
ago Major Frank McLaughlin left this coast on a visit to bis family 
in the East, and he, too, will be at the ring side. That will make 
a graceful representation for California in the home of the New 
Orleans Club. 

The match between Peter Jackson and Jim Corbett is the next 
one on the tapis here to settle heavy-weight claims. True enough, 
there seems to be some hitch between Corbett and his father, who 
has declared he will not allow his son to disgrace his family. 
Just how Mr. Corbett pere has arrived at such a conclusion is dif- 
ficult to say. For years he has been the greatest admirer of his 
son's prowess and has encouraged him at every step. Since Jim quit 
the Anglo-Nevada Assurance Co., where he was a clerk, refusing to 
listen to the Directors' dictum that he should not box, even in the 
Olympic Club ring, he has been earning a living by giving boxing 
lessons. Later he fought Joe Choynski, and no one was prouder of 
this feat than his father. The old gentleman can be remembered 
to this day, when the tug-boat docked with the victorious boy, 
jumping from the wharf to the deck, a distance of perilous mag- 
nitude, to congratulate his son. He subsequently gave Jim and 
his pugilistic friends a reception. Time sped on, and Jim went to 
New Orleans, where he defeated Jake Kilrain in a boxing contest. 
Mr. Corbett phe went nearly wild at the result, and when there 
was a talk and many publications to the eiject that Jim Corbett 
should meet John L. Sullivan next, the Governor-elect of this 
State could not show up a prouder expanse of chest than that of 
Jim's father. 

Of course the old gentleman is proud of his boy's achievements, 
and he has every right to be so. There is not another boy known 
in the universe with the gentility of Jim's rearing and sphere of 
life, who can show such fistic ability as he has. It would be a 
positive shame to forbid his taking advantage of his possibilities. 
Should he be successful with Jafikson, and use good business 
judgment, Jim can certainly accumulate, in a year or two, enough 
money to retire from the ring and be classed among the very 
wealthy, before taking any more chances. Should he meet with 
defeat, a result his many friends do not contemplate, he may go 
on as he has heretofore, as the clever instructor of boxing, or else 
he can retire entirely into a new groove. 

Young Mitchell and La Blanche are matched to box for a good 
sized compensation before the California Athletic Club next 



month. That is going to be a magnificent set-to. It has been the 
desire of every Califorman to see Mitchell come against a first- 
rate pugilist. La Blanche was once whipped by Dempsey and 
the next time he whipped his former victor. Young Mitchell 
was born and raised here. His battles have been almost against 
all comers, and he has yet to be defeated. Should he defeat La 
Blanche he will be in a position to command the attention of 
such pugilists as Fitzsimmons, Dempsey and Pritchard. 

ATHLETIC— The Olympic Club Directors have settled on the 
programme for field day, February 22d. It will be a 120-yard 
run, open to all; 220-yard run, for the club members only; 440- 
yard run, open; half-mile run, open; two-mile run, open; one- 
mile walk, open; pole vault for distance, club; putting 16-pound 
shot, club; standing long jump, club; 120-yard hurdle, open; 
220-yard hurdle, open; throwing 56-pound weight, club; running 
high jump, club. 

It has also been decided that henceforth the wrestlers on 
"Ladies' Night" will wear trunks only instead of the cumber- 
some tights which have always been discarded before ladies 
were permitted to witness wrestling bouts. This has been at 
the request of the ladies themselves. They have properly de- 
cided that there is nothing improper in such a proceeding. 

YACHTING. — While there is very little doing in these wavers, 
the Eastern yachtsmen are being kept busy thinking, if noth- 
ing more. Lieutenant Henn arrived in New York and he is au- 
thorized to seek some arrangement with the N. Y. Yacht Club by 
which the America's Cup may be raced for this year. Of course 
it is the dimension clause in the deed of gift that makes the 
hitch. If this can be waived in some way there is bound to be a 
match. 

If nothing takes place in this way, it is probable the N. Y. 
Yacht Club will go to England with some crack yacht and race 
for the Royal Yacht Squadron Cup. 

SKATING. — Snowden won the 24-hour skating race at the 
Pavilion one week ago last night. He beat his own 275J- 
iuile record and gained the world's by making 295 miles. On 
Tuesday night next Snowden and Frank Delmont will skate one 
mile for $500 a side at the Olympian rink. 



WENDELL EASTON. 



GEO. W. FEISK. 



F. B. WILDE. 



?EAL ESTATE MEHTh*i 

§KmkkcTimiM 



FINE ART AT AUCTION 

THUKSDAY, JAN. 15, 1891, AT 2 O'CLOCK P. M. 

IN IRVING HALL, 
POST ST., BETWEEN KEARNY AND GRANT AVE, 



A CHOICE COLLECTION OP 



OIL PAINTINGS. 



From the brush of HENRY ALEXANDER, 

a California-born young man, student for ten years under Benchur, 
Loefftz and Lindenschmidt of Munich, and exhibitor in the Art 
Salon, Munich, 1879 (picture purchased by the Salon Committee); 
also, exhibitor in the National Academy of Designs and Ameri- 
can Art Galleries in New York City. This offering of his works 
at auction is his first presentation to a San Francisco public, and 
all lovers and connoisseurs of art should obtain at least one of his 
pictures to grace their collection. 

The pictures will be upon exhibition at Irving Hall on Tues- 
day afternoon and evening, January 13th, all day Wednesday and 
during the evening, January 14th, also on Thursday, January 
loth, up to the hour of the auction sale, at 2 o'clock afternoon. 
Catalogues at Irving Hall and at our office. 

EASTON, ELDRIDGE & CO., 

AUCTIONEERS. 



Jan. 10. 



BAN Kl: INCIft O NEWS 1 KTTER 



11 



SHOTS FROM THE MITRAILLEUSE. 

i um.iry 10, 1" 'I 

THERE i« a gossipy old ■■prenati.er" who live? in an K<My street 
tlat with bar daughter ul ;\* tall as the 

■itt In barling stones from her 
kI»«« residence el people who here been m onktnd u t" bike no 
notice of her. She is a woman with a history, of as lowly 
birth as the "littlr milkmaid" we read of in the nonary rhymes. 
At an early age she "caught on" to a Virginian, ■ genuine Booth 
em gentleman; who. enchanted with hat beauty, married heracd 
took her to bis mountain home. Sin. e then she has QgOli 
(•naively on both continents, both in her financial transactions 
ami her social maneuvering. ■• hut as the way of the transgressor 
is hard." Lady Thlstleburgh tin. In herself to-day '-reaping the 
whirlwind, " with ii" one to blame but herself. In London she 
was, "many years ago," a great beauty, and her manners (ac- 
quired by much practice] were perfect. Bhe placed her daughter 
under cultivated tutelage and enjoyed the advantages thus af- 
forded herself. She learned to write the big English hand and to 
modulate her voice in speaking in truly aristocratic fashion — all 
this together with youth, beauty and wealth, and the fact of her 
being married to a gentleman, proved advantageous to her schem- 
ing? in many ways, but all her maneuverings to mingle with the 
nobility were futile, also her effort to have "darling daughter" 
presented at Court. She could not work it — her extravagances 
were appalling and many were the unfortunates who suffered loss 
by their too friendly yielding to her borrowing propensities. 
There was a house on the Coast of Africa and one in Swortman's 
Square, London, and another in America, all being maintained in 
the most fairy-life manner. She boasted of the love of number- 
less men, among them a gallant Captain, a swave bank president, 
capitalists galore and no end of others. And now, the end has 
come, more than one victim of her unprincipled doings has gone 
to his last sleep — she spoiled the life of her daughter, and she her- 
self lives to see her splendid air castles demolished, her true char- 
acter revealed, and her only associates the few who, possessing 
little or no brains of their own, yield easily to the influence of 
this woman, whose large experience has rendered it easy for her 
to delude the weak, natures of vain men. 
» # » 

The girls are going into raptures at the intelligence that young 
Mackay is about to make his appearance on the Coast. Walter 
Dean's light has paled before the luminous son of Bonanza. It 
is to be hoped that the older girls, and above all the frisky 
matrons, will let the young man alone, and give the fresh young 
buds a chance to get in some work. 
» # # 

As it stands at present, the married flirt takes pre-eminence in 
a ballroom. They are chosen to lead cotillions and fill the dance 
programme of the favorite beaux, and all the while the pretty deb- 
utante sits in silent wonder why this should be thus, or else is com- 
pelled to accept the attentions of the lank hobbledehoy or the bore. 
Another class of matrons who are antagonistic to a girl's hap- 
piness, are those whose wealth and position enable them to lay 
claim to the attention of the young men who make society life a 
business. Of course the men's excuse is that the givers of ex- 
quisite dinners, and invitations to opera boxes, petites soupers, etc., 
are not to be neglected. 

# • » 

One of the rapidly ageing dames, whose daughter would do 
more credit to the cotillion than herself, hails from the rural dis- 
tricts; while another, whose locks are beginning to show the 
frosty finger of Time, is remarkable for her predilection for light- 
tinted toilettes. Why cannot these ladies, both of whom are hap' 
pily married, be content to shine in the domestic circle, and 
leave the sway of the ballroom to the young girls? 
» # # 

The girls all say that it is just too lovely to sit in a dentist's 
window, and watch the naughty boys of the club keeping their 
appointments with their inamoratas in the Squarel 

# # * 

New York Anglo-maniacs are crazy with delight. Actually in 
Christmas week they had a real London fog, enveloping the city 
to such an extent one could easily fancy himself in the neighbor- 
hood of the " Thames, don't you know." 

# # # 

The number of New Yorkers who are passing the winter in our 
swim has been augmented by the arrival of a somewhat used up 
specimen of the languid swell. How our Native Sons tolerate 
such patronizing airs as this man gives himself, is a matter of as- 
tonishment to those who look on. To be sure the majority of our 
local beaux of native birth are yet in the stage of adolescence 
and they are possibly impressed by the superior knowledge of 
the world and "wimnien, by Jove," assumed by this Gothamite. 

# # # 

Pretty Miss Kate informed me at a tea the other day, that a 
very swell cotillion is to be given by Mrs. Will Crocker; and as it 
has been whispered around that the favors for it were chosen by 
the hostess herself in Paris, the girls are all in a fever of curiosity 



unique 



the men are said to be something eery 
■f « hlcfa have oavar yal been seen 01 



It Ll really amusing though tint in-trm live to the Callfomlans 
at home to re.nl the reliable new - of them :iml their doings, given 

the public weekly by the -New York correspondents" of the dally 
Sot long since th« News Lutes, called attention to the 
glaring sbsurditfi - presented each week in the letters 

from Harry B. McDowell, but he 100 ms to have found a rival in 
Verdinal'a Bund ay letter to the Chronicle, who In his laal one In 
forms us thai bi Butlfal Mamie Coghlll in Mrs, Hemphill (her own 
mother) and thai Henry J an In and B. .1. de Santa Marina 
married sisters. This will be news indeed to San Franciscans. 

Golden Gate Kindergarten Association. 

We have received from the President of the Golden Gate Kin- 
dergarten Association the eleventh Annual Report for the year 
ending 6th i Ictober, 1890. It shows that great good has been accom- 
plished bj the Association during eleven years of faithful work 
among the needy children of San Francisco, and it is hardly pos- 
sible to estimate the bearing of Huh Free Kindergarten upon the 
future of thisgreal and growing city. The Report shows that the 
past year has been by far the most successful of all previous ones, 
and that the work has made wonderful progress. The total annual 
enrollment is over L\nOO, the children varying from eighteen months 
to six years of age. We strongly urge upon all those interested in 
the future welfare of San Francisco, which all good citizens should 
be, to peruse carefully this Keport, and we feel confident that it will 
induce all who have it in their power to aid the ladies who are en- 
gaged in this noble work. 

ST. MATTHEWS' HALL, 

S-A-£T MATEO, C-A.I-1. 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS! 



Twenty-fifth Year. Easter Term commences Thursday, January 8, 1891. 



REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Rector. 



TYLER HALL. 



Preparatory Department of St. Matthew's Hall, San Mateo, California, 
FOR YOUNG BOYS. 



Easter Session will commence THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 1891. 
For catalogues and full information address 

REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Rector. 



Government Lands Located without Settlement or Residence. 



Anypartof FIVE THOUSAND (5000) ACRES OP SCRIP FOR SALE, which 
cau be located upon any unoccupied Governmeut Laud, 

SURVEYED OR UNSURVEYED, IN CALIFORNIA, 

lu Tracts of Forty Acres and upwards. 

TITLES TO SUSPENDED ENTRIES can also he obtained. 

Address 

W. E. DARGIE, 

Tribune Office, Oakland, Cal, 
Or, McAFEE. BALDWIN* HAMMOND, 10 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Miss Ellen Coubsbn. Mr. Joseph Roeckel. 

VOCAL COITSEEVATOBT. 

320 POST STREET. 
Private Lesson** and Classes Resumed. 




Hammond Typewriter, 



WITH 

Ideal and Universal 

KEV-llOAKD. 

^^" See the New Universal. 

Supplies aud Repairs for all Machines. 
SCOTT & BANNAN, 213 Sansome Street, S. E. 




12 



SAT* FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



A LOR MAIRE SHOW. 

I HAD known Anastase Lepetit for some years. He was the 
most prominent man of the most prominent town in the least 
prominent part of France; and, whenever I rusticated in that 
neighborhood, my friend Lepetit showed me every civility. He 
was ready a man of importance; he was a maire of considerable 
popularity, some of which was due to his general good nature, 
and some to his reputation as " child of the country." He had 
been born in Aladon ; he had made his money in Aladon ; he spent 
his money in Aladon; his visits to Paris he could count on the 
fingers of one hand; and he had never been outside of France. 

I had often urged him to visit England, which he looked upon 
with the mingled curiosity and contempt with which we regard 
the moon. He was full of all the legends with regard to this 
country which have been current in France for two centuries; 
and he thought of la Manche as Columbus might have thought of 
the Atlantic Ocean. My offers of hospitality had no attraction 
for a man who would make a journey into the next department 
with more solemnity than many a man prepares for death. But, 
one year, as I was taking my autumnal ramble near Aladon, I 
found M. Lepetit much more curious about foreign parts, and 
much more amenable to the notion of foreign travel. He was 
then maire for the fourth time, and was full of the dignity of the 
office. But he had become bitten with jealousy of a greater rival. 
He said more thanj>nce, in the thoughtful moments of an even- 
ing, " Ce Lor Maire de Londres — je voudrais bien le voir." 

Nothing easier, I explained. He had only to pay me a visit — 
and why not next month? Next month the new Lord Mayor 
would come into office and he would see a Lord Mayor's Show — 
a spectacle (here I romanced a little) which was one of the most 
brilliant, the most select, the most imposing. I had a house at 
his pleasure; I had windows commanding the route at his dis- 
posal; he had only to come — would he? He would. In three 
weeks' time he would be with me. 

Many things may happen in three weeks, and among other 
things an illness. Upon my return to England a sharp attack of 
rheumatism laid me up at a friend's house in the country. I was 
unable to welcome M. Lepetit upon his first arrival in London ; so 
I did what I thought was the next best thing — I put him into the 
hands of Jack Rambler, an amusing fellow, full of humor and 
story, and one who I felt would give any friend of mine a good 
time, I asked Jack to make the necessary arrangements for the 
Show, and promised Anastase to join him as soon as I could — in 
time for the great event, if I could possibly manage it. 

The 9th of November that year fell on a Sunday, and the usual 
ceremonies were postponed to Monday. M. Lepetit was to arrive 
on Friday, and arrive be did, in the usual state of collapse which 
a first Channel voyage in November is apt to produce. From the 
moment that he arrived at Charing Cross Rambler took him in 
tow, and I am answerable for nothing that followed. I did, how- 
ever, succeed in getting up to town on Sunday night, and I only 
know what M. Lepetit was able to tell me of the great sight 
which he had witnessed on the previous day. 

Your friend, M. Ramblerre (said he), he conduct me to an ap- 
partcmtnt upon Oxford Street, when he made me present to a num- 
ber of his friends, both gentleman and lady. The day was dull, 
but not so the party, for we enjoyed a dejeuner of the best, with 
much wine of Champagne. And, ma foi, but we drank and 
laughed; and the ladies took their part bravely. I had made to 
myself quite another idea of the English ladies. C'6tait peut- 
etre des Anmricaines. On dit que c'est moins raide, le type 
Americain. Figure to yourself, however, my astonishment to 
see the street so dull and quiet — not a decoration, not a flag. I 
demand why. M. Ramblerre he answer me that the Lor Maire 
have just lost his mother-in-law — une dame excellente a ce qu'il 
parait — and that the people of London much sympathize with 
his grief. You will remark, he said to me, bow all the world 
wears the black coat and the hat of form in sign of mourning. 
Wetait vrai, I took occasion to note in my memoranda the noble 
sensibility of the English people. 

It was towards three o'clock when we first hear the sound of 
music. '*Here they are!" cry the ladies, showing themselves 
more and more gay. M. Ramblerre alone he conserve a grave 
face. He take me aside and explain — "She was parent of mine, 
the mother-in-law of the Lor Maire. She was my deceased wife's 
sister. J'avais merae voulu l'epouser. The Prince de Galles was 
for me, but the bishops opposed resolutely. I had to yield, IXelas!" 
I pressed his hand in sympathy. Evidently, a most distinguished 
man, your friend, M. Ramblerre. 

He then take me to the window, and there are now many peo- 
ple in the street. One could see the procession approach, a long 
line of banners marking the route. In head a band of police offi- 
cers, then a music which played distractingly badly, and then a 
crowd of marching people, men and women mixed. The men 
for the most part were in scarlet tunic, and the women 
with black bonnets, the ugliest that one can see. I de- 
mand of M. Ramblerre the meaning of the letters S. A. 
upon the tunics. He reply to me that it signifies Son Altesse, the 
title of honor of his Highness the Lor Maire, and that it is of 
great antiquity, coming from the days of the Norman-French 



conquest. Then more bands, and more banners with legends 
which I do not well remember, except one, " Through Blood and 
Fire," as to which I inquire of M. Ramblerre the meaning. He 
assure me that this also is of great antiquity, and refers to the 
ancient bifteck Anglais, which is roasted over fire, saignant, and 
eaten every Christmas Day by the beefeaters of her Majesty the 
Queen. 

But I was waiting to see the Lor Maire himself. And presently 
the people began to shout, as a great banner come up with the 
words, " Hold the Fort" — " c'est a dire, la Tour de Londres," 
whisper M. Ramblerre to me, " where inhabits the Lor Maire." 
And then, in a carriage, a tall man with a beard and hook-nose, 
and so I see the English Lor Maire. " He has, then, no robes of 
office 9 " I say to M- Ramblerre. " Pour le moment, non," he re- 
ply to me: "they are just now with his uncle, together with his 
chain of office and the City mace. A hard man, his uncle, that 
will not lend him some money he need except on that condition. 
Le Lor Maire, now, is a most benevolent man, and very liberal to 
his family; so that he is almost always very poor himself. He 
is going to give a million pounds presently to the poor of the 
city." " Tiens! " said I; "he has not the air to be able to give 
away twenty-five millions of francs." " It is all in his hat," re- 
plied M. Ramblerre. " He is a real prestidigitateur. He pass 
round his hat once, twice, thrice, et les voiht, les vingt-cinq mill- 
ions." 

Well, the procession came to an end with a few more sergents de 
ville. " And how do you find it?" asked M. Ramblerre. "Most 
interesting," I hasten to assure him ; " but somewhat triste." 

"C'est h cause du deuil," says M. Ramblerre, gravely. And 
then we all go away. 

* # # # 

On Monday, of course, I took M. Lepetit to see the real Show; 
and now, if any one will bring me face to face with Jack Rambler, 
I shall be obliged. — Globe. 

Impure Blood 

Is the cause of Hoils, Carbuncles, 
Pimples, Eczema, and cutaneous erup- 
tions of all kinds. There can be no per- 
manent cure for these complaints until 
the poison is eliminated from the sys- 
tem. To do this thoroughly, the safest 
and most effective medicine is Ayer's 
Sarsaparilla. Give it atrial. 

" For the past twenty-five years I 
liave sold Ayer's Sarsaparilla. In my 
opinion, the best remedial agencies for 
the cure of all diseases arising from im- 
purities of the blood are contained in 
this medicine." — G. C. Brock, Drug- 
gist, Lowell, Mass. 

"My wife was for a long time a suf- 
ferer from tumors on the neck. Noth- 
ing did her any good until she tried 
Ayer's Sarsaparilla, two bottles of which 
jade a complete cure." — W. S. Martin, 
Burning Springs, W. Va. 

"We have sold Ayers Sarsaparilla 
Here for over thirty years and always 
recommend it when asked to name the 
best blood-purifier." — "W. T. McLean, 
Druggist, Augusta, Ohio. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Price $1; six bottlefl,$5. Worth $5 a bottle. 



The Strath more Apartment House, 

N. W. corner La r kin and Fulton Streets. 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR FAMILIES. 

First class ia every respect. Elevator day and night. First-class Restau- 
rant inthe buildiug. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. HAYWARD, No. 224 Cali- 
fornia Street. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

.A QTTI rETT HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION, 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



Jan. 10, 1891 



B LIS n; LNOI8CO NEWS I 11 HER, 




18 



RED is a pretty wirm color for winter afternoons, ami when a 
•irev tl made of flamc-re<l clolb, dotted otu with black vel- 
vet half-moons, the affect is pleasing. A pretty MyW- i*> to make 
a Print ma o! this material, the ona rida i" be cut In ■ 

coat shape down the whole Bide. -<f the skirt, ami the front slight); 
pleated nmler it on the hip; a small vest of block Bilk and neck- 
hand; a high collar edging the reel of a rouleau of red velvet, 
wound round with narrow black velvet ribbon; a similar rouleau 
on each shoulder; the slightly full sleeves to he honeycomhed with 
narrow black velvet from above the elbow to the wrist, and thus 
made tight-fitting; a very narrow frill to edge the skirt. 

The following dress is striking, and suits a dark-haired wearer; 
it La modeled on the Marie Antoinette style of costume. The ma- 
terial is of rich red velvet, with a frill of broad black lace at the 
foot. A very long fichu of fine black net, edged with a frill of 
fine black lace, which crosses in front, passes under the arms and 
is tied at the back with long ends. The short sleeves, slightly 
full at the shoulders, are finished at the edge with black lace frills. 
A single diamond star fastens the fichu in front, and a black 
feather fan completes the costume. 

An effective cover for an upright piano can be made of one long 
strip of white China silk, with a broad band of plush across the 
bottom. One banded with yellow plush, and with gold frinze on 
the ends, is beautiful in a white and gold music room. A piano 
stool cover of white plush, with four heavy gold tassels, and mono- 
gram embroidered in gold cord, is an addition in keeping with the 
spread. The white and gold cases for pianos are rapidly gaining 
in favor. 

Long wraps of black, dark chocolate brown and blue in its dark- 
est shades are lavishly trimmed with rich passementerie and 
chenille beaded fringe and fur. They are lined with quilted satin 
and quite warm enough for tbe coldest days, and, while jackets 
are neat and stylish, the.Iong wraps are elegant. 



Black lace butterflies, with imitation ruby or turquoise beads 
and gold ones with various gems are sold for millinery purposes, 
showing that the fancy for them as ornaments outlasted tbe brief 
span of a butterfly's existence. Some of these ornaments are large 
enough to form the entire low bodice front. 

The cocque feather boas are still at the height of their popularity, 
and vary in value according to their fullness and the lustre of the 
feathers, those having a tint being considered most desirable, and 
a slight sprinkling of the narrow metallic-tinted feathers of tbe 
peacock is thought to add to their beauty. 

A unique music rack is made of palm leaf fans. The stand can 
be of bamboo or wood, and four fans are fastened on it, one be- 
hind the other, handles up. These can be left plain or unadorned 
with tinsel braid, and the result is a lovely and an odd bit of 
furniture for the music room. 

Velvet muffs have jet or gold and jeweled butterflies perched 
on them, or a cluster of small ostrich tips; one piped and lined 
with pale blue and heavy turquoise and black butterfly, appar- 
ently holding a black feather at one side, was exceedingly chic, 

VWSA 

Stationery has its vagaries as well as gowns, and in fancy sta- 
tionery pale blue paper is popular, with a vague design of small 
swallows flitting over it. Even the boxes in which it is generally 
sold are covered with fancy birds very artistic and tempting. 



Black velvet slippers with paste or imitation gems on the in- 
step, are worn by many fashionable women, with a white silk 
hose, for full evening dress, though, as a rule, the hose match the 
gown. 

Turquoise studs, set round with steel, are fashionable. These 
are sewn on to gold lace, and used on black and cream and pale 
blue teagowns. 

Gray, white, violet and lavender dresses are worn as the light- 
est mourning, and these happen to be the colors now most in vogue. 



The Beau Brummel is the gown of the hour. It dislays the beau- 
ties of shoulder and arm without the slightest offense to modesty. 

Pleated ribbon neckties for the throat are now sold edged with 
jet, turquoise or gold beads. They fasten in front with a bow. 

Novelties in handkerchiefs are those of checked muslin, the 
lines being in pink, red or light, and dark blue. 



GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE! 



SWEEPING REDUCTIONS 



IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. 



Oar Regular Annual Clssnnoo Sale, now in program, aflw.i* an kx 
CEiTIONALLI PAVORABL1 OPPORTUNITY for all who haro any prej 
ent or prospective ueod of C ire have madeadeep ana nu- 

■panns em in prleeathronKboai i ••• n i r ..i .,ur ^n „i i all 

unci winter stock, for the purpose of dlnpoalng of «vorythtng m. eioaely 
a.- poaaiblo, previous t.. our annual Slock taking. 

All arc respectfully Invited to call iluriliR this great sale and luspect the 
Kxlraorillnar) Ha renins nfTVr.-.l, which Include the latest »tyle» and 
novelties In 

Ladies' and Children's Outer Garments, 
Black and Cojored Dress Goods, 
Silks, Velvets, Laces, Gioves, 

Ribbons, Umbrellas, Trimmings, 
Handkerchiefs, Gents' Furnishings, 

Hosiery, Underwear, Corsets, 

Blankets, Flannels, Linens, 

Lace Curtains, etc., etc. 



_ 'Mail orders promptly and carefully executed. Goods delivered free 
in Oakland, Alameda Berkeley and San Rafael. 




Murphy Building, 

MARKET AND JONES STREETS. 

THE BEST O F ALL 

Transformer System of Incandescent Lighting ! 

Oar Apparatus is of the Higliest Efficiency, Median leal ly 
and Electrically. 

National Direct Current Dynamos for Isolated Lighting. Western Electric 
Arc Dynamos and Lamps. Kacine Automatic Engines, Boilers and Oil- 
Burning Outfits. A full line of Electric Lighting Materials and Supplies. 

We are prepared to undertake the construction of Electrical Plants of 
whatever magnitude. Correspondence solicited. 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 
314 Calfornia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WOMAN'S HOSPITAL. 

THE CALIFORNIA WOMAN'S HOSPITAL, 

On Sacramento Street, 

Between Baker and Lyon, is now open for the reception of patients. 

There is a Free Ward, Pay Ward, and Rooms for Private Patients. Pure 

air, good diet, and the best of nursing and medical attendance are bestowed 

on all alike Out patients treated gratuitously. For admission apply at 

Hospital. p 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

127 First Street, 

manufacture 

Boilers, Engines, and ev ery Description o f Machinery & Castings 

SPECIALTIES: 

Hazclton Boilers, Wlieelock Automatic Cut-off Engines, 

Duncan Concentrators, Baker Horse rower. 

Iea P. Rankin, President. Willis G. Dodd, Vice-Pres't and Manager. 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., 

2ML IE XI O XX -A. 1ST T T-fiL. I Xj O E. S, 

622 Market Street, upstairs, opposite Palace Hotel, 

8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Many Novelties In Imported Wear. Shirts to Order a Specialty 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 




NOW that the Legislature is again in session the appropriation 
ior the support of the Mining Bureau during the next two 
years is not likely to be overlooked. The sum provided at the 
last term has been widely and judiciously expended under the 
Irelan administration to the material benefit of every one con- 
nected with the mining industry of the State. While consider- 
able attention has been given towards the investigation of new 
developments, the most competent men have been employed in 
field work, which has covered all the old districts in the different 
counties, and furnished reliable data for the guidance of miners 
in the development of their properties. There is a wide scope 
for utilizing the department in this direction. So far little atten- 
tion has been paid to the peculiarities of geological formation 
which exists throughout the several counties, only a limited 
knowledge thereof having been gained in the past from the ob- 
servations and notes of local prospectors. To make a thorough 
investigation of such an important subject, requires time and 
money. This should be taken into consideration whenever the 
bill comes up for approval, and no niggardly views should be en- 
tertained on the subject. It is unnecessary to argue the monetary 
importance of the mining industry in California. It has been 
kept too much in the background as it is, and every thing which 
may tend towards its development in the future should be fos- 
tered. The coming year promises well for the prosperity of this 
branch of our resources, and the tendency towards more activity 
.in the business is worthy of encouragement. 
? I $ 

MINING stocks have been dull as usual of late, with a firmer 
feeling towards the close of the week in the north end and mid- 
dle shares. There have been some strange stories going the rounds 
lately about Con. Cal. Virginia, and for once it can be said there is 
a shadow of truth in the background. The mystery sur- 
rounding the visit of an old foreman of the mine to the wealthy 
men in this city who control it, together with his proposition to 
show them for a consideration a new bonanza, solves itself down 
to this, that such a visit was paid, only the proposition was free 
from its more exaggerated features. Many men who know all 
about this wonderful property, have all along admitted the pros- 
pect for new ore discoveries and the belief now is stronger than 
ever that a new and important development is much closer at 
hand than it was this time last year. A favorable occurrence of 
the kind is not at all unlikely, and when it takes place the 
complexion will be changed before timid operators, who have been 
letting opportunities pass in the way of obtaining cheap stock, 
have a chance to load up. The pumps at the south end are work- 
ing well, and tbe water is rapidly being lowered. With the Corn- 
stocks hanging in tnis comatose condition, little can be expected 
in the way of activity in outside mines. Prices in the Tusca- 
rora group have been a shade firmer, but that is not saying much 
considering the intrinsic value of the mines. The Quijotoas have 
been steady and moderately active. 

READERS of a local contemporary have been treated recently to 
a story about tbe Quartz Mountain Mine of Fresno county. In- 
teresting as it undoubtedly proved to many, a few of the inside 
facts would have been much more so. In describing tbe Hume 
the writer omitted to say that when it was completed, the en- 
gineer discovered that he had been trying to revolutionize the or- 
dinary order of things by causing water to run up hill. The little 
episode was overlooked, about the mining expert who was sent 
down to report on the mine in the interest of the French sharehold- 
ers and who had his samples salted in a most mysterious manner. 
After arranging everything for tbe assay, he left about thirty 
samples over night in the office, with the doors and windows se- 
curely locked and sealed, after first taking the precaution to run 
the powdered ore through a very fine screen. His surprise may 
be imagined, when, on making tbe same test the next morning, 
through the same screen, be found particles of»gold which had been 
introduced during the night, the size of which lead to the detec- 
tion of the attempt at fraud. There were many other incidents 
connected with the affair which could be related, not the least 
trivial of which is the ultimate disposition of the property and 
the valuable machinery, which is now being offered in this city for 
a song. It matters little where any of the manipulators of this 
scheme are, or what they are doing; to know that they exist at 
all, outside of a prison, is sufficient to shake confidence in the ad- 
ministration of justice at home or abroad. 
Ill 

THE proposition to open up a monster mine at the World's 
Fair is unique in its way, and if carried out successfully, an 
opportunity will be afforded our cousins from across the Atlantic 
to form some idea of what a mine is really like— a knowledge 
they fail to possess at present. Many of the adventurers from 
this quarter, who pose as mining men, to the constant loss of 



their compatriots, will also be able to say truthfully that they 
have seen the inside ota property, enabling them to speak more 
intelligibly on the subject. It might be as well, however, to erect 
a structure on the surface and fit it, as now proposed, with drifts 
in different ores and country rock. An elevator to the surface can 
furnish an idea of a shaft, without conveying a disagreeable im- 
pression of the danger which might follow a descent into the 
lower regions. All the profession in Great Britain will undoubt- 
edly make a point of airing their right and title to append M.E. 
to their name on the august occasion, and it would hardly be fair 
to shock their delicate sensibility of the awful, by asking them 
to do such a shocking thing as to go under ground. The monkey 
and parrot time they are bound to indulge in on top, will in itself 
be worth tbe entrance fee in the way of amusement to the 
American miners. 

$$? 

THE recent unfortunate accident at the Utica Mine is one of 
those deplorable affairs which the most cautious mine owners 
cannot guard against. When new wire cables give way, it is the 
manufacturers who should beheld responsible. Wire is a treach- 
erous material in any event, and, outside of mining, many a 
stout vessel has come to grief when the strength of this new 
fangled standing-rigging has been placed under a more than or- 
dinary strain. Not many years ago one of the finest iron clippers 
which was ever launched in Great Britain sailed on her maiden 
voyage for Australia with passengers. No expense had been 
spared in the matter of equipment; below or aloft, every thing 
was the best that money could obtain. Outside the British 
Channel she encountered a gale of wind, the bran-new wire 
rigging snapped like pipe shanks and the masts went over the 
side, the ship herself only being saved by a miracle. With wire- 
rope in use for any purpose, the chances for mishaps cari be 
safely multiplied. 

$ $ s 

AVERY neat souvenir of the Comstock has just been published 
by James H. Crockwell, of Virginia, embracing over fifty 
views of the chief points of interest in Virginia City and Gold 
Hill. These views are admirably reproduced by a new process, 
and, from their selection, gives the stranger who has heard of tbe 
wonderful mines of this locality a clear insight into the mechanical 
departments of hoisting works and mills, with scenes on the lowtr 
levels. «* Dan de Qui lie," the well-known writer on Nevada 
mines, furnished the literary embellishments of this interesting 
little volume. 

Ill 

THERE is said to be a prospect for the sale of tbe old Hite Mine 
of Mariposa, on the lines of the negot : ations laid by Judge 
Walker before he died. He had expended large sums of money 
on this property, from time to time, in development, work and 
the erection of machinery. The commission on the sale will not 
be large, and it is doubtful if it will recoup the estate in the mat- 
ter of expenditures. Considerable gold has been taken out of 
this property from time to time, but from all appearances it will 
require considerable capital to work it as it should be. 

S $ * 

THE Ilex people in London are not dead yet, evidently, judging 
from tbe annual howl which goes up from disgusted share- 
holders. One individual, who takes as a nom de plume the whole 
blessed motto of the Order of the Garter, now complains through 
the press that it has cost exactly the sum of $6,305 during the 
year to effect the sale of $18,000 worth of old atones. The mine 
would hardly bring as luuch in open market to-day. 
# * n 

EX-GOVERNOR TABOR is about to take another pull at the 
plethoric money sacks of the guileless Britons. He offers the 
o!d Matchless Mine, near Leadville, for the modest sum of $400,- 
000. It will be sad should tbe present negotiations end in failure, 
like those for the sale of the Henrietta did. 

THE amount of Mexican copper imported into England during 
the first ten months of 1890 was 3,174 tons, against 2,834 
tons in same period of 1889, and 123 tons in 188S. In 1887 the 
total shipments only amounted to 53 tons. 
* $ 9 

THERE is some talk of erecting powerful machinery on some of 
the properties in the Alamo district of Lower California. Ap- 
pearances must have changed considerably for the better, to war- 
rant such an expensive proceeding. 
99 I 

ASMFLTER of a minimum daily capacity of 25 tons will shortly 
be erected at Sabinal, in the State of Chihuahua. 

I l t 
R. H. M. YERRINGTON of Carson, Nevada, was in town 
during the week. 

$ $ S 
R. JOHN A. FALL, the well-known Mining Engineer, is in 
town. 



M 
M 



Jan. 10. 



BAN FRAN! [SCO NEWS I II hi;. 







•Hearth* Crier!'* "Wh»l the Jcvll eitthOQ 
' Ooe that will pUr ihederll. ilr, with you." 




TIIKKK art times when the Brat impression* ol a newspaper- 
writer overcome that sense of justice which should be par- 
amount with everybody who Rains a large audienee through the 
columns of a journal. I think that within this week I have 
seen a most positive illustration of personal prejudice in regard 
to the Olsen case. The Examiner, an intelligent, bold and inilu- 
entiai newspaper, sends a correspondent to Merced to write up 
a man arrested, but not convicted, of the gravest crime in the 
list of criminal offenses. If this person were the Prosecuting 
Attorney of that county the newspaper argument advanced could 
not be more potent to influence the mind of a jury. In Wed- 
nesday morning's Krmniner, the narrative of the first interview 
with tbeaccused is published. Therein we are informed, thathis 
eyes are deep set and his skin as fresh and delicate as the cheek 
of an English child. That the cheeks of English children should 
be rated higher than the cheeks of California children must 
arouse the wrath of every California mother. Now we come to 
that stage of the narrative where the roasting begins. We are 
told that August Olsen » sat perfectly still with a sullen, dense look 
on his face." Again, that he " took bis slouched hat from a nail, 
sat it on the side of his head at a rowdy angle, put a cigar in his 
mouth and slouched defiantly back to his cell." It will be seen 
by the foregoing that there is a great deal of slouching in the 
Olsen family. Furthermore, " August Olsen slouched defiantly 
into the Court." When the examination was over, " He put his 
hat on the back of his head and slouched sullenly from the 
room." The next contingent dug up by this graphic correspond- 
ent is the widow of the murdered man. She is put on the rack 
and escapes a little better than her brother, but the old lady, her 
mother, gets it in the neck. This unfortunate woman is described 
as being the posse/sor of a '< watchful, malignant face." Also, 
the locky owner of " sharp malignant eyes and a strangely calm 
voice that made my blood run cold." And when this most 
critical and charitable and just correspondent departed from that 
house of sorrow and confusion, whose inmates she had persecuted 
with questions, the widow of the murdered man did not kiss her, 
but " said good-bye, gravely and coldly." The old lady, how- 
ever, did not get off as well, for, says the correspondent, "from 
the window, I thought I saw a malevolent face, seamed with 
wrinkles, watching me balefully as I drove away." I think, to 
use a well-worn phrase, that comment is unnecessary, for the foul 
play of this sort of business when a man is on trial for his life is 
apparent. 

BY the immortal Gods the man will soon come who will give 
us the reverse of the stereotyped newspaper anecdote. He 
wants to read about the mild-mannered, delicate, soft-eyed stran- 
ger, who entered the saloon and was attacked by the bad man of 
the place. And how, when the bad man lifted his hand to smite 
the gentle stranger, the g. s. did not lay him out a quivering mass 
on the floor, but turned tail and shouted for the police. He aches 
to hear of the green-looking countryman who sat down at cards 
with a gang of sharpers, and instead of winning an impossible 
number of games, and proving to be a boss gamester in disguise, 
was really nothing more than an infernal fool of a granger, who 
lost his coin as quick as he staked it. Also, how, when the bull- 
dog chased Seraphinas' lover, instead of tearing a section out of 
the rear of his pants, the ferocious beast had his head kicked by 
that agile young man. Likewise, that the wife of the man who 
went fishing did noL get the bill for the fish her husband bought 
in the market, but the lie stuck, as all good lies should, and the 
wife believed ever afterward that her husband caught those fish 
himself. We want the bootjack that wasjthrownat the cat to bit 
the cat, and not carom on the bald-headed man in the next yard. 
We desire the drunken man who came home late should divest 
himself of his hat before retiring and not be reminded by his wife 
that it was still on his head. He will be a daring man who will de- 
part from the beaten path of anecdote, but he will win the ap- 
plause and gratitude of a long-suffering world. 

SHE never wears a low-neck dress in weather excessively 
warm, 
But her sleeve, cut up to the elbow, shows a snowy and dimpled 

arm. 
She denounces the maidens and matrons who like to indulge in 

this fashion, 
And over their lack of discretion gets into a terrible passion. 
» Of course," she declares, " if one chooses, 'tis not wicked to 

show the arm 
As far as the elbow, and higher, I certainly see no harm." 
Of muslin she's rather shy, and says that the partial revealing 
Of charms beneath its soft webs, is worse than the total revealing 

The reason Miss is a prude, is not other girls are bolder, 

But only because she's ashamed of a terrible mole on her shoulder. 



Ri NNiNG brooki end shedy nooks, 
Where lovera li^-- t«. bide 

And reed in Mother Neture'i t ks, 

I < if, greet end rippling tide. 

1 in Id story, ever young, 

i lie same delightful lound, 
By brooklet lisped, by wild bird sung 

" Love makes the world go round. 

or if they will nol ring of love, 

Lei them the praises tell, 
Of picnic In a shady grove 

Or chenl ol the hotel. 

Where beds are soft, and rooms are neut, 

A ml beef and mutton tine, 
And milk is fresh, and batter sweet 

(At just so much a line.) 

Or if they will not sing of these, 
Let them their gay harps smite, 

To drugs which all mankind must please, 
And livers, hearts and lights. 

Forever, and forever keep 

From every mortal ill, 
Oh, who will dare eat, drink or sleep, 

Without that potent pill? 

Or, if to sing of doctors' stuff, 

The bard's soul doth not please, 

They warble of asparagus, 

Mushrooms and early peas. 

It does not matter, so they sing, 

For times be awful hard, 
When peas and love come in 

We have no crop of bards. 

A GENTLEMAN residing in this city on Pacific avenue, in 
the absence of his wife, opened the letters of that dame, 
end found enough to convince him that she was slightly 
gay. He threatens to give away the names of the writers when 
the divorce suit is brought into court. The authors of these ten- 
der epistles are, of course, " leading society men." This is really 
becoming monotonous. No scandal of any magnitude can be 
ventilated these times unless the leading society man is mixed up 
in it. And the question will naturally suggest itself to the out- 
side moralist, what the deuce is the matter with society, when it 
selects such leaders. Is the leading society man always on the 
qui vive for an illegitimate racket, and is society or his own 
natural depravity responsible for those reprehensible eccentrici- 
ties? Now, the leading society woman is much better behaved. 
She does not keep on getting into the papers and making people 
uncomfortable. She goes along quietly, and even if she has a dif- 
ference with a sister leader about an Easter bonnet, or some 
other important trifle, the newspaper reporters are not one bit 
the wiser. She should open a school of morals, and give semi- 
weekly lessons in either the art of good behavior or covering up 
tracks to those ornaments of her saloon — the leading society man. 

HOW, in the name of meal tickets, is the artist to live unless he 
paints pot-boilers? Is a fellow to waste months in painting 
a fine picture, and then to grow fat on the admiration he excites, 
while nobody steps in to buy it? Picture making in this State is 
getting down, or up to the level of horse-shoeing. The more 
horses the farrier shoes, the heavier grows his purse. The more 
pictures the artist paints, the more easily he rests at night in the 
room he has paid for, and more contentedly he looks forward to 
the dinner which does not have to go upon the slate. Art and 
poverty are twin sisters, and only the mercantile artist can send 
his undesirable relation to seek another affinity. All are in pur- 
suit of the golden fleece, but it is only the insurance solicitor, life, 
fire or marine, who revels in the wool sheared by the sharp edges 
of his glib tongue. Wealth and luxury ever attend this fortunate 
being. The insurance solicitor in San Francisco is ever the thrice- 
blessed of otherwise inconstant fortune. He runs the restraints, 
the belles and the clubs, and it is only when he runs away with 
some trifling thousands that the shafts of severe comment are 
very pointed against him. 

A BEAUTIFUL actress sent word this week to a reporter that 
she was indisposed, but would receive him nevertheless. 
And she did, reclining in bed in a silk dressing-gown, as the 
precise rascal informs us. The handsome actress must have un- 
limited confidence in the discretion of reporters. There are many 
little things of vertu about a lady's dressing-room, which some 
of those fellows would not hesitate to reveal. To be transported 
from the dull realism of the "local" room, with its cuspidors, 
calendars, and melancholy mass of waste paper, to the bed- 
chamber of a lovely actress, the fair tenant reclining upon her 
couch in a silk dressing robe, is calculated to shock the journal- 
istic equilibrium and cast the poor devil into a love-trance, from 
which the painful actuality of having to dress up a police item 
in Macaulay English is a sad awakening. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour.good home and foreign demand: Extras $4.20@$4.30: Superfine, J3.25. 

Wheat, steady, good trade; Shipping, ?1.3o; Milling, $1.37@$1. 40 per ctl. 

Barlev, in favor; Brewing, «.50@tt .65: Feed, $1.50@$1.55 per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, tl.S0@ll.9ri; Feed, tl.7r@$1.90 per ctl. 

Corn. White, tl 35; Yellow, tl.30@tl.36 per ctl. 

Kve, light stock, good demand, tl.30($tl.35. 

Hay. free supply; Wheat, tl3@tlS: Oats, tll@tl4; Alfalfa, J12@$13.50. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, t22@t23 per ton. 

Beans, good request, t2.7.6!a;?:-i.40 per ctl. Potatoes, 90c.@tl 26 per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 3iic.@38c. : Fair, 2.">c.@30c; Pickle i, 30c@32i.ic. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@13c. Eggs, good supply, 32c.@35c. 

Honey, Comb, 12c.@15c. : Extracted, t;c.@7c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions, $:5@$3.26 per ctl. Beeswax is scarce at 20c.@23c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are lower; Dry, 7c@9c. Wool is in demand at 12c.@20c. 

Provisions move off steadilv. Bags favor the buyer at 6c.($6>4c. 

Coffee steady at 20c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is less firm, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready bale. 

Quicksilver, slow of sale at t62.50 per flask. Hops are held firmly, 32c.@40c. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. Steady prices. 

The rains thus far in January have been timely and copious, 
tending to rejoice the hearts of all tillers of the soil, the dairy 
men and others engaged in tree planting, vine dressing, etc. Al- 
ready pasturage is becoming quite good, and we may soon ex- 
pect supplies of fresh grass, Butter, etc., in our markets. This 
is not the season of the year for businesp activity in any trade 
department. The outlook for the future is certainly encouraging. 
Coal imports and receipts from all quarters by sea for 1890 ag- 
gregate 1,204,555 tons; same 1889, 1,351,957 tons; 1888, 1,386,463 
tons. The years traffic has been a very profitable one to the coast 
colliers — profits this winter have been large. Of coke, foreign 
imports for the past year, 18,809 tons; same in 1889, 21,024 tons. 
At this tiuie Australian cargoes of coal are being offered for sale 
at lessened rates and so also of English, both for future delivery. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Company's steamship City of New 
York brought up from the Isthmus a large cargo of manufactured 
iron and heavy mdse from New York. From Europe, 45 cs linens, 
36 cs cotton goods, 85 cs paper, 46 pkgs mdse, etc. ; also from Central 
America, 1,860 bags coffee; from Mexico, 832 bxs limes, 1,708 bags 
ore, and $62,900.75 in treasure. 

Steamship Acapulco hence for the Isthmus carried in transit for 
New York 100 bales rags, 1,632 galls brandy, 100 bbls glue, 4,121 
ctls barley, 29,716 lbs beans, 14,201 galls wine, etc., value fllS,- 
068. To Central America, 9,720 bbls flour, 1,047 ctls corn, 138 M 
ft lumber, 381 cs salmon, 400 bbls sugar, 10,263 lbs rice, 2,250 lbs 
codfish, 2,503 lbs beans, 30,061 lbs tallow, 275 galls brandy, 52,275 
lbs malt, 359 pkgs beer, 2,578 galls wine, etc., value, $81,192. ■ To 
Mexico, 300 flasks quicksilver, etc., value, $16,508. To Panama, 
26,369 lbs sugar, 2,338 lbs rice, etc., value, $2,606. 

The Pacific Mail steamship City of Pekin, from the Orient, 
brought for cargo 37,378 mats Siam Rice, 3,317 pkgs. Tea, 1,589 
cs. Oil, 289 bags Coffee, 64 bales Calcutta Gunnies, 1,030 bags 
Beans, 1,477 rolls Matting, 8,500 pkgs. Chow-chow, and from 
Japan, 5,583 bxs. Mandarin Oranges, etc.; also, in transit, to go 
to Eastern cities overland, 3,810 pkgs. Tea and 503 pkgs. raw 
Silk, 127 pkgs Silk Goods and 500 pkgs. Mdse. 

A valuable cargo for Liverpool was that carried by the British 
ship California, hence on the 5th inst. It consisted of 55,973 cs. 
Salmon, 15 460 bbls. Flour, 27,749 ctls. Wheat, 99,993 lbs. Cotton, 
32,405 lbs. Pearl Shells, 167 cs. Honey, 1,800 gals. Wine, 103 gals. 
Brandy, 89,359 lbs. Borax, 719 lbs. Dried Fruit, 246.813 lbs. Tal- 
low, 113 bales Wool, all of the value of $400,000. This ship also 
carried for London 823 gals. Wine, etc.; also, to Hamburg, Ger- 
many, 20 cs. Cotton Clothing. 

Lumber receipts at this port for 1890 were: Of Pine 237,186,620 
feet, of Redwood, 166,274,070 feet, shingles 13,923,500 and of 
railroad ties 1,344,094, showing a falling off as compared with 
the year preceeding of 10,000,000 feet of pine, an increase of 
23,000,000 shingles and of railroad ties an increase of 500.000. 

Quicksilver receipts for 1890, 12,917 flks ; 1889, 16,264 flks ; 1888, 
22,824 flks. 

Exports by sea and rail; 1890, 8,323 flks; do. 1889, 12,586; do. 
1888, 12,599 flks. 

Produce receipts in San Francisco from California and Oregon 
for 1890 are, as follows: Wheat, centals, 14,264,134; Flour, bbls., 
1,451,925; Barley, centals, 1,889,776; Oats, centals, 524,177; Beans, 
435,372 sks. : Potatoes, 1,070,798 sks. ; onions, 88,569 sks. ; Honey, 
16,763 cs.; Wine, 11,229,287 gals. ; Butter, 12,583,400 lbs. ; Cheese, 
6,825,700 lbs; Eggs, 6,122,776 dozs. 

Steamship Australia, hence for Honolulu on the 2d inst., had 
for cargo 948 bbls. Flour, 10,000 lbs. Sugar, 355 bxs. Apples and 
general mdse. value 127,000; also in treasure, $50,000. 

The 0. & O. S. S. Belgic for China had for cargo 12,452 
bbls. Flour, 22,026 lbs. Ginseng and general mdse., value $142,- 
237; also in treasure for Hongkong, $358,682; for Japan 37,000 
lbs. Bark; 2,805 bbls. Flour and mdse. value $16,912; also in 
treasure to Yokohoma, $143,000; to Manila 600 bis. Flour and 
18 pkgs. Provisions value $2,751. 



-B-^nSTICS- 



CAPITAL PAID UP.. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

$3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 7,000,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 
Head Office— 60 LOMBARD STREET. London. 

Branches— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver, Nanalmo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank aud National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 



THE REPUBLIC SAVINGS, BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Incorporated and acting under the laws of California. Charter granted 
for 50 years. Authorized to issue 250,000 shares— par value, $100. 

Capita/ Subscribed $4l0,000. 

A. H. MACDONALD, President. Da. CHARLES E. BLAKE, Vice-Pres't. 
Bank of British Columbia, Treasurer. 

San Francisco Office— 624 Market street. Oakland Otfice— 471 Ninth street. 
Certificates of Shares issued upon application, earning investor one per 
cent per mouth. All loaus made on first-mortgage on real estate. Paid-up 
Stock investors respectfully solicited. Loans of $1,000 payable in monthly 
payments of $16. By-Laws, Prospectus aud Circulars given upon application. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND S 1,640,000 OO. 

Deposits January 2, 1891 24,340,988 55. 

Officers— President, L. GOT TIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE ; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, Chas. Meinecke, O. 
Schoemann, E. Meyer, F. Tillmauu, H. Horstmann, M. Ehrman. Attorney, 
John R. Jabboe. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loaus on Approved 
securities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital 4300.000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Eeal Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINB STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL 11.000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. P. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jb. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH Pbesident. 

W. E. BROWN Vicb-Pbesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashike. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

T*. W. or. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 92,600,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $450,000. 
Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, ^Boule- 
vard PoisBoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Managers. 

C . Altschtjl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,0001 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligmau & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. FRED. F. LOW. } Managers 

IGN. STEINHART, ! Mana S er8 - 
P. N. LiLiENTHAi, Cashier. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



BAN FK VNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



W- RoSeM 




LETHE. 

I stand alone by * rivcr> brink — 

Placid and silvery clear it BoWfJi 
I have but to stoop and from it drink. 

And I shall forget my cares and woes. 
That were a boon to forget the past, 

With all Its sorrow, its tears and pain, 
Its pleasures and joys too sweet to lasl, 

The struggle and toil of band and brain. 
Its trials, temptations, faults and sin?, 

I hasten to drink — and yet — and yet 
I pause before oblivion wins: 

Is there anything I would not forget? 
The sound of a voice I heard of old. 

The glance of eyes full of love and trust, 
The touch of a hand that's long been cold, 

Of warm, red lips that have long been dust? 
With a start I turn from Lethe's brink, 

Oblivion may be sweet — and yet 
The Fates be thanked that I did not drink. 

There are some things I would not forget. 

MY MOTHERS GRAVE.— Elizabeth If. Birkbeck. 



I love to linger round the sacred spot 

And strew sweet flowers upon the grassy mound, 
Where low and peacefully she sleeps 
Within the ground. 
I love to seat me by her silent grave, 

And gaze upon the starry, evening sky, 
For there I know an angel bright and fair, 

She lives on high. 
I know her spirit hovers round me yet, 

And gently whispers to my Baddened heart 
That there's a heaven where we shall meet again, 

Never to part. 
Around my heart, oh, may her memory twine, 

To guard my wandering footsteps, lest they stray, 
And may its influence, holy and sublime, 

Teach me to pray. 
That I may find that peaceful, happy land 

Where kindred ties can never more be broken, 
And where the bitter, sad farewell 
Is never spoken. 

THERE'S THE RUB— Pittsburg Chronicle. 

To give or not to give, that is the question? 

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to settle 

With clamorous creditors who have long dunned me, 

Or turn a deaf ear still unto their pleading. 

To spend my all for presents?— to creep — to sneak 

With bated breath beneath the friendly desk 

When comes the harsh collector's knocking, 

And bribe the boy to say I'm out of town, 

Or disappoint expectant relatives 

By disregarding all the traditions 

Which make. calamity of Christmas time 

To men of scanty means? But there's the snub, 

The freezing glance, the epithet of miser, 

When o'er I circulated among my kin 

Which made me rather choose familiar ills 

Than fly to others that I know not of. 

Yes, the ancient debts must stand. 



RIGHT IN HIS LINE.— Boston Courier. 

Thro' half the night he'd walked the floor 

With little Willie, 
Whose infant mouth did overpour 

Its accents shrilly, 
Till Spriggins, losing patience, swore 

If he'd a billy 
He'd thump his pesky offspring sore, 

And knock him silly. 

Said Mrs. S., from downy be'd, 

So gently purring, 
"Why, Spriggins, you should praise, instead 

Of thus demurring; 
That pastime's quite in keeping, Fred, 

With your preferring: 
Your motto is — you've often said — 

« Be up and stirring.' " 



BAISTICS- 



BANK Of CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital tS.OOO.OOf 00 

Surplni 1.000.0CO 00 

Undivided Profit* (July tut, 1«90) 2,091,568 76 

WM. AXVO&D, rreftldent. 

Thomas Browm. .Cannier | B. Murray. Jr Amuoaiii Cashier 

AOENT8:* 

NKW YORK-Agcnry of the Bank of California: BOSTON-Tremout 
National Hank; CHICAGO— Union National Hunk; ST. LOUIS— Boatman '■ 
Bank; NKW ZEALAND— The Bank of Now Zealand. Corresponded tu 
Loudou— Me»>r-. N M EtoUuohlld A Sons. CorruHpoudoDtslu India, Ohio*, 
Japan ami Australia. 

The Bank ha> AneiH'i.- at Virginia City, and Correspondent* In all the, 
principal Mi nine District* and Interior I owns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit turned, available In all part* of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boht.tu. rhieaKo, Ht. Ixiuls, New Orleans, Denver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati Portland. O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin. Paris, Berlin. Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort nut he Mam, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock* 
holm, Christiana, Locaruo, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hougkoug 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities iu Italv aud Switzerland. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



v W. Corner Saiuomc and Blush Street**. 

Established 1870. U 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $69,200 

S. G. MURPHY. President I E. D.MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.... Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 



Geo. A. Low, 
N. Van Bergen, 
Jas. H. Jennings, 



directors: 
George C. Perkius, 
James D. Phelau, 
Johu A. Hooper, 



S. G. Murphy, 
James Mollitt. 
J. D. Harvey. 



A General Banking it u sines* Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to reut from $5 to $100 per anuum (under the exclusive control of 
the reuter), for tne care of all valuables. Trunks aud Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 



Authorized Capital. 
Reserve 



.$3,500,000 | Capital paid up 2,450,000 

345,000 



San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard St.,E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1006 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in Loudon and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital ; $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 



JAMES K. WILSON 

J. L N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. 



President 

J. 8. HUTCHINSON, Manager 



Directors: Chas. Maiu, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. Loudon— Brown, 
dhipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Ccr. of Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Savings Bank deposits received, and interest paid on same semiannually, 
in January and July. Ratesof interest forthe LastThreeTerms: 5.58per 
cent on term deposit and 4.65 per cent on ordinary deposits, free of tax. 
Deposits received from one dollar upwards. Open Saturday Evenings. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY— BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $5,000,000.00 

D/REC TORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President; Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C, Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norrls, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. WadBWorth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Bankin 
Business. ___ _ 

HUMBOLDT SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869, 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Seceetaey 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



'&*±. RfiKRi* 




TJ ERE are dow in existence seven Commissions for the exten- 
sion and widening of streets in this city. Each Commission 
consists of three Commissioners, whose salary is fixpd at $200 a 
month, making $4,200 a month; each Commission also has a Secre- 
tary at a monthly salary of $150, making $1,050 a month, and an 
attorney whose fees run anywhere from $2,500 to $10,000. Then 
there are incidental expenses and also charges for surveys. The 
annual total sum of money thus gathered in by these Commissions 
and their adjuncts is not far from $100,000. Some of these Com- 
missions have been in existence but a short time, whereas others 
have managed to hang on for more than a year. On the other hand, 
the services rendered are largely of a perfunctory and nominal 
nature, such as could well be performed by one Commission, 
formed out of officials, say the Surveyor, Chairman of the Street 
Committee and Auditor, or City and County Attorney, at $100 a 
month each. Mayor Sanderson seems to have grasped the situation 
on this point quite thoroughly, for he has recommended that the 
Supervisors look into the '< Commission " question. But, inasmuch 
as the law provides for Commissions of this kind, the readiest and 
quickest method of suppressing the abuse would be to have the 
Act in question amended by the Legislature. It should not be 
permitted to stand, for a more wasteful and cumbersome method 
of opening streets has never been devised. The present move- 
ment in Southside Lands does not seem to meet with favor in some 
quarters. By Southside Lands is meant that portion of " Outside 
Lands " lying south of the Park and bounded on the south by the 
Four League Line, which traverses the peninsula from west to 
east at the outlet of Lake Merced. This movement in Southside 
Lands assumed large proportions during the latter half of 1890, 
and, under it, values arose to a point where the most sanguine did 
not expect to see them within tive year's time. 

Blocks, parts of blocks 'and single lots sold right and left at 
ever advancing prices until at the present day this section of San 
Francisco's real estate attracts more attention than any other. 
Nor has the fact that an electric railroad franchise has been ob- 
tained and the promise that the road is to be built, had a quieting 
effect upon business in this quarter. On the contrary there is a 
well-developed tendency to speculate in this class of property, a 
tendency by the way to which full opportunity is to be given. 
But there is also some dealers who are frowning upon this branch 
of their business. They insist that the land has not the value 
for which it is sold and that the majority of people who buy 
have but a hazy idea of what they are getting "south of the 
Park." There are probably some who are mislead by the phrase 
" south of the Park " into thinking that all this property is near 
to the Park. Such, however, is not the case. The territory in 
question extends from the Park line southerly a distance of two 
miles, containing G63 blocks of land. 

It is bounded on the north by H street, which runs along the 
south side of the Park, all parallel streets being named after the 
letters of the alphabet down to W. There are sixteen tiers of 
blocks southwardly, each block being 200x600, the longer front- 
ages running northwardly and not as in the Western Addition 
westwardly. The "streets," being those running to the ocean, are 
80 feet in width, whereas the "avenues," being the intersecting 
streets running parallel with the ocean, are 70 feet in width. By 
way of comparison, it may be stated that the territory more than 
equals that portion of the city bounded by Larkin, and Hayes 
street, Masonic Avenue carried northward to the bay, that is, 
say the entire Western Addition. From all of the foregoing, it 
would seem to follow that here, as elsewhere, the buyer will have 
to discriminate. All the land lies southward of the Park and east 
of the ocean, but some of it is so very much south and east that 
its propinquity to either ocean or park should be no factor in es- 
tablishing value. The crying need of the section, however, is a 
more direct connection with the city and that can but be obtained 
by the extension of Market street. 

The market for the week, in fact, ever since New Year's, has 
been steadily picking up. The belief is very general that busi- 
ness will continue to improve, and that the market will run 
closely on the lines of that of the past year. Of course nearly all 
of the sales now announced were negotiated during the old year, 
though only closed after January 1st. Among these are: 137 :6x 
137:6 on the southwest corner of Golden Gate avenue and Steiner 
street; 68:9x137:6 on the north side of Turk street, 137 :6 feet 
west of Devisadero, $7,000; 137:6x127:8 on the north side of 
Jackson street, 137.6 feet west of Walnut, $8,750, and 27:6x137:6 
on the south side of Golden Gate avenue, 137:6 feet west of 
Buchanan. 

Quite interesting transfers are the following, all of them of 
North Beach fifty varas: Southeast corner of Taylor and Jeffer- 
son; southwest corner of Jefferson and Jones; middle fifty vara 
on south side of Jefferson, west of Taylor street, the price being 
in the neighborhood of $22,000 for the three; also, 137:6x137:6 on 
the southwest corner of Jefferson and Broderick streets, and 



137:6x109 on the southeast corner of Chestnut street and Van 
Ness avenue. * 

The J. C. Jordan purchase of the westerly 1,000 feet of the 
Laurel Hill Cemetery Tract has been recorded. The consideration 
stated is $115,000. 

There has also been recorded a sale by Leland Stanford to Jas. 
P. McCarthy of 589 acres of the San Miguel Rancho. The south- 
east corner of Sutter and Jones streets, 41 :2xl25, was sold for 
$42,000. Another sale in the same neighborhood was that of 
53:6x87:6 on the southeast corner of Taylor and Pine streets. 

Outside Land sales included blocks 1219, 795 for $8,700; por- 
tions of block 328; the west half of block 730, block 923 for 
$6,000. A five acres tract on the Potrero, near the California 
Refinery, has been sold for $25,000. 

The San Francisco Real Estate Exchange will commence opera- 
tions during the current month. The first public sale will be 
held on the 28th inst., on which occasion a list of property will 
be disposed of, to which each firm represented on the Exchange 
has contributed but one parcel. 



The State Citrus Fair opens at Marysville on Monday next, the 
12th. and will close on Saturday, the 17th. On this latter day there 
will be a grand excursion to the Fair, which will at the same time 
afford an opportunity of visiting the great Northern Citrus Belt and 
the lovelv Palermo Colony. This colony furnished a striking ex- 
ample of what can be accomplished by careful cultivation, where a 
comparatively barren waste has been converted into a paradise, 
showing, also, that the citrus fruits can be grown in this portion of 
Northern California as successfully as in the South. All who are able 
should take advantage of this excursion to the Fair at Marysville, 
where the Northern counties generally will exhibit their various pro- 
ductions, and which will be one of the finest and best exhibitions of 
citrus fruits ever held in the State. 



If faithfully used, Ayer's Sarsaparilla will remove scrofula in what- 
ever form it exists. 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 

RUBBER CLOTHING, 
UMBRELLAS, 

WOOLEN UNDER- 
WEAR SUITS. 



MACINTOSH AND CAPE COATS! 
TO-DAY. 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 



924 to 930 Market Street. 



BUY "U.S." 44 WINCHESTER, 22 SHORT 

And other "U.S." Pistol and Rifle Cartridges. For accuracy and 
certainty of tire they have no equal. 

XT. S. CABTEIEG-B CO. 



KEYLESS 
AUX. FIRE ALARM BOX. 

SIZE 4X6 IN. 



INSTANTANEOUS FIRE ALARM 




In ewe of first 


rrnV 




ind pull il 


V 












troin ILa itrt 


•1 box I D 


m Oll0n . 



Buildings connected direct with the Fire 
Department under Franchise granted by 
the City Government. 

Premises equipped with this System are 
granted a reduced rate of insurance. 

Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Co., 

323 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



SAN PR W« [Si O NKWfl I KTTER. 



19 



THE BOURSE AND I'NDERWKITKK 

I Stkrkt. January 10.1801. 

Til v. mariiit Badvrwrilcn art irjlng their bwl t»» maka * otaing* 
in the existing condition of atT.iirv M that they ukiy bfl tblfi 

to do h lomothtng like a paying buis. Prwentntos, 

they tay, are from thirty to forty per rent, too low, and unless 
ibey arc soon raised to such figures that the probabilities >•( profit 
are increased to something nearer certainty, a number of foreign 
companies will withdraw from the toast and seek business else- 
where. It is considered that the figures of five yean will give ft 
guod general average in insurance business, and these QgOTM 
show the fact that marine rates have been steadily falling here 
for some years past, and that if future business is at about the 
same rate as that done since 1885, the taking of ri-ks on vessels 
might as well stop right now. for there is not enough profit in the 
business to pay to carry it. Rates on wheat vessels have reduced 
steadily, so that now, instead of being 2' 4 , they are 1) per cent., 
with a 25 per cent, rebate. That rebate is a powerful drag that 
pulls otf an immense amount of money that would otherwise go 
to increase profits. Affairs have come to such a pass, that the 
managers of those companies which are most directly interested 
in marine insurance, are now negotiating for the adoption of a 
schedule of rates, which will allow them what they consider 
** reasonable " profit. In a month or six weeks it will be known 
what conclusions have been reached, and then a schedule of 
higher rates will be adopted, or announcement will be made of 
the withdrawal of several companies. It is possible at this time 
to state that much definitely, for interviews with several prom- 
inent underwriters show that the feeling is general that a crisis 
must soon be reached. The business does not pay as now con- 
ducted, it is said, and it is merely a question of better rates or 
none. The losses last year were very heavy, and on account of 
the large number of companies competition has become very 
keen. The number of marine agencies in this city is in great ex- 
cess of the number in New York City, in proportion to the busi- 
ness done. It seems to be a case of the survival of the agencies 
here, the stockholders of whose companies are the most accom- 
modating. 

The firm of Jacobs & Easton has dissolved, the business being 
continued under the style of Geo. Easton & Co. The members of 
the new company are George Easton, Julius Jacobs, E. P. Farns- 
worth and A. Wonzelburger. Mr. Jacobs, who has been prominent 
in the local insurance world for thirty years, is interested in a 
great number of affairs, and, for some time past, has wished to 
withdraw from the insurance business, so that he might devote 
more of his attention to his other interests. For this reason the 
old firm changed its style to the present. Mr. Easton will be the 
active man, the understanding being that Mr. Jacobs will be al- 
lowed bis desire, and will, therefore, devote more time to outside 
concerns. As soon as possible, and probably about the 15th inst., 
the new company will move its offices to 423 California street, 
where the headquarters of its fine city agencies will be located in 
the rear portion of the large office of the Southern California. The 
city agency of the Southern California will also be in the rear of 
the large office. One set of clerks will keep the books of all these 
city agencies, which, however, will be as distinct in their manage- 
ment as they are now. 

A number of prominent local underwriters are grimly smiling 
over a letter received by them recently from one William J. Gavi- 
gan, now of Seattle, Washington. When "Billy," as he was fa- 
miliarly known to politicians and court records, lived in this city, 
he was said to be a great admirer and a faithful disciple of the 
now deposed Bush street boss. "Billy" always was endowed 
with more than the ordinary ability under which the average 
lamb labors, and, some time ago, probably foreseeing the fall of 
Buckley, Gavigan pulled up stakes and went north to the land of 
the boom. He settled at Seattle, and has already gained the dis- 
tinction of being attacked in the editorial columns of the Telegraph 
of that city, on account of his attempt to introduce Bush street 
methods into the politics of the Maiden State. Gavigan now poses 
as a Republican. His letters, which astonished the Underwriters, 
were carefully written epistles, stating that the Washington Legis- 
lature was about to meet, and that possibly bills affecting insurance 
companies might be introduced, wherefore, if the Underwriters 
would call upon or write to Gavigan, he would be glad to consult 
with them over the possible legislation. I have yet to hear of 
any one who opened his heart or his purse strings to William J. 
The Underwriter is a wary bird, and it takes a shrewder play than 
this recent one of "Billy's" to extract the golden eggs. , 

Arthur C. Donnell, recently manager of the local department of 
the California Insurance Company, has joined J. Okell and E. 0. 
Miller, under the firm name of Okell, Donnell & Co. Donnell 
was with the California for fifteen years. As a token of apprecia- 
tion, the company, on his retirement, presented him with a gold 
watch and a handsomely engrossed testimonial. Hermann 
Nathan and Paul Kingston will hereafter perform the duties 
formerly covered by Mr. Donnell. 

E. Niles has succeeded the late J. W. Staples in the Union. 

C. P, Stringer, formerly Secretary of the South British, has re- 
turned to this city. 



Thr from Rolla v. Wall to i.. i.. BromweU, 

The Alliance Marine baa gone from Parrot v Co, to J, J, Moore 

The Underwriters' Fire Patrol will elect Directors i i, 

Sarin 

ICorniu be jog Byrup" to 

t 'hildr.-n while reelhiinr. IT , .■■•■ .. ■ni- a boU 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Paople'a Komt s«vingR B.nk. 
For the half veu ■ 11 1 1 ml 01 Bl, 16 0, 1 dlvldoo 1 im* been deolared 

ftllhe rnlo of MY.- Hii.l Kitty l\v.. t Iiiniilr.'.lt b i ' DOI OOUt per milium 

1111 Term Deposits, mi. I Four »n.| sivlv One liiin.l rr.lth- 11. (II) per .'.-lit per 

annum nu ordinary PcpnMb., free of taxes, payable on end utter Friday, 
January '„>, 18 i. it. 1 1. CARR, Beoro'.ary. 

OFFit t r eel. Flood Building, S an FranelM.., Oil. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office or ihe Hibernia Savings and Lonn Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Hoard of Dlreotors|of this society, held THIS 
DAY, a dividend has hovn declared ni the rule of l' , per cent per imiiuiii 
ou all deposits for the six mouths ending December 81, 1890, free from an 
taxes, and payable cm and after .lanuarv 2, J 891, R. J. TOBIN, Sec 

OFFICE— Northea st c omer Montgomery nml Post Streets, S. F., Cal, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For (he half year ending with 31st December, 181)0, a dividend has been 

declared at the rate of five and four-tenths (5 4-10) per ecu! per annum on 

term deposits aud four and one-half (4 , 2 )perecut per annum on ordinary 

deposits, free of taxes, payable ou aud after FRIDAY, 2d January, 1891. 

lovkll white, Cashier. 
Office— 532 California street, corner Webb. Branch, 1700 Market street, 
corner Polk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud fifty-eight hundredths (5 58-10J1 per cent per annum 
on Term Deposits, and four aud sixty-five hundredths (4 6j-lu0) per cent 
per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, aud payable on and after 
FRIDAY, January 2, 18J1. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Corner of Powell aud Eddystre ts. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Soci ty. 

For the half-year eudiug December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five aud forty-himdredths (5 40-100) percent per annum on 

term deposits, and four aud oue-half (4\4) per cent per annum ou ordinary 

deposits, payable on and after FRIDAY, Jauuary 2, ISjI 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— No. 526 California street. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND No. 154. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 
Will pay its regular monthly dividend of one dollar (?1) per share upon its 
capital stock on Jaauary 10, 1891. 

CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five and Four-teuths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, aud Four and One-half (i.%) per oeut per aunum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, and payable on and after Friday, January 2, 1891. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— No. 619 Clay Street, San Fraucisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five aud Four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per aunum ou Term De- 
posits, and Four aud One-half (4)4) per oeut per aunum ou Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable ou aud after Friday, Jauuary 2, 1891. 
F JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— N o. 33 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

2,000,000 ACRES! 

Vast Estates or Acre Lots. All Specialties in Land. 



Stock, Dairy, Grain, Fruit and General Farms, Resorts, Timber Land 
Mexican Land, Mines, Town Sites aud Lots, City Mansions, Country Villas 
and Sites, Investment and Speculative Properties. Money to Loan. 
Send ten cents for 110 page Catalogue. 

C. II. STRUCT JSi CO., Land Agents, 
415 Montgomery Street. 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 

Ladies and gentlemen desiring to 
send to their friends East the 
TABLE WINES 

OF the 
INGLENOOK VINEYARD, 
Can have their orders filled at San 
Francisco prices aud of freight at 
car-load rates added, thus saving a 
great expense by leaving their or- 
ders in time with 

F. A. HABER, 
Sole Agent of the Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S.F. 




20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



- J~\ <■< 



WctenjyFfaftseri/l 



TH 3 luxurious rose bath is a luxury far off, desirable, but un- 
attainable, so says the practical uiitid; but not ao. This luxury 
of the ancients can be obtained by the nineteenth century maiden 
at a cost next to nothing. The bath of roses can be made as 
follows: The warm water, in quantity amounting to the usual re- 
quirement of the bath, is first softened by stirring into the tub 
finely sifted oatmeal, into which also is added half a pint of gly- 
cerine; lastly, put into it two drops of attar of roses. If the mas- 
sage treatment be available, use it by all means; if not, let a 
coarse towel and hard rubbing serve the purpose of the massage 
system. This bath is simply fine, as it softens the skin and blends 
perfume into each line of the body. After all, to obtain it is a 
simple thing, too, the two drops of attar of rose3 being the great- 
est expense of all. 

The proposed Irish Channel Tunnel is now so far advanced 

as an actual project that the Mayor of Belfast recently convened 
a public meeting to consider the scheme. He convened the meet- 
ing on an urgent requisition signed by about seventy representa- 
tive men of the North of Ireland, who state their belief that a 
tunnel to connect the Antrim coast with the coast of Wigtonshire, 
and thereby the railway system of Scotland and England with 
Belfast and the north of Ireland, would be a great public advan- 
tage, and would have immense and far-reaching beneficial results 
to the three kingdoms. 

The low birth rate in France, which means a gradual de- 
population of the country, engaged the attention of the French 
Academy the other day. Mr. Lagneau, after reading a paper on 
the subject, suggested these remedies among others: Simplification 
of the marriage laws, limitation of military service, elaboration of 
the colonial idea, naturalization of all the strangers in France, 
numbering 1,200,000, and the establishment of refuges for poor or 
unfortunate mothers, who would then have less excuse for aban- 
doning their infants. — Exchange. 

The use of wood-cresote, which is extensively distilled in 

North Carolina from the wood of Pinus Palustris, is recommended 
by Capt. W. H. Bixby for antiseptic purposes. It destroys vege- 
table and animal life, repels moisture and coagulates fermentable 
matter. As a paint for wooden or metallic surfaces, it preserves 
them from wet and dry rot, rust and the attacks of insects; and, 
when forced by hydraulic pressure into the pores of wood, its an- 
tiseptic effects are extended to the very center of the block. 

A new industry has sprung up in Germany with the young 

leaves of the wild strawberry plant. Having been carefully dried 
they are used instead of Chinese tea, and are said to approach 
that beverage closely in taste. An addition of young bramble 
and woodruff leaves is said to add to the excellent flavor of this 
most inexpensive of teas. This is the last straw for China teas. 
Driven out of the London market by Indian and Ceylon growths, 
their supremacy in other places threatened, they are finally to have 
strawberry leaves put in competition with them! 

— Recent information gathered by the German forestry com- 
mission, on the age of trees, assigns to the pine tree 500 and 700 
years as the maximum, 4:25 years to the silverfir, 275 years to the 
larch, 245 years to the red beech, 200 to the birch, 170 to the ash, 
145 to the alder and 130 to the elm. The heart of the oak begins 
to rot at about the age of 300 years. The holly oak alone escapes 
this law, it is said, and there is a specimen of this aged 410" years 
in existence near Aschaffenburg in Germany. 

Workers in ornamental wood now assert that yellow pine, 

hard finished in oils, is the rival in beauty of any wood that grows, 
not excepting the costliest of the hard species, it being suscepti- 
ble of receiving and maintaining as high a degree of polish as any 
known wood, while, when impregnated with oil, it is almost in- 
destructible. In such a condition it is impervious to even hot 
grease and other substances that leave an ineffaceable stain upon 
white pine, maple and various other woods. 

An English company with large capital has bought the pe- 
troleum fields near Payta, in Peru, and'expects to furnish oil 
enough for the whole of South America, Australia, China and 
Japan. Immense tank ships are being built for the business. 

Professor Scheibler has invented a machine for producing 

artificial smoke on a battlefield, which, it is believed, will be of 
great value to counteract, on some occasions, the introduction of 
smokeless powder. 

The longest stone bridge in the world is that over the Rhone 

at St. Esprit. It is 2,717 feet long, and has, in all, twenty-three 
arches. It was finishedlolO a. d., having taken forty-five years to 
build. 

The five most populous cities in the world are London, 

Paris, New York, Berlin and Vienna. The Chinese cities don't 
count; no one knows how many inhabitants they have. 

Rare Curios— Japanese works of art— at Marsh's, under Palace 
Hotel. 






Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibit 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

276 Sansome Street, S. F. 
INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n.?3,033,420.31 1 Reinsurance Reserve I 251,182.68 

Assets January 1, 1890 . . 821,517.09 Capital paid up, Gold . . 300,000.00 
Surplus for policyholders 810,567.09 | Net Surplus overev'yth'g 244,884.41 

Income in 1889 J889.971.75 | Fire Losses paid in 1889 . J192.375.28 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1890. 10,359.00 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary . CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. . ..J. L. N. SHEPARD I General Agent R. H. MAGILL 

COMMERGIAl INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full • 200.000.00 

ASSETS. December 31. 1889 406,003.99 

LOSSES Paid In 18 Years (Since Organization) 2,463,080.77 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 

Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

Capital t1 ,600.000.00 

Net ivrplus 389,266. 70 

Assets January 1, 7890 1,611,557.70 

Invested in U. S 617,405.73 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

£&- General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed SI 0,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve fund (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 19,260.000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

■wim:. ^CA_ciDOisrA.iiiD. 

GENERAL AGENT, 
315 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital. 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of 8t. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000 000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable In all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street. San Francisco. 

THE PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1868. 
LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE. 

Principal Office, 418 California Street San Francisco- 

Assets, January 1st, 1890 $2,150,000.00 

Surplus 314,000.00 

Paid Policyholders In twenty years. 4,400,000.00 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco- 

COKE— CHEAPEST FUEL! 

Reduction in Price. 

Wholesale (50 bbls. or more), 80c per bbl. Retail (any quantity 

under SO bbls.), 90c. per bbl. 

AT THE WORKS OP 

THE SAN FRANCISCO GASLIGHT COMPANY, 
HOWARD AND FIRST STS., and FOOT OF SECOND STREET. 



J»n. 10, 1891. 



SAN PR VNCI8( NEM - 1 ETTF.R 




SUNBEAMS 




TBI K.nUenai courier B*J8 thai an Idaho alitor is in hiding, 
while hi* foreman i.« trying to arrange matters *<• thai h< 
one witboat (far <»f i>e»n>r pulverised* In describing the house 
j'lniic- owihi! by the wife o( a prominenl 'iii.cn he used the phrase* 
■• lira. Blank hai the preUieal plants in town," bat in making up the 
form the ** I *' In plants dropped on I and thepaper waa printed and 
distribated before the error «;i- discovered. Tin- r<iit->r saw tha irate 
husband bosUtng along the >tr»-<t with a huge blacksnake and at 
• ■i). e dropped Crom aback window, whence betook t<» the woods. The 
foreman made :i beautiful apology the week Following, but the editor 
|fl >lill at lar>;*'. 

Anna Belinda aat quietly thinking. 

And Bally Hypatia 9St reading a hook. 

When, out from a corner, with tittle eyes blinking, 
A visitor crept with a wonderful look; 

And though he ffiis timid in manner, and shrinking, 
Yet Anna Belinda cried. *' Mercy, I pray ! " 

While Sally Hypatia. not even once winking", 
Jumped over the sofa, and fainted away. 

— Qood Housekeeping. 

— — / ■■•'Journalism. — Professor— I again call your attention 

to the too Common use of trite expressions. Mr. tjuills. can you not 
find a tit substitute for the well-known phrase : " He died a natural 
death?" Mr. <fttilk (about to graduate as managing city editorial eor- 
nipondenbin-chuff— Well, sir, I suggest" He died without medical aid." 
How would that do? Professor— It is excellent, Mr. Quills. 

— Harper's Bazar. 

Put-tor— Have you and your wife now got rid of the ague? 

" No. doctor; my wife and I are still very poorly." " Did you take 
the brandy and quinine I ordered you ? " " Certainly, doctor.' 1 " Then 
the fever ought to have abated by this time. I suppose you took the 
medicine in the manner prescribed? " " I imagine so. Man and wife 
are one, aren't they? So I took the brandy, and gave my old woman 
the quinine." 

Little Georgje — Mamma, where is the World's Fair going to be 

held? Mamma— -In Chicago, dear; why? Little Georgie— Oh, nothing; 
only while I was hiding under the sofa last night I heard Charlie tell 
Grace to come over to him and he would show her where the World's 
Fair ought to be held, and I was just going to peep out and see where 
when the gas went out. — Harvard Lampoon. 

They stood before the cottage door, 

A youth and fair-faced miss, 
'Twas night, and dark, 

He asked her for a kiss. 
Though I must answer " no," said she, 

I will this statement make, 
No man should ask 

For that which he can take. Yum! Yum! 

It is a beautiful hat, Jennie. Will you wear it to the theatre 

to-night? " Wife— Certainly not. I will wear it to church first, where 
it will be seen. People don't go to the theatre to look at hats, but at 
the play. Husband— That's where you are wrong, my love. If you 
wear that hat to the theatre, those who sit behind you won't look at 
anything else. 

They were having a good gossip. " How girls change. My 

Mamie, when she was little, never would go even into the parlor at 
night without a light, because, as she put it, there might be a man 
around. And now," she added, significantly, " she won't have a light 
in it because there is a man there four or five nights a week." 

Younq Hopeful— Say, pa, you must be a pretty strong man. 

Father — Tolerably so, my son; tolerably so. What makes you think 
so? Young Hopeful — 'Cause Uncle John said he went out with you 
the other night, and you could carry the biggest load of any man he 
ever saw without showing it. 

First Anglomaniac— Just think of it, Chawles. I thaw the 

Prince of Waltne as he was going into the Victoria Hotel this m awn- 
ing. Second Anglomaniac — Weally, Gawge. And I saw him as he was 
coming out. First Anglomaniac— That is honor enough for one day. 
Let us return to our hotel. — Yankee Blade. 

Minister (to prisoner) — Ah, my man, what brought you here? 
Prisoner — Drink. Minister — Terrible I I wonder what your thoughts 
are now, in your sober moments? Prisoner— Well. I think mostly of 
what the Governor of North Carolina said to the Gov— Good day. 

— Puck. 

■^—Tailor— I really do hope you will settle this little account toj 

day, sir. I have a heavy bill to pay my cloth merchant. Captain 

(calmly)— Confound your' impudence! You go and contract debts 

and come dunning me to pay them. Go out or I'll send for the police. 

— Harper's Bazar. 

— " It's gettingquite dark now," remarked Cholly, as they sat on 
the front piazza. " Yes," she answered, with a touch of scorn as she 
survey^ the distance between them. " One might imagine you were 
afraid Si the dark." 

Judge— This verdict could not have been reached on law and 

evidence. Foreman of Jury— f$o, sir; we just used common sense. 
Judge (promptly)— Overruled and set aside. — Chkago Times. 

" There is one objection to the new tariff bill that I have not 

seen mentioned." " What is that? " "It doesn't remove the tacks 
from carpets. — Harper's Bazar. 

Temperance Worker— Will you help us to put down whisky? 

Bummer — Yes; where'll we go? 



CAPITAL 

D. J. 8T.\ 
WILLIAM J. 01 
B KAVMONYII.l.K 
GKOKGi- H. IYSuN 
J. B. LKVISON 



iisrsxr:R J A.3srcK3. 

Insurance Company. 
11.000.000. 1 ASSETS 



12.650.000. 

President. 
Vice r 

BoorOtSXy. 

Ajs't, Secretary. 
Marine Becrotary, 



Agenta In all pro mine nt localities through.. m tin- 1'iiltn] state*. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
FIEE .A-ICsTD ZMI-A-RIOSriE. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up J4O0.00O. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANS0ME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
GEORGE L. BRANDEK. CHAS. H. CUSHING, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Dire oks— D. Callaghan, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brander, E. L. >. -ldstein, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. P. Buckley, Dr. v m . Jones, G. H. Wheatou.T. McMuUiu, H. H. Watson, 

H. Dimond. P. Bols 



AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London f Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurarce Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.] 
Connecticut F're Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets- 



The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 

CAPITAL AND ASSETS. .:.... {4,694,983 00 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

ASSETS 10,581,953 00 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford. 

ASSETS 2,443,937 33 

GEO. D. DORNIN, Manager. WM. SEXTON, Assistant Manager. 

314 Sansome Street. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE GO. 



.$10,000,000. I CASH ASSETS IN U. S . . {746,186.00 



UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 



CAPITAL 

SCOTTISH 

CAPITAL {30,000.000 | CASH ASSETS {16,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

THE LANCASHIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
GEORGE STEWART, - - - General Manager. 

Guaranteed Capital $15,000,000 OO 

Assets 7,802,366 69 

All information in regard to the Company may be obtained from 
MANN & WILSON, 
General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL (6,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 316 California Street. San Francisc o. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,538.46. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




318 QMuroF/NtH. §t. 

Q)P,er fRHNCiJJCO 



CpMR/VNYC 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



MUSIC— George Norton. 

Snug in the nest the young bird liea 

Until its wings are strong, 
And then it cleaves the buoyant skies, 
Bearing, if near or far it flies, 

A message and a song. 
So fledging thoughts, unfinished things, 

Nest in the poet's head; 
But Music trains their spouting wings 
Till from the poet's brain each springs, 

And flies when he is dead! 



LIVING UP TO HIS HAT. 



TOM HARDUP, who is a Bohemian "from the word go," was 
strolling along the muddy and ill-kept streets of this city the 
other evening, when he met an old chum. "Come up to my attic, 
old boy, and have a smoke and a chat. I can't offer you 'all the 
luxuries of the season,' but I'll promise to 'rush the growler,' " 
said Tom. 

Tom's attic, as he loved to call it. was a regular bachelor's den, 
and disorder was the order of the day. Empty beer bottles fres- 
coed the floor, and a tangled mass of literary matter, consisting 
of half-finished manuscripts, clips, old papers, .etc., the table, a 
small coal-oil stove, a frying pan and three our four dirty plates, 
piled upon which were equally dirty knives and forks, showed 
that Tom sometimes indulged in domestic cookery. On the walls 
were a few dingy old chromos, which, Tom apologetically ex- 
plained, belonged to his landlady. In strange keeping with these 
surroundings was a bran new " plug hat." This, Tom had fa- 
cetiously crowned with a garland of Christmas stuff. 

When the two friends had lit their pipes and quaffed the amber 
beer, Tom pointed to the hat, and said: 

" The inconsistency of some people is beyond comprehension. 
Observe my only New Year's present. Now, what earthly use is 
that thing to me. I can't even ■ soak ' it. 

"Somehow or other I can never keep a proper balance in my 
get-up. If my hat is fairly decent, then my shoes get all out of 
gear. If these extremes are in good order and style, my coat is 
sure to be out at the elbows, or else adorned with these tell-tale 
grease streaks, which say, as plainly as words: • He's been eating 
where there are no napkins, and drinking without wiping the 
froth from his mustache.' Now, how should I look togged out 
in that dude affair," and Tom slapped the hat down on his head. 

He certainly did present a rather incongruous appearance. His 
coat was " in the sere and yellow " stage, and there was a tell- 
tale seam on one knee of his trowsers, that was unmistakably 
home-made. His shoes, too, were hardly such as Jim Fair or 
Ed Green way would wear in such sloppy weather. 

Just as Tom was in the act of replacing the despised " tile " up- 
on the nail, a little three-cornered piece of carefully folded paper 
dropped to the floor. He picked it up and remarked: " By Jove, 
I never noticed that," 

Excusing himself (for Tom was alvyays a gentleman) he opened 
the little note, and read it. As he did so he heaved a heavy sigh, 
and said, with more emphasis than he usually put into anything 
but an invitation to drink, " By thunder, I will." 

He tossed the note over to his chum. It simply read: 

"Dear Tom: Try to live and dress up to this hat. Kate." 

The growler was rushed several times that night, but it was its 
funeral, and Tom was left late on the day after New Year's firmly 
impressed with the idea of " Living up to his hat." 

San Francisco, January 10, 1891. Wm. Lovel Evke. 

THE Railway Age says: Vice President Crocker, of the Southern 
Pacific Company, is a strong believer in the physical, as well as 
moral necessity, for railway employes and all other men, of 
one day's rest in the seven, and to meet the difficulty resulting 
from the apparent necessity of keeping railways in operation 
every day, he has a plan of giving station agents in odd numbered 
towns along his line a vacation every other Sunday, alternating 
with those of even numbered districts. If it be admitted that 
Sunday labor cannot be abolished altogether, such a plan is cer- 
tainly preferable to the existing practice,*on the principle that 
half a loaf is better than no bread. 

A JEALOUS wife reversed the usual order of things, the other 
day, by potting the husband, who endeavored to send her 
across the Styx. It is pleasant to see the ladies vary the mono- 
tony of the conjugal slaughter house. This sweet thing was re- 
markably quick with her pistol, and, before her worthy husband 
had time to carry out his amiable designs, landed a leaden pill in 
his intestines. Among the rights of women none can be more 
reasonable or self-evident than the privilege of bringing down the 
fellow who wants to make them the subject matter for a coroner's 
jury. 

Ayer's Cathartic Pills stimulate the appetite and regulate the 
bowels. Try them. Have you seen Ayer's Almanac? 

Who is Mullee? The Optician true, whose skill and fcieuce waits for 
I and you. 



H. M..NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, Sin Francisco, California. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 
LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

vOver 800 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all ImpuritieB from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 
330 Pine street, San Francisco, Gal. 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for— 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

Company, (L'd.), 

" The California Line of ClipperB," I The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

from New York, Steel Rails and Track Material. 

" The Hawaiian Line of Packets," | 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, 8. 8. Hepworth's Centrl 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Co Bering. 

327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

8AN FRANCISCO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

O^" Manufacturers of Bluebtone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 

The "Standard" Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 

Chamberlin Patents. 

J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST FOR 

American Rubber Co.'s Celebrated Rubber Boots and Shoes, 

HEAVY 

Gossamery Mackintosh and Oil lothing, 

2 and 4 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IKON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OILS AND SUPPLIE8. 

THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

GIANT POWDER OK DYNAMITE, NOBEL'S GELATINE, GELATINE 

DYNAMITE of various grades, JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED, 

BLACK BLASTING POWDER, CAPS AND FUSE. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., - - - General Agents 

30 California Street. 



Arthur W. Moore. 



Harry F. Woods. 
Member Stock aod Bond Exchange. 



WOODS & MOORE, 
STOCK AND BOND BROKERS. 



Investment securities of all kinds bought and sold on commission. Lib- 
eral advances made on approved securities. Stocks carried on margin. 

No. 438 California Street, s. 1'. 



.!.,: 



BAN PR W< 



\ kws i i i ri'i: 







°-5sir 



.New Yo« Citt. January 3, 1891. 

WK bare been honored with two first nights this week, one of 
theru being, also, the occasion «>f lb* opening up of a now 
theatre. The handsome Structure that has been erected by Har- 
rigan's friends and admirer* on 84th street, was finally, After nu- 
merous delays and postponements, thrown open to the public on 
Monday evening last. A new plej by Harrigan entitled Reill;/ 
and the F-ur Hundred, rendered the atfair auspicious. No 
greater testimonial to the author-comedian's extraordinary popu- 
larity with the New York public could have been obtained, than 
was evidenced on that night by the mad rush and cruel crush out- 
side the doors. I venture to say that Adclina Tatti in her palm- 
iest days, was never more fought for than Harrigan has been, not 
only on the opening night, but every evening since. On Wednes- 
day, hoping that some of the excitement that prevented one on 
Monday from sitting in the seats to which I was justly entitled, 
might have abated, I went down to the new theatre to revel once 
more in Reiily and his quaint doings and sayings. Although the 
curtain had been up at least fifteen or twenty minutes, such a 
mass of surging, swearing and brutal humanity was never seen. 
Men and women in evening dress, with bands raised aloft holding 
tickets for seats, screamed in vain to the wall of people in front 
of them, to let them pass. The box-office was not only closed, 
but had a cordon of police around it that would have been con- 
siderably more useful elsewhere. Vieing with the yells of the dis- 
appointed seat-holders, were the hoarse voices of the ticket spec- 
ulators and kerb-stone brokers, who were busy selling admissions 
at fancy prices, which admissions were absolutely worthless, on 
account of the crowd, when obtained. My opinion of Harrigan 
— in which I don't think I am altogether alone — has always been 
that as a writer and portrayor of middle and lower class life, he is, 
in certain ways without a peer. Latterly, however, in almost 
everything new he has introduced, he has persisted in attempting 
to soar into realms in which he is of no earthly use. His pictures 
of drawing-rooms in upper swelldom are as ridiculous as his 
scenes in the monde ordinaire are perfect. This is precisely the 
matter with Reilly and the Four Hundred. The bulk of the piece, 
which deals with people and characters of the Bowery type, is 
every whit as good as anything he has ever done, but unfortu- 
nately, he will not drop the curtain on the final act without a 
scene laid in what he considers the haut monde. I want to men- 
tion one young lady in his company, who, I believe made her di- 
but on Monday evening last: Miss A.da Lewis. The role she 
played mas that of a genuine, unadulterated, unsoftened Chat- 
ham Square tough of persuasion feminine. It has never been my 
good fortune to see anything to equal the absolutely true-to-life 
delineation she gave of that extraordinary specimen of feminine 
humanity which New York alone possesses. I have since heard, 
though I do not know how authentic my information is, that 
Miss Ada Lewis hails from the Pacific Slope; in which case, it is 
difficult to understand whence she obtained her intricate knowl- 
edge of and close acquaintance with Boweryism in all its pristine 
beauty. Her versatility is still more remarkable than her char- 
acter acting, as in the last act she appears in low-neck dress and 
short sleeves, and looks, talks and acts more at home in that cos- 
tume, than any one else on the stage. 
*■ # ■* 
At Palmer's Theatre this week, Mr. E. S. Willard, the young 
English actor — of whom, I believe, I have before spoken to the 
readers of the News Letter — made his appearance in Judah, by 
Henry Arthur Jones. Judah offers Mr. Willard a r61e that is in 
striking contrast to the one he played in The Middleman. As a 
play, it can only be likened to olives, caviare, sauerkraut, or any- 
thing else that is indisputably an acquired taste. It is slow, 
sombre and depressing. It abounds with false sentiment and un- 
conscientious rectitudes, if such a paradoxical term may be used 
to express what I mean. Things that are palpably wrong ac- 
cording to all orthodox moral teachings, are made to appear right 
by dint of working upon public sympathy. Mr. Henry Arthur 
Jones is too old and skilled a playwright to turn out anything 
that could be called uninteresting, but in plunging into new and 
heretofore proscribed paths, he has come dangerously near being 
so in Judah. The story and plot being such a novel departure in 
the drama. I shall not attempt to give it, as in order to make it 
intelligible, I should have to step beyond the usual space allotted 
to me. It is not easy to discover wherein Mr. Willard has any 
extra opportunities of displaying his histrionic powers, beyond 
making manifest the fact that he can play juvenile parts as well 
as he can strong character. In Judah he is a clergyman, who 
falls in love with a girl who is a public cheat and adventuress. 
Because he is in love he is blind to her failings, until he has in- 
controvertible proof of them; because he is a clergyman, he is 
horrified at the discovery; because he is in love, he bides the 
girl's guilt and per jure's himself; because he is a clergyman, his 
conscience pricks him, and the remembrance of his deceit haunts 



him; .,-. i,, determines t-> merry the >:iri In the 

.t Lhreeteni bei Isrgy* 

men i he I nd oonfeee eTerythlng to the peopUtn 

wronged- and io || goes. on, alternating, bet* i ■ 

sentiment, until be eioN upas a very ordinary individual, who 

has done nothing particular but mnkt bl in sell nnnMesaarUy mis- 
Uomoopmthlo dose- of Ju.l.ih, under snnsthetlos, might, 
In time, produce a certain number <>( converts to this new 
drmmeUc doctrine, but a indden change would be necessarily a 
>t\ ere one. 

• • • 

l he physic tans In New York who are experimenting with the 
marvelous Koch lymph are now keeping very quiet about results. 
The reason of this is not difficult to devine — there are none, or, at 
least, none worth speaking of. The excitement and craze first 
produced are subsiding, just as they did with the Brown-Sequard 
inoculation. The year 1891 is not the age of miracles. Edison 
can make the world exclaim " My? Did you ever?" with his utili- 
zation of the earth's forces, and books can be written upon un- 
dfscussable subjects that will be nine days' wonders. Consump- 
tives with one lung and a quarter, however, will still have to con- 
sider themselves as doomed, and hopeless invalids will not be able 
to take up their beds and walk after using Dr. Koch's virus — that 
is, not in 18D1. The latest report of Professor Loornis, who has 
been to Dr. Koch's laboratory and returned, admits that the lymph 
is a discovery in the world of medicine, but omits the word " great." 
Furthermore, he calls attention to the fact that, of all inoculations, 
this one for tuberculosis is the most dangerous. If his word and 
scientific knowledge may be accepted as of criterion value, the 
lymph is something that is about as handy to have around as 
lachesis or rattlesnake poison. One death has already occurred 
which, if not caused, has certainly been greatly accelerated by its 
use, while several in Vienna and Berlin can be attributed to no 
other source. Practitioners, now, amongst, themselves, say: ( » All 
Hail! Dr. Koch. We thank you for what you have found, but 
you are not a Cagliostro nor even a Jenner? " The disappointment 
met with should not deter the German physician from prosecuting 
his researches still further. There are millions of consumptives 
who will joyously welcome anything that will prolong their lives 
a single hour. He may be on the track of his elixir vitao after 
all; or if not, he may strike it yet, but not, probably, in 1891. 

Babbles. 

UY Joseph Tetley & Co.'s "Elephant" brand of Ceylon and 
India Teas in lead packets. Unadulterated, fragrant, delicious. 



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Bakery, has only to dine there often, when the reason becomes ap- 
parent. 

In buying a new hat one needs utility, worth, practical value first 
of all, and after these so much of style as you have a mind to pay 
for; but if a union of both use and beauty is the object in view, this 
is to be found in the stock always kept at the establishment of White, 
the Hatter, 614 Commercial street. 

Sanborn, Vail & Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Portland, and Ijos -A.ng'eles. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



THE Paris correspondent of the Unify News says: A breach of 
promise case (almost unheard of in France), was tried on De- 
cember 1st at the Tribunal of Beziers, a town in the south of 
Trance, near Montpellier. A young couple were about to be united, 
the banns had been made public, cards sent out to the friends, 
and the wedding dress had received the finishing touches of the 
dressmaker. The wedding day came on and nothing more was 
wanted but the bridegroom. This indispensable man had, how- 
ever thought a second time about the marriage, and he never 
came The disappointed bride brought an action for damages 
against her too fickle suitor. The sentence of the Beziers bench 
is extremely curious. » Whereas the promise of marriage, so it 
runs "was of public notoriety, the banns were published, and 
a rude breaking off of the marriage was calculated to injure the 
bride's family; whereas the latter had been to a considerable ex- 
pense in view of the ceremony, particularly in view of the bridal 
dress and the accessories (euphemism for trousseau), the bride- 
groom is bound to compensate them, etc. The bridegroom is sen- 
tenced to $800 damages for the moral injury to the family (not to 
the bride!) and to indemnify them for the cost of the wedding 
dress and the interest on the outlay." This novel case was tried 
by a bench of magistrates, and not by a jury. 

Apropos of the late King of Holland, a story is told of his first 
wife which is worth noting. About fifteen years ago she was in 
London. A great friend of hers, a Dutch Baroness, was very ill 
at The Hague, and the Queen of Holland asked Sir Spencer Wells 
to go over and see the lady. The day after his return to London 
the Queen walked round to Upper Grosvenor street to ask after 
her friend, and the servant came into the consulting-room, saying: 
" Please, Sir, there is a lady in the waiting-room who wants to 
see you. I suppose she must be mad. She says she is the Queen 
of Holland." 

The Russian painter Nicolai, a follower of Count Tolstoi, is 
at present exhibiting in Berlin a remarkable picture called, "What 
is Truth?" It represents Christ before Pilate at the moment 
when Pilate asked Christ the above question. The picture, which 
is causing a great sensation, is of an ultra realistic type, and rep- 
resents Christ as he may be supposed to have looked at that mo- 
ment. The Savior's clothes are dirty and torn, his hair disheveled, 
and his whole appearance suggestive of the struggle He has been 
going through. Several Indies have, it is stated, alr«idy fainted 
after looking at the picture. 

The young Earl of Dalhousie, who lately celebrated his twelfth 
birthday, is the owner of an estate of 136,000 acres in Forfarshire, 
worth about £40,000 per annum. His father, who was Secretary 
for Scotland under Mr. Gladstone, is one of the few examples of 
death from a broken heart. He and his Countess were returning 
from a trip to America in November, 1887, and had reached Havre. 
The Countess, who was suffering from fever, died there on the 
24th of November, and the Earl, utterly prostrated with grief, 
took to his bed and died the next morning. 

There is a good story told of the Duke of Northumberland who, 
when he travels on the local railway, generally travels third class. 
The officials, not liking this, tried to make him give up this habit, 
so they filled his compartment with chimney-sweeps, carrying 
sacks of soot; but when the Duke arrived at his destination he 
took the sweeps to the booking office, and bought them each a 
first-class ticket back again, and put one in each first-class car- 
riage, sacks and all. After this the Company gave up trying to 
make the Duke travel first-class. 



Mrs. O'Shea, the respondent in the case of O'Sheaw. O'Sheaand 
Parnell, which has lately been decided in favor of the petitioner 
for divorce on the ground of her adultery with the "uncrowned 
King of Ireland," is the sixth daughter of the late Eev. Sir John 
Page Wood, Bart., Vicar of Cressing, Esse*, and Hector of St. 
Teter's, Cornhill, London. She is a niece of the late Lord Hath- 
erly Lord Chancellor, and a sister of the late Sir Francis Page 
Wood, of General Sir Evelyn Wood, G.C.M.G., V.C., and of Lady 
Lennard. She married Capt. O'Sbea, formerly of the 18th Hus- 
sars, and a Count of the Holy Eoman Empire, in 1867. 

The Court Journal says: Maltese terriers have hitherto been 
great pets, but sad to say, these small white dogs have gone out 
of fashion, and the very women who used to make pets of them 
are now causing them to be destroyed wholesale. It is found that 
the soft white hair is most becoming for lining evening cloaks, 
and is to be the fashionable fur this winter. Moral: Take care 
not to be a woman's pet. 

Oysters from the East and from his own beds in San Mateo county 
gout delicievse, at Moraghan's, in the California Market. 



THE DELBECK 



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THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE 





THE VfFBRUT, 

The highest grade of Champagne without 
sweetness, 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(Established 1725, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oils. 




JAMES DE FREMERY & CO., - San Francisco, 

General Agents, Pacific I'oast. 

/ETNA MINERAL WATER COMPANY 

Invites Public Attention to the Justly Celebrated 

/ETNA NATURAL MINERAL WATER, 

One of the Invaluable Resources of this Wonderful State, and chal 
lenges comparison of its demonstrated and acknowledged merits with 
those of any other Mineral Water, native or foreign. Citizens and 
families of San Francisco, who have used iETNA since.it was put on 
the market, pronounce it— either as a Beverage and Table Water, or 
as a Preserver and Restorer of Health— Superior to any other known 
Mineral Water. Leading Physicians here and throughout the State 
recommend its daily use by both sick and well. 



/Etna Mineral Water Co. 

104, 106 and 108 Drumm St., S. F. 



TELEPHONE 536. 



LOUIS SLOSS & CO., 



AGENTS FOR THE 



other well-known Brands of Alaska Canned Salmon, 

310 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 



PACIFIC TOWEL CO'^LF^-JSTST 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes C'lean Towels at the following low rates: 

6 Clean Hand Towels each week, $1.00 per month: 12 Clean Hand Towels 

each week, $1.50 per month; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.00 per 

month ; 6 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.2o per month. 



Jan 10, 1891. 



SAN KK.VN* [SCO NEW8 T ETTER. 



THS SOLID NINE AND THE UNCERTAIN TWELVE. 

TMK BolM >in* retire*, front pow«T to ft btaM ol lolphoroui 
Clury. They ■toffl t«> the lut moment of their ohVinl CXl8t*nos ( 
an<l they tritd to make their ileallng! ■*4*t*d *'v«t tin* tt-rm- "f 
thri r MMMMOfB. If they e«»ul.| have carried through tin* Bhftg 
Bock and <tarha#e johs they would have been ftbla to tide ilinn- 
I eelves through the next two bard \\ -inter*, by which time the in- w 
B.»ard might pooathlj have made a reputation that would drive 
the city back t«> the arms of the old one. 

We have had a number of scaly Boards of Supervisors. We 
• have tested every variety <>f official rottenness, but we have 
■ never yet experienced a degree of rascality quite equal to that of 
' the Solid Nine. Formerly our official reprobates were at least 
: ln»nest enough to stay bought. The body that has just disap- 
peared with a resounding plank in the bilgewater of oblivion set 
I up a new standard of rapacity, and really injured its own niar- 
I ket value, by demanding "refreshers" from its clients before 
it would carry out the arrangements for which it bad accepted 
retainers. Capitalists became shy, and hesitated to invest in a 
form of property so elusive as the Supervisorial conscience. The 
new Board has started out pretty well. It sat on Shag Rock 
and .lake Lindo at the very beginning. This was to be expected, 
of course, for there was nothing in either the rock or Lindo for 
the new administration. The test will come when the present 
Board's schemes turn up. Then we yhall see whether its virtue 
is confined to rebuking the sins of others or extends to the regu- 
lation of its own conduct. One dangerous source of demoraliza- 
tion will disappear if the Supervisors keep their pledges. There 
will be no more juggling with street railroad franchises. Ail such 
privileges are to be disposed of to the highest bidder. That has 
been the rule heretofore, but hereafter the bids are to be public 
and the money is to go to the city. There remains nothing 
of much importance except the water order and the lighting 
contracts. A thrifty set of city fathers could probably keep the 
wolf from the door with the help of these, but the chances of 
accumulating wealth will be considerably reduced. This com- 
munity is too old in experience to expect positive honesty from 
a Board of Supervisors. Sometimes, however, *« it is the unex- 
pected that happens." At the worst the pickings will go into 
new bands. We are rid of the Blind White Devil and his crew. 



Who is Muller? Don't the question ask — the best Opticiau, who knows 
well his task. 

Smoking Jackets at G. T. Marsh & Co.'s, under Palace Hotel. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is herebygiveu that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the ninth (9th) day Of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 11) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
ofhee of the Company, Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Nineteenth (19th) Day of January. 1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made'be- 
fore. will be sold on MONDAY, the ninth (9th) day of February, 1891, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. H. FISH, Secretary. 

Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the fifth day of January, 1891, an assessment (No. 42) of Twenty-five Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Tenth Day of January 1891. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the second day of March, 1891, to. pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. BARROWS, Secretary pro tern. 

Office— Room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, Caliioruia. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Dal Monte Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tusearora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the-Board of Directors, held on 
the fifth day of January, 1891, an assessment (No. i) of Twenty (20) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Ninth Day of February, 1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the third day of March, 1891, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 



''■*•«' •morula. Lo- 

cution ,.f work \ 

■ ii Hint »l r> ■ r- Hoard .if Mrcctoi 

on ih,' nth day ..( i i ireuly Ova 

i r nharo ««> levied ilpou tho capluu *t.»rk of the i 
payable Immediately in United Slate, gold colli, to Iho Secretary m 

Ineoffti f ti mpaoy, 

street, Sau Prauclicn i Hlifnrnla. 

Any itool hi which ib nut i unpaid on 

The Filtconlh Day of ianuiry. I 891. will bo delinquent. 

mid adTeitUod f->r talc al publlo auction and uoleu pay it la made bo- 

tore, will bo sold on rHURSDAY, tho fifth day ol February, 1891, 

the dellnqtionl aasossmont. ;■ -e.-t ii.-r with the coat* -,f advonlslug aud 

expenaeaol sale. Byorderol the Hoard <>f Dlrei 

CHAD 1 BXLIO i , Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. BW ttoutgomory street. SanKrau- 
Olaeo, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Ken tuck Mining Company. 

Location of principal plat I business -San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Bill, Storey County, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given thai at a meeting of the Hoard of Director held 
cm'the29tbdayof December,1890, anapsessmeul (No. 23; of Thirty-five Cents 
[35cJ per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office Ol 
the Company, No. 310 Pine street, P^oms lft aud 17, San Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessm ■ 1 1 shall remain unpaid on the 
Third Day of February 1391, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Wednesday, the tweuty-firth day of February, 1891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Piue street. Rooms 15 aud 17, San Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Consolidated Imperial Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the thirteenth day of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 30) of Five 
(ft) Cents per .share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 329 Piue street, room 3, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Sixteenth day of lanuary, 1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless paymeut is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the ninth day of February, 1891, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 

Office— No. 329 Pine street, room 3, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale & Noreross Silver Mining Company, 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia Miuiug District, Storey County, State of Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the seventh day of January, 1891, an assessment (No. 97) of Fifty Cents 
50c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of t':e Compauy, room 58, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Wednesday, ihe Eleventh day of February, 1891. will be delinquent, 
aud advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the fourth day of March, 1891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 58, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Potosi Mining Company. 



Location of principal place of business— 3au Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the sixteenth day of December, 1890, an assessment (No. 35) of Fifty (50) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francis- 
co, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Twentieth day of January, 1891. will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the tenth day of February, 1891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment .No. 08 

Amount per Share 30 Cents 

Levied January 2, 1891 

Delinquent in Office. Febrtiarv 5, 1891 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock February 24, 1891 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



26 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 10, 1891. 



SWELL APARTMENTS. 
New Artotype Series.— Plate 79.- 



A. S. Baldwin's new Van Ness Avende Building, 1415-1417 Van Ness 
Avenue, near Pine Street. 

WHAT a relief it is to see something new and original from an 
architectural standpoint. Our artotype this week shows a 
most welcome addition to our list of modern buildings. A. S. 
Baldwin, of the well-known firm of McAfee. Baldwin & Ham- 
mond, has boldly departed from the conventional style in the 
erection of his Van Ness avenue apartment building. He be- 
lieved that there was a demand for first-class flats if conveniently 
and attractively arranged, and hence sought what is recognized 
as one of the most fashionable localities in the city to demonstrate 
his belief. That his judgment is good can be seen already, for, 
notwithstanding the fact that the workmen have hardly gotten 
out of the premises, and that it is mid-winter, when people are 
loath to move, four of the six flats have been engaged by most de- 
sirable tenants. 

The casual observer may be somewhat puzzled over the arrange- 
ment of the entrance doors. It is, however, quite simple. The 
two doors on the extreme ends of the building are the entrances 
to the second floor flat. In the vestibule there are three doors, 
each of the lower flats having a separate entrance whilejthe door 
in the center leads to the third lioor apartments. At the head of 
the first flight of stairs a separate door leads to each of the flats. 
The janitor of the building attends to the stairs leading to the 
third floor, which are handsomely carpeted. He also looks after 
the back stairs of all flats and keeps the handsome marble steps 
and tile floors in the vestibule and landings in order, thus avoid- 
ing the great annoyance that occupants of apartment buildings 
have to contend with. 

The front part of this building is certainly one of the most at- 
tractive in the city, and of its kind there is nothing comparable 
to it. There is a skillful and artistic blending of the press brick, 
stone and woodwork, which leaves no room for improvement. 
The inside finish is in keeping with the outward appearance. In 
the first and second floor flats the pretty reception balls, with 
their handsome fire places and carved hardwood mantels, form a 
most attractive feature. The whole building is, in fact, complete 
in every detail, including even a .10-foot fire hose for each apart- 
ment, which can be used by any one in case of necessity, requir- 
ing merely the turning of the valve to send a stream sufficient 
to subdue a blaze of the most pretentious order. 

Mr. Baldwin has spared no expense in the plumbing. W. F. 
Wilson, the well known plumber, whose name is a synonym for 
good work, was given carte blanche and the result will certainly 
be a satisfaction to the owner and a source of comfort to the oc- 
cupants of the building. 

R. M. Murray, who is now building the Colonial Hotel, corner of 
Pine and Jones, was the contractor. His careful supervision of 
his workmen can be seen in the complete finishing of every detail. 
J. C. Newsom was the architect, 



THE NEW POUND KEEPER. 

THE management of the Public Pound will no longer be a dis- 
grace to San Francisco, as from to-day it comes under the 
direction of Mr. John Partridge, of the well-known firm of But- 
ton & Partridge, stationers, on California street. As a member 
of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Mr. 
Partridge has long struggled nobly to right the wrong, but his 
efforts have hitherto been thwarted through the power of the 
ring that has so long had its hold on the city. Past Boards of 
Supervisors have been appealed to in vain, but still Mr. Partridge 
never gave up, and principally owing to his efforts during the 
last election the Republican candidates were pledged to place the 
Pound in charge of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals and to appoint its nominee the Poundmaster. Mr. Par- 
tridge intends to adopt the scoop net instead of the cruel lariat, 
and after being taken to the pound and not claimed life will be 
taken away from the friendless animals in a quick and painless 
manner. Mr. Partridge intends to commence the new order of 
things at once, and even in the limited quarters kindness will 
take the place of the former brutal treatment. It is the inten- 
tion of Mr. Partridge to enforce the Pound laws to the very let- 
ter, and one wagon and two nets will be used at first for the 
capture, using more afterwards if necessary. The inhabitants of 
our city will have the satisfaction of knowing, now that the 
Public Pound is under the superintendence of Mr. John Partridge, 
it will be conducted in such a manner as to bring credit instead 
of the byword and reproach it has heretofore done. 

THE plumber, like a soldier, will always charge when brought 
into service. 

'Tis a lawyer's license to fabricate. 



J. F. Cotter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by al 
druggistsind first-class grocers. Trade mark— star within ashield. 



For fine shirts, neckties, gloves, hosiery, underwear, etc., of the 
best make, go to J. W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. 



, ANNUAL MEETING. 

Pajaro Valley Rail Road Company. 
The Regular Annual meeting of the stockholders ot the Pajaro Valley 
Rail Road Compauy will be held at the office of the Company, 327 Market 
street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 1 9th day of January, 1 891 , at the hour cf 1 1 o'clock, A. M., 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transferbooks will close on Thursday, January 8th, 1891, at 3 o'clock p. m, 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Crocker Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Crocker Mining 
Compauy will be held at the office of the company, 26 Nevada Block, No. 
309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the nineteenth day of January, 1891, at the hour of one o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Friday, January 16, 1891. at 3 o'clock p. m. 

NAT T. MESSER, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sierra Nevada Silver* Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 15, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 21st day of January, 1891, at the hour of 1 o"clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, the 17th day of January, 1891, at 
12 o'clock M. 

K. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
i Montgomery street, San Francisco, 



OFFiCE-Room 15, Nevada Block, 
California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular annual meetiue of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company will be held at the office of the compauy, 327 Market street, 
San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the Twenty-first day of January, 1891 , at the hour of 11 o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 10, at 12 o'clock m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company. 
Conformably to the provisions of Section One of the by-laws of this com- 
pany, the next annual meeting of stockholders will be held at its principal 
office (No. 216 Sansome street, Sau Francisco, California), at 1 o'clock, p. at., 
on MONDAY, January 19th, a. d 1891, for the election of Directors to serve 
until their successors shall be elected under the provisions of said by-laws. 
The polls will be open from 1 to 4 o'clock. 

CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 
December 10, 1890. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

San Francisco Gas Light Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco Gas Light 
Compauy will be held at the office of the compauy, at 12 o'clock m., ou 
Tuesday, the 20th day of January, 1891. 

WM. G. BARRETT, Secretary. 
Office of San Francisco Gas Light Compauy, San Francisco, January 5, 
1891. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Phelan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for post 
lively extracting teeth without pain. "Coltou Gas" has au established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all cases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
alloperatiousindentistry. 

y D R. CHARLES W. DECKER. 

SCHOLZ & .ATVIEIILXICJriE 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSERS AND WIG MAKERS, 14 Grant Avenue (over 
City of Paris), Rooms 34, 3d, 36, 37, San Francisco, Cal. Commutation Ticket 
for Hair Cutting, $3.00 worth for $2.50. Open Sundays from 9 a. m. until 1 p. 
M. Shampooing done with the latest Patent Washing and Drying Machines. 
Hair Dyeing and Bleaching also performed with care. Manufacturers of 
Human Hair Goods. Take Elevator. 

LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

CABTB BLAISTCHE." 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 
"<3-ie-A.Isri3 "VI3ST SEC," 

(BROWN LABEL) 7 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




New Ariocyp* StIm, Plat«7h* 



With S. F. New n Letter. Jwnu. r y to, l- 




BRITTON A RFY, AHTO. 



l| 4-ARCI$CI(J Rome? OF (^ALIFORniA^ 

SWELL APARTMENTS. 
A. S. BALDWIN'S New Van Nets Avenue Building, 1418-1417 Van Ness Avenue, Near Pine St. 



■a« ,< i \ 



. 10, 1*91. 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

■ IHE OONtHUE BRO«DG*UGE ROUTE." 

COMMEM IS'. BtTODAT, NOVEMBER IS. 1W0 ! 
mo until further uotlre. Boat* anil Train* will 
Itart from and amvo at tin* s.n Fnoolaao Pm* 
•»n«or Prpol. MAKKE1 S1KKK1 WHARF, u 

Fro* Kan Frincitco lor Polnl Tiburon and San Rafael. 
mi PAYS -7 « a. *.. » .11 > « , u .\> a. «.: 

S JO r . » . V • r. ». 

SATURDAYS OSLY— An extra trip al 1.10 r.M. 
SUNDAYS— >i»i.ll..iJ0i.»„ 11:110 » .«.; ! 03 r.M. 

6:00 r. M . 8 1 • I y 

From San Ralael lor San Francisco. 
•rXBS l'AYS-f. ■ a m . : • . a. m., 9:S0 A M. 

U l ■■ i y . I i" i n ,5:06 r.». 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An . xlra lrl(. at 6:30 r.M. 
BUKDAYS— SJO . M..940 a.m.. 12:16 p. m: 3:40 r.M. 

6:00 r. m.. 8 i'< r. m. 

From Point Tiburon lor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAY9-OX50 a.m.. 8:20 a.m., Uma.m.: 1:10 

r. M., «:<& P. M.. 5:30 r. M. 

Saturday* ouly au extra trip at 0:55 p m 
SUN D A YS— S:35 A.M., 10.05 a.m.. 12:t0 P.M.: 

406 P.M.. 5:80 r.M.. 6:50 p. m. 



LiatiS. F. 



Week 
Days. 



Sundays 



DESTINATION 



7:40a.m. 3:00a.m. Petaluma 
3:30P.M. j»:30a. M. and 

5:00 p.m. 5:00 p. m. Santa Rosa. 



Arrive in S.F. 



Sundays! £eek 



10:40 A. H 
G OG i'.m 
7:25 P. ll 



8:50a.m. 
10:30 a.m 

fi :05 p.m. 



7:40 a.m. 
3:30p.m. 



8:00a.M. 



Fulton 

Windsor. 
Healdsburg, 
lilton Sjtrines, 7:25 p. 

Cloverdale & . 

Way Stations. 



1 10:30 a.m 
.! 6:03p.m 



7:40a. m. 8:00 a.m. 



Hopland 
and Tkiah. 



7:40a.m. 8:00a.m. Guerneville. 1 
3:30 p.M ; ... .. j 



,25p.m. 10:30a.M 
|6.05p.M. 



7:40 a. M. 8:O0a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 5:00 p. m 



Sonoma and 10:40a.m. I8:50a.m. 
Glen Ellen. 6:05p.m. |6:05 p. m. 



7:40 a.m j 8:C0a.m I o phfLitnnnl I 10:40 a.m I 10:30 am 
3:30P.M |5:O0p M | bet,astopo1 I 6:05p.mI 6:05 pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
Willits, Cahto, Capella, Potter Valley, Sherwood 
Valley, and Mendocino City, Hydesville, Eureka, 
Booneville aud Greenwood. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, $2 25: to 
Healdsburg, ^3 40; to Litton Springs, ?3.60: to Clo- 
verdale, $4.50; to Hopland, $5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75; 
to Guerneville, $3.75: to Sonoma, $1.50; to Glen 
Ellen. $1.80. 

EXC URSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, ?2.25: to Litton Springs, $2.40; to Cloverdale, 
$3; to Ukiah, $4,50; to Hopland, $3.80 to Sebasto- 
pol, $1.80; to Guerneville. $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; 
to Glen Ellen, $1.2U. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New ontgomery Street 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 

For New York via Panama, 

S. S. "City of New York" Tuesday, Jan. 13, 1891, 

at 12 O'CLOCK NOON, 

Taking freigbt and passengers direct for— 

MAZATLAN, 

SAN BLAS, 

MANZAN1LLO, 

ACAPULCO, 

GHAMPERICO, 

SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, 

LA LIBERTAD, 

PUNTA ARENAS, 
— AND — 

PANAMA, 
And via Acapulco for all lower Mexican and Cen- 
tral American ports. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama. 

S. 8. City of Peking, . . Saturday, Jan. 10th, 1891, 

at 3 o'clock p. m. 
S. S. City of Rio de Janeiro, Ttesday.Feb 3,1891, 

at3 o'clock p. m., 
8. S. China, Thursday, Feb. 26th, 

at 3 o'clock p. m. 

Round-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 

reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. 
Branch Office, 202 Front street. 

W. R. A. JOHNSON, 

Acting General Agent. 
George H. Rice, Traffic Manager. 
N. B.— Note change in hour of sailing of China 
Line Steamers. 



SAN Y\\ INCTSCO NEWS I ETTER. 



A TOAST. 
I till ihla cop 

T-' on* mmlc up 

Of all tho womanly graces; 
With form inosl fair. 
Beautiful hair. 

And the iwtetest ■■( taniata faces. 

Her lovely ■ 
l.ikc tropic ikfeai 

Smile ">n me In their gladness; 
May naught severe 
E'er bring a tear 

To shadow them with sadness. 

Her face so pure 
In each contour, 

Is heavenly in its beauty; 
My heart is taught 
In secret thought 

To love her is its duty. 

From ruby lips 
To finger tips 

She's made of mortal blisses; 
Angels above 
Who worship love 

Would languish for her kisses. 

I quaff this cup 
To one made up 

Of grace found in no other; 
In whose true eyes 
God's own love lies — 

I drink it to my mother. 



i ' \A7 HISTLING for hi3 pay" will no longer 
W be an appropriate expression for not 
getting it. Mrs. Shaw, the beautiful Amer- 
ican whistler, is rapidly making a fortune 
in Europe. She "whistles for her pay," and 
big pay, too. 

WIFE (looking up from a book) — What do 
.you think of this? In the time of the 
Ptolemies a wife was always given full control 
of her husband's property. Husband— Y-e-s; 
but in those days the fashions never changed. 

WILL O. WHEELER Patti Rosa's « live " 
business manager, is not, as his name 
might suggest, either a wooden man or a 
baby carriage. 



OCEAfJ/J STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Maile. 

Will leave the Compauy's Wharf— Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company Wharf, 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer, 

Mariposa Monday, January 1?, 1891, at 3 p. m. 

Or immediately on arrival of the British mail. 

For Honolulu Only, 

S. S. Acstp.ai.ia (3C0O tons), Jan. 27, 1891, at 2 P. M. 
For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. ^^ ^ SPRECKBLS & BROS., 
General Agents. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers CITY OF PUEBLA .WALLA. 
WALLA aud UMATILLA, direct for VICIORIA, 
B C, aud PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 A. M. every 
five days. „ , , , 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Townsend with steamers 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Huhneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARC ATA aud HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer CORONO, every Weduesday, 

a For' POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 P. m. 

Ticket office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



27 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave and nro Due to Arrive at 
SAN FIUNCISCO; 

LiAVB | From Oe'.tmber IS. 1890 1 arrive 

*! (ftp. 

7.1.'. v. 



n.i\ (Tarda, Mllei and San Joi e 
7-soa. 3Mimm'toa Redding, rUDavli 
7:80 a. Haooad ClaaiforOiTaoQaad Bait, 
Hii'i fir.-t olan locally 

•4:00a. Marlines, VallOJO ami ChIjh.oka 

•8 >»' \. El Verauo and Santa Etosa 

Kilos, Ban Joao. Btookton, tone, 
Baoramonto, StarynviTle, Oro* 
rllleand Red Biu'tr 
9:00a. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Baker.sfleld, Mnjnve and East, 
Banta Barbara & Loa Angeles. 
1200m, Haywards, NUes aud Livermore 

•1:00 p. Sacramento River Steamers 

S:00 P. Haywards, NUes aud Sau Jose . 

4 .00 p. SuuHCt Route, Atlantic Express, 

Santa Barbara, Lor Augeles, 

Demi ng, El Paso, New Orleans 

and East 

4:00 p. Martinez Vallejo, aud Caliatoga 
4:00 p. El Vcrauo and Santa Rosa ... . 

4 :00 p. Lathrop and Stockton. 

4:30p. Sacramento aud Knight's Laud- 
ing via Davis . 

•4:30 p. Niles aud Livermore 

•4:30 p. Nilesaud Sau Jose 

.. NUes aud Sau Jose 

6:00 p. Haywards, Niles aud San Jose.. 
7:00 p. Central Atlantic Express, Ogden 

and East 

17 P. Vallejo — 

9:U0 P. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Souud aud East. . 



8:46 a. 



10:15 a. 

7 :46 P. 

**6:00a. 

9:45 a. 



8:45 p. 

9:45A. 
•9.45 a. 
10:15 a. 

10:15 a. 
*8:45a. 
*7:45 p. 
JH:15 p. 
7:45 a. 

12:15 ]-. 

+8:45 p. 



Santa Cruz Division. 



8:15a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 5 :50 p. 

*2 :15 p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz *11:20a. 

4:15 p. Centerville, Sau Jose and Los 

Gatos 9:50a. 

+11:45 p. "Hunters' aud Theatre" Train to 

Newark, Sau Jose & Los Gatos. . - J8 05p. 

Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 

8:30a. San Jose, Almaden, Gilroy, Tres 
Pinos.Pajaro.SautaCruz, Mon- 
terey, Pacific Grove, Saliuas, 
Soledad, San Miguel, Paso Ro- 
bles and Santa Margarita (San 
Luis Obispo) aud principal 

Way3titions 6:30 p. 

10:3Pa. San Jose, and Way Stations.. 300p. 

11:20 A. Cemetery and Sau Mateo 1:39 p. 

12:30 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 5 :05 P. 

*3:30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
and principal Way Stations. . .*10:05a. 
*4:20p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *7:56a. 

5 -.20 P. San Jose and Way Stations 9 :03 A: 

6 :30 p. Menlo Park aud Way Stations ... 6 :35 a. 
+11:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations +7:30 p. 

p. for Afternoon. 
+Saturdays only. 
^Sundays only. 



a. for Morning. 
♦Sundays excepted. 
**Mondays excepted^ 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOB JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer 1891 

Oceanic Thursday, January 22. 

Gaelic Saturday, February 14. 

Brlgic Tuesday, March 10. 

Oceanic Thursday, April 2. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H. RICE. Traffic Manager. 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Santa I't- Koute. 

Trill. I* I>ave and Arrive at Sau Fraucteoo 

(Market Street Ferry). 

Leave Daily. I From June 15, 1890. Arrive Daily. 



9:00 A. M. 
4:00 p. M.. 



Past Express via Mojuve. 

Atliiiiiii; Express via Las 

Angeles. 



8:45 P. M. 
10:15 A. M. 



Ticket Office— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building, 
San Francisco. W. A. BISSELL, 

General Passenger Agent 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Jan. 10, 1891. 



FROM Mr Joseph Chamberlain's speech before the Birmingham 
Liberal Unionist Association, it evidently occurs to him that 
since the split in the Home Rule ranks, there will come the op- 
portunity for the formation of a new National party, and possibly 
with himself at the head. The main interest of the remarkable 
historical episode which has so rudely shaken to pieces the Home 
Kule party and has entirely changed the aspect of English poli- 
tics, at present not so much in Ireland as in England where 
everyone is considering the serious question of the form which 
the readjustment of parties, necessitated by the collapse of Home 
Rule, is likely to take. Notwithstanding the collapse, Mr Glad- 
stone still declared Home Rule to be the question of the day but 
the result of the Bassetlaw election will probably cause Mr Glad- 
stone to change his mind. This bye-election has been recognized 
at once as having a real political significance. The flowing tide 
had ceased to run for a policy discredited and made impossible 
by the proceedings which followed on the disclosures in the 
Divorce Court. In his speech at Birmingham, Mr. Chamberlain 
stated that some of his old Radical friends had been mging him 
to bring about a re-union on the old Liberal lines. But he pointed 
out that the old lines have been lost; that the new power which 
has arisen to great influence under the Gladstonian .-egis is an- 
archic and nihilistic; that true Liberalism can have no more to 
do with these extremists, and he made the important suggestion 
that a new National party should be formed of the moderate men 
from all sides. This practically means the fall of Mr. Gladstone 
who has staked his authority and his right to the leadership on 

h» 8 w V S i S of a eause which ali reasonable men now recognize to 
be lost at least for a generation. 

The chief measure of the next session of the French Parlia- 
ment will be the Tariff bill and fresh indications have lately been 
given of the Protectionist spirit which is likely to govern the de- 
hfTs'Tp A »« P™«esting so loudly against the McKinley bill 
thelanff Committee has agreed to the amendments made by a 
sub-committee for increasing the duties proposed by the govern- 
ment on machinery, pins, needles, pens and other iron and steel 
goods, thus apparently imitating the McKinley bill This ha, 
brought out a manifesto from the "League for. the defense of the 
Commerce of Bordeaux" in favor of Free Trade. It sets forth 

of fZZ\ h 'fr" 06 ° f the great "'""ficturers of the north 
of France and of the growers and producers of beet-root sugar 
he French Parliament has entered upon a course which is no 
that of protection but of prohibition. If the Parliament's 
schemes are carried out, the memorialists assert that they will 
surround France with a Chinese wall, that the economical conse 
quences will be most disastrous not to mention the political con- 
sequences which may be worse. i-uiii.ii.iu con 

There is an outcry also being~ra7sed in France against monster 
"™«u Snd HnanC , ial h0 " Ses monopolizing business LaTeZ 

The w,i „ ," T K l e t0 thiS etfect ^ M ' Gustav * Rouanet! 

The writer contends that the vital energy of France is being ex 
hausted, and that this is due to the capitalists who absorb the 
savings of the French people and use them for the deve „, 
French er , I" • ^ leading Pans ^P^lists are Jewish, not 
their hi h SO JT d ° Zen ° f ,he,u h0,d France in the ^llow of 
France of t-h" 6 " g "*\ h ° USeS 0o " lro1 the wh eat trade of 
fnu onlV wo Rr 5? ar f e f , forei .g"' three of doubtful nationality 
and only two French; of the six foreign houses three are Ger- 
man. As a result of this wheat monopoly with its consequent 
speculation Pans says the writer, has been almost on the ," 

' 7 e '„ A ' the end ° f A "g"'^ last there were only two ot 
three days food supply within Paris, and if war had broken out 
the great city would have been given over to famine. 

,h I h n h Ue f f ° r g u d J" the La '~f Ophir-or what is said to be 
he Ophir from which the gold in Solomon's temple was supplied 
appears to be very actively pushed on by British prospers in 
Mashonaland and Manicaland. It is the aim sacra fames which 

EngSld Portia, d " t r, hanCe , ° f Pe * ef "' -la.io'ns beUve^n 
2? f nd Port "Sal, and to embitter these relations still more 
another awkward incident has recently occurred, which is a 
nor,t°YV M th l PO T Ssion of Manica, » tableland lying to the 
northeast of Mashonaland. In the proposed Anglo-Portuguese 

MneTas", t „ /, laS , t AU 5 USt ' '° r so ™ reas °" " r other 8 he bou.fdary 
he Saw Th 7 r de j" eC V t0 the west ward, so as to come down 
the Sabi. This is stated to have arisen from the imperfect nature 
of the map in the English Foreign Office. However^hat may be 
on a reconsideration of the arrangement, the line will be drawn 



OBITUARY. 

D R on T Monn* R f G f N f S K BURGiRThe well-known physician, died 
U on Monday last at his home, 1432 Geary street. He was born 
in Bavaria and studied at the Universities of Munich an7 Wars 
burg, where he completed his studies in medicine. He came to 
Soon^fT "V 1850 ' ? nd , S °° n ""»de aname as a clever physlian 

wasit,h e e?; 3arnVa ' be , eStabli3hed the German Hospital, and 
was its head physician for twenty-five years. He was an honor- 

cZT m ^ 0l ^ e San Franci ^o Polyclinic, a member of the 
County Medical Society, the Society of German Physicians he 

of wMniT and f ° ne ° f the f ° UnderS 0f the San Francisco VereYn! 
of which he was for many years President. The deceased leaves 

GehdernTan nrs 6 , s r on3 . and 'hree daughters ; Mrs. HelmrichMrs 

^S^etbu"^ Ar ' hUr ' ^ ^ **•»■>»»*« a "d 




"Hello! Hello 1 1 Hello!!!" 
"Well; what is it?" 
" How is your mother, this morning ? " 
• Very much better; she had a real restful 
sleep last night : she is almost rid of her night- 
sweats, cough and nervousness, and is grow- 
ing quite cheerful. How grateful we all are 
to you for that bottle of medicine." 

Don't speak of gratitude. What does the 
doctor say? 

"He says he never saw so wonderful a 
change in such a serious lung trouble. He 
still thinks we are giving his medicines. I 
don t like to tell hira." 

"That's right. He's an old friend, you 
know. I m sure your mother will get well 
now; but you won't forget the name of the 
medicine, will you ? " 

"Never I Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Dis- 
covery are household words already, and it 
has come to stay. Do come and see what sun- 
shine it has brought already, and let us thank 
you again for it." 
" I will. Good bye." 

The foregoing is a fair representation of a 
very common occurrence. "Golden Medical 
Discovery" has cured severe, lingering coughs 
and arrested Consumption, or Lung-scrofula, 
m thousands of cases after doctors have failed 
and other medicines have been tried and aban- 
doned as useless. The " Discovery " is guar- 
anteed to benefit or cure in every case if 
te ,, e ? in time ana given a fair trial, or money 
will oe refunded. 

DR. SACE'S CATARRH REMEDY 

cures the worst cases, no matter of how long 
standing. 50 cents, by druggists. 



LIFE IN CALIFORNIA, 

BY ALFRED ROBINSON, 
JUST PUBLISHED BY 

WILLIAM DOXEY, 

Importer of New and Rare Books, 
Under Palace Hotel, San Franeiseo. 



JOHN H. DICKINSON, 

Attorney and. Counselor at La-^r, 
No. 402 Montgomery street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Reference— Bank of California. San Francisco. 




Mills' College for Young Women. 

The next Term begins WEDNESDAY, January 7, 1891. 
For information address 

Mrs. C. T. MILLI, 
Mills' College Postoffice, California. 




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Vol- Xtll. tk# r **^ 0, *0* Humhtr B. 

Nevts Better 

^California ACibcrtiscv. 

DlVOTKO TO THE Lt*0'NO INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Printed and /*»'•/«> - Sjf Utt rYofirieiOT, PrbdKRICK 

M uuui it. / . ■ -i }'■ i FVom- 

cik-o. Annual Subscription, including I'ortagr, UniUd Stole* and 
Ottnatln. M; 6 month.'. |3 50; :i mon/A.t, $1 80; Foreign^ 95; 

6 monIAj, $3; 3 mon(^ , fl ■■", ___ 

SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY ', JANUARY ; . U 
TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



LliDlsr, Articled : Paoi 

OOf I'ailv Brcft") 1 
An Avalanche of Cioeh Bills 
Lower California as a > 

Homo 2 

A Hint to Oar Wine ftfaken -j 

The Plutocratic Conspiracy. ,; 

Indec«ut PICtlOD 2 

How Ea-y II I- ... 3 

Oar Department of Agriculture 

Stirring :i 

Silly War Talk 

The" .Storoi Sigual Flying . . :? 

Society . . 4 

"The Hole in the Well " 4 

Womcu aud the Medical School 

of the Jonas Hopkins University "> 
Pleasure's Wand . .. 6 

Flea»ure"> Wand {continued) 7 

Fighting for the ^hippiugriubsidy 

B.lls . .. " 

A State Appropriation for the 

World's Fair 

Timber Conservation aud Cy- 
clones. 

Shots From the Mitrailleuse . 
Sparks 



I 



Paqb 

The Railroads U 

• 1^ 

li.itham Gossip 13 

New dear's al the Reservation... 14 

Vaulttea -15 

Financial Review 16 

Town Crier --17 

" Biz"— Summary of the Markets. 18 

The Rose Jar 19 

Real Property 20 

The Bourse aud Underwriter. . 21 

Seieatiflcand Useful. 21 

buubeams 23 

The Co/f on the Royal Ball 24 

The Hypocrite aud the Cat 26 

Obituary 25 

Potheen (P.ietry) 2:'> 

Dangers of the Street 25 

(i..i into the Courts. . . 25 

Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Report of 

Precious Metals .. .20-27 

Cream of the Humorous Press — 28 

Library Table 30 

World, Flesh aud Devil 31 

Comments on Foreign Affairs ... 32 
Egypt and Palestine 32 



OUR DAILY BREAD. 



OUR daily bread means much more than the wheaten Hour we 
consume. It includes all that we use to sustain life — liquids 
as well as solids. It is well for the human stomach that man is 
not gifted with a microscopic eye. If he could but see all that 
enters his mouth three thousand limes enlarged, what a revolting 
sense he would experience to be sure! But that is no reason why 
somebody with a microscope should not be employed to do for us 
that which we are wisely not easily able to do for ourselves. In 
short, the greatest good of the greatest number requires that our 
food should be subjected to a rigid inspection to the end that we 
may have some guarantee that it is reasonably pure. They regu- 
late these things better in some places we know. The examina- 
tion of the people's food with a view to detect and punish the 
sellers of short-weight and added impurities, is now one of the es- 
tablished functions of local governments in all well regulated mu- 
nicipalities. Just why we do not better manage these in San 
Francisco is hard to tell. We legislate upon almost every subject 
under the sun except the one thing which most nearly concerns 
the pocket, and, it. may be, the health of every member of the 
commonwealth. The neglect in regard to this vital matter can- 
not truly be said to arise from any well-founded confidence that 
our purveyors of meat and drink are honest beyond the rest of 
the world. As a matter of fact, the frauds in weight and cheats 
by adulteration practiced in this city are of a most pronounced 
character. We are not speaking at random when we say so. The 
News Letter long ago demonstrated by actual examination and 
analysis the truth of that which it alleges. There can be no 
manner of doubt that this subject calls for practical legislation. 
Our law makers at Sacramento are fathering all sorts of measures, 
good, bad and indifferent. Too many members are occupying 
time with bills not intended to pass, but to be dropped so soon as 
they have effected their cinching purpose. Other and fewer mem- 
bers are anxious to devise measures that will redound to their 
credit and increase their popularity. To the latter, legislation 
providing for pure food and honest weight presents a field well 
worth working over. The details of measures necessary to that. 
end would, no doubt, involve considerable labor and skill. But 
there is no necessity to be original in framing the necessary laws. 
The subject has been threshed out over and over again. In many 
of our Eastern cities, as well as in most continental countries, the 
statute books contain enactments relating to the matter we are 
discussing, that might be copied here with signal advantage to 
everybody who eats and drinks; and that about includes the 
whole community. Clearly, there is name and fame to be won in 
fathering such legislation. 



AN AVALANCHE OF CINCH BILLS. 

Oil: tiiiirti vaunted reform Lcgf alatore " i> bent upon follow- 
ing the evil wnyt hi Its predecessors In Ibe matter of olnofa 
bills. The Instant each boose vm organized and ready for basi- 
nets ths avalanche of bflli with •■ money in them/' was let loos©, 
and almost imried tin- clerks oul ol sight The Government 
printing office, running night and day, will not overtake the work 
alread] In band for two or three weeks to come. Kach recurring 
Bitting has <<u)y seemed to Increase tin- number ol such bills. On 
Tuesday laal there were no fewer, than L85 lull* Introduced In the 
Senate alone, and ■■ still they come." As a rule, the measures 
which become laws are drafted very loosely. Not so, however, 
with the bills designed to call oat bnsh money. These are almost 
invariably marvels of the draughtsman's skill. No escape for the 
individual or corporation to he cinched h rendered possible. The 
cleverness displayed is something phenomenal, and not to be un- 
derstood by the average onlooker. The intended victim, how- 
ever. Knows only too well where the cinch conies in, and is, per- 
force, compelled to groan in spirit at thoughts of its thoroughness. 
Some astute fellow, generally a lawyer, with as little principle as 
professional practice, usually designs the cinch bill. He would 
not care to acknowledge his workmanship, and has no need to. 
He finds no difficulty in running across members in search of such 
bills. For weeks before going to Sacramento, the newly-elected 
member is in quest of the latest and best cinch. He accepts the 
bill, fathers it, and presses its passage with zeal until somebody 
is heard from. Terms are made, and the cinch bill is allowed to 
sleep a sleep that knows no awakening. It may, and not infre- 
quently does happen, that it is a good bill, called for by the pub- 
lic interest, and sustained by honest support. So much the better 
for the cincher. He has come into possession of a bill that there 
is danger of passing. The persons interested are alarmed at the 
outlook, and "come down " liberally. The members honestly in 
favor of the measure do not notice for some time that it is slum- 
bering, and when they do, it is generally too late to wrest it from 
the control of the member who has it in charge. It is a mistake 
to suppose that cinch bills are always bad bills. The contrary is 
frequently true. The better, the stronger and the more popular 
the measure, the more effectually it serves cinch purposes if the 
member in whose hands it is feelsinclined that way. It is a marvel 
that this infamous condition of things has been tolerated so long. 
If the daily press would but apply its boasted "enterprise" to the 
abating of the nuisance, the evil would not be long in yielding to 
treatment. The thing to do is to look out for the member for 
cinch, discover him, name him, and render him odious to the 
community he betrays and dishonors. That is an easy enough 
thing to do. The correspondents at the Capitol know him and all 
his ways, and could squelch him within the first two weeks of a 
session if they were only let loose to accomplish that very desir- 
able end. 

The game would certainly be worth the candle. Already pretty 
nearly every interest in the stake is menaced. Thousands of 
stockholders in useful public enterprises are being assailed. Mil- 
lions of capital employed in schemes that necessarily promote 
the public good are threatened. Why should this condition of 
things be tolerated when the press has the power to abolish it? 
Has the hand of capital lost its cunning to an extent that inca- 
pacitates it to protect itself? If not, why is not somebody made 
to realize that from a press to which much is given, something in 
return is expected? A word to the wise would suffice. This bi- 
ennial process of cinching every man who invests a dollar in a 
public company ought to cease right now, whilst the spirit and 
temper of reform are promised respectful attention. Unhappily, 
the indications at present point to a worse condition of legislative 
iniquity than ever. That fact is only too well attested by the 
long list of cinch bills that has already seen the light. All the 
old cinches have been reproduced, and many new ones invented. 
The cable roads this year are coming in for special attention. 
The trip all the way to the Cliff House is to be made for a single 
fare. A percentage of earnings is to be demanded from roads 
whose franchises do not call for it, and without regard to whether 
or not such roads are earning a reasonable interest upon their 
capital. Harassing conditions of all kinds are to be imposed, un- 
til one is almost inclined to wonder if it will not finally be made 
a crime to hold stock in a cable road. All this in the face of the 
fact that those roads have rendered San Francisco an incalculable 
service, and that the building of miles of road more in certain lo- 
calities is yet a matter to be encouraged in every way possible. 
The Gas Companies are to furnish gas at one dollar a thousand 
feet, and no matter what the cost of coal, that price is to remain 
unalterable until the Legislature sees fit to decree otherwise. 
Meanwhile all power in the premises is taken away from the Su- 
pervisors. Despite the keen competition that exists between the 
different insurance companies, their rates are proposed to be re- 
duced and fixed by law. The Savings Banks are to be rendered 
amenable to a host of restrictions, the exact nature and purpose 
of which do not yet clearly appear. And so it goes all along the 
line. Nothing seems too great or too small for cinch members to 
assail. Even the women folks, who '* tell fortunes by cards," are 
expected to " see a man " with a bill. We say again that this 
infamy can and ought to be suppressed by an enterprising daily 
press. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



LOWER CALIFORNIA AS A NEURO HOME. 

A UNIQUE and somewhat startling proposition was broached 
this week by Senator Teller, at Washington— startling inso- 
much as it shows what class of schemes it is considered perfectly 
proper for our Congressional representatives to father and en- 
dorse. This scheme contemplates the appropriation of the modest 
sum of $50,000,000 for the purpose of enabling a negro colony 
to emigrate to and settle in Lower California, said suih to be 
bonded for a period of forty years at a low rate of interest, by 
which time the promoters of the scheme presume the colony 
will be able to refund the debt. The matter began with a peti- 
tion to Congress complaining of the injustice to which our negro 
population is subject under existing social conditions and laws, 
and asserting that the only way out of the difficulty is to give 
the negro population an opportunity to form an independent and 
self-supporting colony for itself, where its members may be at 
liberty to acquire wealth and work out their own social and polit- 
ical salvation in their own way. The scheme is so visionary and 
Utopian in character that it leads one to doubt either the sanity 
of its projectors or the accuracy of the report as to the condi- 
tions under which it is proposed to found the colony in question. 
In the first place Lower California cannot be appropriated and 
colonized in the off-hand and wholesale way which the origina- 
tors of the scheme evidently have a childlike confidence in their 
ability to perform. The Mexican Government has something 
to say on the matter, and might possibly object to an Ethiopian 
influx of the dimensions which such a movement might assume. 
In the second place it is a very grave and still a most doubtful 
question whether the arid, barren and sparsely settled penin- 
sula, stretching from San Diego to Cape San Lucas, could sup- 
port, much less provide comfortable homes and the increased 
wealth aimed at, for a great colony such as an expenditure of 
$50,000,000 would necessarily imply. Scheme upon scheme has 
been originated during the past twenty years for the appropria- 
tion and colonization of Lower California by adventurer after 
adventurer. Gold mines, pearl fisheries, cattle ranches, and what 
not have been sprung upon the unwary all over that delectable 
region. Every one remembers the outcome of the Magdalena 
Bay excitement. The Topolobampo farce, though enacted on the 
Mexican mainland at the other side of the gulf of California, was 
played upon land in most respects similar to that of the penin- 
sula. Cynical persons might hint that there is a nigger in the 
fence — no pun meant — in the present proposition, and that some- 
one interested in working off lands in the barren peninsula, has got 
to the ear of the confiding Washington negro preachers and others 
who are moving in the matter, and by specious representations 
has induced them to believe that Lower California is a land flow- 
ing with milk and honey, in short the Promised Land for the 
oppressed Ethiopian race. Once let such an idea become imbued 
in the negro mind, its volatile and enthusiastic character is such, 
as has been repeatedly shown in similar movements in the past, 
that the exodus would not stop till most of the five millions of 
the race upon the continent took part in it. What untold misery 
might result from such a movement as the wholesale deportation 
of a race not yet proved capable of self-government to an inhos- 
pitable region, the soil of which has not yet been shown to be 
capable of supporting its inhabitants by agricultural pursuits, it 
is not necessary to contemplate. There never will be a Congress 
of the United States silly enough to entertain such a proposition 
as that of Senator Teller. 

A HINT TO OUR WINE-MAKERS. 

A SUGGESTIVE and instructive report has just arrived from 
our consular representative at Bordeaux, which may be of 
much value to the wine manufacturers of this State. The report 
is brimful of statistics and will well repay a perusal in extenso, 
space alone forbidding us from doing more than present our 
readers with the significant general facts. We find first that 
France imports annually as much wine as all the other nations 
of the earth put together, and that while her exports last year 
amounted to less than 50,000,000 galluns, her imports during the 
same period aggregated nearly 225,000,000 gallons. Of these im- 
ports 170,000,000 gallons came from Spain and Portugal, 35,000,000 
from Algeria, and less than 20,000,000 from all other countries 
put together. In addition to this the wine crop of France for 
1889 was over 511,000,000 gallons, thus *oaking the total con- 
sumption upwards of 735,000,000 gallons, less the 47,000,000 gallons 
exported. Of this amount the United States received and re- 
ceives annually about 2,000,000 gallons more than any other 
country, in the matter of high-class wines, such as Champagne 
and Burgundy, while our importations of claret were small, 
being only one fourth of those of the Argentine Republic, which 
heads the list and only half those of England. Such figures as 
these put a very new aspect upon what is generally supposed 
to be the condition of the French wine question, and opens up a 
new field for California possibilities and fresh encouragement for 
our wine-makers. Our wines ought to be able even now to com- 
pete with the earthy-flavored Algerian and the turbid Portuguese 
product, if not with the better vintages of Spain, and it seems as 
if there ought to be room for more of our California pipes upon 
the quays of Bordeaux. 



THE PLUTOCRATIC CONSPIRACY. 

THE most remarkable thing about the late election was not 
the revolutionary result of the vote, but the extraordinary 
methods that have been resorted to in the effort to nullify the 
popular decision. In our balanced system of Government it 
takes some time, even when all the proceedings are perfectly 
fair, for an impulse from the people to transmit itself to every 
part of the National machine. In the present instance the 
desperate gamesters in power at Washington have piled one swindle 
on top of another to prevent the National majority from having 
its way. When the term of the present Congress began the 
Senate had a Republican majority of two. Seven of the Re- 
publican Senators — those from Connecticut, Rhode Island, New 
York and Delaware — represented Democratic States. The one 
from Delaware was lost to the Democrats through their own 
folly; the six seats from the other S'ates had been stolen through 
fraudulent apportionments and one-sided restrictions on suf- 
frage. This was merely a foretaste of what was to come. The 
four new States of Washington, Montana, North and South Da- 
kota had been admitted for the purpose of electing eight new 
Republican Senators. Montana had the temerity to elect a 
Democratic Legislature. This was not what it had been created 
for, and the slip was promptly corrected by ignoring the Demo- 
cratic Senators elect and admitting two Republicans. Then two 
more States were let in, which fulfilled the object of their being 
by electing four Republican Senators. Here were twelve Re- 
publican Senators from new States, and it seemed as if the party 
control of the Upper House were certainly secured for the rest of 
the century. But last fall's elections proved that it was not, 
and it became necessary to steal some more seats. A Democratic 
majority had been elected to the New Hampshire Legislature. 
It was counted out by a clerk appointed for that special pur- 
pose. The Democratic State officers elected in Connecticut were 
kept out of their places because they might be dangerous here- 
after. The Democrats carried Illinois by a majority of 30,000 on 
the Legislative ticket, but the returns were so manipulated that 
the balance of power was held by three Farmers' representatives, 
who have since been induced to refuse to support the Demo- 
cratic candidate for the Senatorship. In Kansas the Alliance 
carried the Assembly by a three-fourths majority against Ingalls, 
but that foxy manipulator has been steadily at work corrupting 
the members elect, and boasts that he has secured all he needs. 
So far the only States in which the Democrats are reasonably 
sure of making Senatorial gains as the result of their victory 
are New York and Wisconsin. The Plutocracy is sitting on the 
National safety-valve. Sooner or later there may be an explosion. 

INDECENT FICTION. 

IT is hard to understand what kind of a demon of eroticism and 
concupiscence has entered into and taken possession of the 
American people within the past few years. Novels are sold 
openly at the present day which, if offered for sale a few years 
ago, would have landed the bookseller in jail, or would have sub- 
jected him to the payment of a heavy fine. It is not the purpose 
of this article to advertise any such books, even by allusions 
which might be surmised, for there is no need of specifying the 
books referred to. We all know many of them, for they are 
thrust under our noses on almost every street, and flaunt them- 
selves in the windows of booksellers, who might occupy the space 
to much better advantage. They, the booksellers, defend them- 
selves, if reproached on this score, upon the plea that they merely 
cater to the public; that it is a matter of indifference to them 
whether they sell God's books or the devil's; and that unless there 
were a demand for indecent literature, they should not think of 
keeping it on hand, nor of attempting to force it on the market. 
Unhappily, the plea is one of much force and validity. The 
American people have run mad, seemingly, over a school of 
fiction, which possesses no intrinsic merit beyond the skillful and 
brilliant stringing together of words and making of phrases. Most 
of the erotic fiction which is so popular at this time, whether it 
be imported or of domestic manufacture, is untrue to nature, 
faulty in its methods, hysterical in its details and grossly exag- 
gerated in its climaxes. The characters are pure figments of the 
author's imagination, constructed for the sole purpose of being 
analyzed and dissected afterwards, and of being put into un- 
natural and abnormal situations and complexities, unlike any- 
thing that could possibly happen in real life, outside of a lunatic 
asylum. These puppets are dressed up in gorgeous habiliments, 
endowed with passion in place of affection, and lust instead of 
love, made to disport themselves in an atmosphere heavy with 
perfumes and reeking with the odors of wines and spices, and the 
result is the picture of saturnalia, such as would have made the 
Abbe Dubois blush for shame, or at least turn green with envy. 
And this sort of stuff is at the call of every boy and girl who can 
muster up cheek enough to go into the stores and ask for it. 
Why, the " Kreutzer Sonata," on which the Postoffice Depart- 
ment waged such fierce war, is purity itself compared to much of 
the fiction which is sold everywhere. The tendency of the age in 
this respect is disheartening. It portends an era of decadence, in 
intellect as well as in morals, and makes the outlook for the 
future of America gloomy indeed. 



Jan. 17. 1891. 



SAN FK VNCIS< NEWS ! ETTER, 



HOW EASY IT IS. 

AVKUY i\- itnk that the brilliant writer 

i* the MM Who cjin scold 11 and can pile tip objur- 

^rations and derogatory epiiln t ion Pellon piled; and yel 

ihr fact i* that it i« the . kind «>f OOtnposHIon t" -my 

one who has any facility with the pen anil a lair knowledge o( 
the Bogttafa language. It i r* easy f <»r two reasons— fi r> t . because 
any dictionary or thesaurus will sup] ly the writer with all tbe ad- 
jectives he neetN. uidf eeoond, beca ise In- is always Mire of an in- 
terested ami sympathizing clientele. It requires only a very slight 
exercise of one*! industry and ingenuity to pick out ami construct 
for bim self an objurgatory vocabulary. The principal requisite 
is to have the epithets long enough to look formidable. There is 
a certain quality of terror about polysyllables which is hard to 
overcome, as was illustrated by the past mistress of billingsgate 
being floored by being called a rectangular parallelogram. In or- 
dinarily wordy warfare she could hold her own, but the rotundity 
of the geometrical terms took all the wind out of her sails, and she 
incontinently abandoned the contest. But the real strength of 
tbe abusive writer lies in the fact that most people are only too 
eager to believe ill of their neighbors and acquaintances, and 
hence they roll the epithets of the so-called brilliant writer as a 
sweet morsel under their tongues. Especially is this the case if 
an attack be made on one whose standing is high in the commu- 
nity and who has been known as an exemplar of virtue and good 
works. Mankind takes the same delight, apparently, in seeing 
such an one topple from bis eminence as boys take in starting a 
huge rock from the brow of a hilland watching it go leaping and 
thundering down to the plain below. The professor of the art of 
writing abuse, not being wholly a fool, takes advantage of this 
propensity and feels assured that no matter what slander he may 
set afoot it will be eagerly welcomed if its object is a person of 
any consequence and if the adjectives be plentiful enough. He 
must, it is true, use some adroitness in selecting his words, 
because to call a man a fool or a liar is so common as to be 
within tbe power of every one; but all he needs to do is 
to ring the verbal changes on the single idea, and the world stands 
lost in admiration of his brilliancy and his marvelous command of 
language. If he can steal or borrow an epigram and adapt it to 
his purpose, so much the better for him, for most people are not 
acquainted with the subject, and be will receive credit for a fertility 
of imagination and a knack of combining ideas apparently incon- 
gruous, which will add greatly to his reputation. It is time, how- 
ever, that the glamour which hangs around this style of writing 
should be dispelled. It is so easy that it might be guaranteed to 
be taught in ten lessons, or even less, if the pupil be' apt. Given 
a dictionary, a volume of quotations and an attack of dyspepsia, 
and the pupil is fully equipped. The first attempts will be crude, 
possibly, and such as to tend to a breach of the peace ; but, by tbe 
fourth or fifth lesson, the scholar will have learned to shed obloquy 
and distil venom with the greatest ease, and by the time the course 
is finished, may be warranted to rival Jonathan Swift in a "nice 
derangement of epitaphs," though, perhaps, he may not use his 
weapons so much to the point as did the Dean. A little practice 
in his newly-acquired art will soon teach the pupil how far he may 
go without incurring tbe risk of having his head broken by some 
irate victim, and will indicate to him his limitations. He will 
soon learn not to attack those who will strike back, but to be very 
humorous and sarcastic at the expense of the weak and defense- 
less. As soon as he has learned this lesson thoroughly his educa- 
tion in the art of objurgation is complete, and his reputation will 
soon be established as a brilliant writer. 



SILLY WAR TALK. 



OUR DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STIRRING. 



LEGISLATIVE attention is at last being called to the importance 
of securing statistics which may be of benefit to settlers in tbe 
arid region of the continent, which used to be known as the «» Great 
American Desert," and the Department of Agriculture has been 
engaged, during last summer, in ascertaining the best spots for 
the location of artesian wells within the area west of the ninety- 
seventh meridian and east of the Rocky Mountains. The informa- 
tion so obtained is about to be published in the form of a report, 
dealing with the agricultural conditions, fauna and flora, water 
supply, etc., of this extensive region, comprising, as it does, Da- 
kota, Nebraska, a large portion of Kansas, Indian Territory and 
Texas, besides New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. 
A large portion of this area goes under the name of public stock 
lands, which are held by ranchmen who pay no rent for the same, 
and who, at present, hold control of tbe water supplies, thus put- 
ting them in a much better position than stockmen not on the 
public domain and practically destitute of water. The object 
aimed at is, of course, the throwing open of these public lands to 
settlement, by demonstrating that they can be irrigated, and this 
it is that excites the opposition of the present rent-free possessors. 
It is a move in the right direction, but does not proceed far enough, 
and it is suggested that the survey be extended, as soon as practi- 
cable, to include the region lying between the Sierra Nevada and 
the Rockies. Arizona, Nevada and Utah demand equal attention. 
An exploring expedition left the other morning for Death Valley 
to prepare a complete topographical map of the country and secure 
botanical, zoological and other statistics. This is a good start. 



SCARCELY a day pn -<■•. without a rntnoi of war between 
Qreai Britain and the United States, to grow oat of the 
Bebring 8ea qoestlon ; and yet there Is absolutely no foundation 
for any snob rumors In anything that baa occurred, nor is- there 
any hint of any Mich thing in all tbe correspondence exchanged 
between tbe two govern ruenta. Great Britain ban never formally 
protested against the President's proclamation forbidding the 
taking .if Beats In tbe waters of Alaska, nor has she ever made a 
demand for the release and restoration of the Canadian sealing 
vessels seized in Bebring Sea. Two such nations as England and 
America do not go to war as two angry boys might engage in a fis- 
tic encounter. It is entirely safe to say that if any serious diffi- 
culty shall arise, every resource of diplomatic negotiation will be 
exhausted before either nation will dream of declaring war. It 
is true that some of our Canadian neighbors are very bellicose 
and would like to see England draw the sword at once against the 
United States, but they are in the position of the saucy small boy 
who relies on his big brother to fight his battles for him. They 
would have little to do except to stand by and see the struggle. 
It is absurd, when one reflects upon it, to think of war between 
the two greatest nations on earth over the ownership and right 
of capture of certain wild animals which really serve no useful 
purpose but only minister to luxury and vanity. The entire 
catch of seals for a season would not pay one week's expenses of 
a war between the United States and England, to say nothing of 
the sacrifice of life and tbe disorganization of commercial rela- 
tions. What is needed is to agree upon a basis of arbitration and 
submit all the moot points to a disinterested tribunal, whose de- 
cision shall be final. It is more than probable that there are two 
sides to the case ; that there are certain rights appertaining to each 
nation; and that the claims of each require modification. This 
being so, a court of arbitration is the place for settlement of the 
dispute, and not war, which settles nothing unless it be the ques- 
tion of relative warlike strength. 



THE STORM SIGNAL FLYING. 

FROM the moment the Legislature convenes at Sacramento the 
people of the State begin to make ready for the cyclone which 
they feel in the air. They do not go quite so far as the dwellers 
on the great plains of the West, who crawl into a hole in the 
ground and pull the hole in after them, but they sit in fear and 
trembling, wondering when and where the storm will burst and 
bow much of their property they will be able to save from the 
wreck. And yet this feeling of dread and apprehension is charge- 
able directly to the people themselves. If they would nominate 
and elect proper representatives to the Senate and Assembly, men 
who would have the interests not only of their immediate con- 
stituents but of the whole State at heart, and who would put the 
same zeal and integrity into public affairs that they do into the 
conduct of their private business, the Legislature would soon 
cease to be an object of suspicion. Indeed, under such condi- 
tions, it would be esteemed an honor to be elected to the Legisla- 
ture, and Senators and Assemblymen would vie with each other 
in making a record for the advocacy and passage of wise and 
beneficial laws. The difficulty at the present time is that the 
standard of legislators has fallen so low that a nomination to the 
Legislature is generally given to some importunate party worker 
for whom no other place can be found conveniently. Some man 
who has been useful to his party wants, it may be, a deputyship 
in one of the city offices, but is appeased by a nomination to the 
Assembly, and so a man who is not considered of sufficient abil- 
ity to perform clerical or routine work in a municipal office is sent 
to Sacramento to make laws for the whole State of California. No 
wonder that the storm signal is set on the first day of the session 
and kept flying until the gavel falls on the adjournment sine die. 
Experience has taught the people, to their cost, that a Legisla- 
ture, no matter what its political complexion, is apt to be very 
liberal with other people's money, and the danger is never over 
until tbe legislators have separated and returned to their con- 
stituents. 

iT would appear that, on account of the recent agitation in England 
against the Muscovite persecution of the Jews, the feeling in 
Russia against John Bull is increasing considerably. We see it 
mentioned in a London journal that the Czar's Government has 
decided to dispense with English Consuls holding Russian posts, 
and many of ■ those holding office in large towns have been in- 
formed of this decision. In the case of one of the north of Eng- 
land seaports, the deposed Consul had held the appointment for 
thirty years, but not even in his case was any leniency shown. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 




OUR Eastern visitors have not been able to find much fault 
with San Francisco weather this winter. On the contrary, I 
have heard nothing but words of sincere congratulations from those 
who have escaped the intense cold " at home," to enjoy the glorious 
sunshine of the Pacific Coast. We, on our native heath, have, per- 
haps, found the frosts a trifle more severe than suits our taste, but 
when contrasted with the incessant cold rainfall of last winter, who 
among us should complain ? 

This has been rather an off week, so far as festivities go, but it is 
usually the case in San Francisco after a rush of such continuous 
dinners, lunches and teas as were in order last week. Society seems 
inclined to take a rest of a few days before commencing the race 
anew ; and when one reviews the list of last week's " feeds," such a 
result is not a matter of much wonder. The Sharon dinner on Tues- 
day; Mrs. Coleman's lunch, Mrs. Sherwood's and Mrs. Goad's din- 
ners on Wednesday; Mrs. Towne's lunch, Mrs. Ashe's tea, Mrs. 
Head's dinner and "Mrs. Will Tevis' supper on Thursday, and Mrs. 
Holbrook's lunch on Friday, at all of which nearly the same set of 
guests were present, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon being the motif for 
most of the parties, on account of their departure East. San Fran- 
cisco is yet primitive enough to make this seem a formidable list. 
By and "bye, when the city becomes more like other centres of the 
world's population, they will be such a matter of course, week after 
week, that the cause for wonder would be were the daily entertain- 
ments not yet more numerous. At Mrs. Will Tevis', last Thursday 
evening, the supper was not the only enjoyable feature, the music 
coming in for a large amount of approbation, more especially the 
numbers given by the Ferrars, to whom it is always such a delight to 
listen. Mrs. Tevis herself, Mrs. McGavinand Mrs. Sharon also con- 
tributed greatly to the pleasure of the other guests, by giving some 
of their choicest selections. By the way, the report was quite freely 
circulated last week that the Fred Sharons were to forsake New York 
a3 a place of residence, and return to their birthplace, San Francisco, 
to make their permanent abode. But from all I can learn, I think 
there is little truth in the rumor, and however much their friends 
may hope for such a result, they are doomed to disappointment if 
they place any reliance upon the pleasing fiction. 

Whether it is that Wagner is gaining in popularity with our people 
or that it is considered the correct thing to go and hear him, certes 
the fashionable audiencss at the Baldwin are those when his operas 
are sung by the Juch Company, and several large theatre parties were 
given when Tannhauscr was the attraction. These, with some dinners, 
a couple of lunches, a tea and a card party have supplied the chief 
dissipations of this week. 

Next week's gaieties will include what will be the first two balls of 
the season— those of Mrs. Crocker and Mrs. Perrin— for all of the 
evening parties given so far have not risen above the dignity of 
dances, and between a dance and a ball there is a most decided differ- 
ence. 

Expectation is on tiptoe regarding the Crocker ball on Tuesday 
night. All sorts of rumors are current, and some of them so ex- 
travagant that, in this case, it would be utterly impossible for reality 
to exceed anticipation, however fully it may equal it. 

Dr. and Mrs. Perrin have shown their wisdom in taking Pioneer 
Hall for the entertainment they propose giving on Thursday evening. 
Their list of acquaintances is such a large one no ordinary house 
could contain their guests with any degree of comfort, and. therefore, 
the hall was decided upon, and a delightful gathering will surely be 
the result. Those who remember the many charming parties given 
at Mrs. Perrin's home when she was Miss Lilo McMuilen will admit 
that she has been well trained in the art of giving enjoyable enter- 
tainments. Her mother, Mrs. McMuilen. will assist her in receiving 
her guests, as well as Miss Addie Perrin, who has just returned from 
the long visits she has been paying to friends in the East. 

But three weeks more remain of the gay season ere Lent is upon 
us, and it behooves intending entertainers to be on the alert, or they 
will find themselves out of the running. Several other large enter- 
tainments have been spoken of as likely to be given during that time, 
but of all those rumored, the only one that is at all certain to take 
place will be the reception to Mrs. John Reis, which is named for the 
week after next. It is to be hoped, however, that everything will not 
be left till the last possible moment, and, as has so often hitherto 
been the case, the last ten days will be so crowded with events that 
they become more of a toil than a pleasure. Now that Mrs. Voluey 
Spalding has returned from her long absence in the East, she will, 
no doubt, do something in the way of entertaining to make her 
friends rejoice to have her at home again, her parties are always such 
pleasant affairs. And Mrs. Fair is also looked for almost any day 
now, and she too will probably contribute a tea or dance before the 
season closes. News from the field of the Indian warfare has been a 
little more encouraging of late, and our heroes at the Presidio cher- 
ish hopes that their brothers in arms will not be called upon to shed 
any more of their blood in conflict with the savages. The fortnightly 
hops at that post are pleasant little affairs, but under the new regime 
they are more confined to Army people, and there are fewer outsiders 
present at thero than was customary with their predecessors last year 
and the year before. For the moment there are no weddings taking 
place, nor are there any on the tapis. Miss Louie Bandmann's mar- 
riage to Mr. Rothwell, which was to have been solemnized about this 
period, having been postponed until after Easter. There were also 
some amateur theatricals talked of some time ago, but they have ap- 
parently fallen through as they have failed to materialize. 

The telegraph brings us brief news of the marriage of Miss Florence 
Audenreid to Count Foresta de Divonne, which took place in Wash- 
ington at noon on Wednesday last. St. Matthews Church, where it 
was solemnized, was beautifully decorated and filled with an as- 
semblage of guests, comprising everybody of distinction or import- 



ance in Washington society. Arch-bishop Corrigan performed the 
ceremony. Dr. Chapp%Ile assisting him, and Mr. .lames G. Blaine 
gave away the bride, who wore a costume of silver brocade of Paris- 
ian manufactureand was attended by four bridesmaids. The groom's 
brother, Count Albert, was best man and there were eight ushers. 

Conflicting statements continue to come from Washington city 
regarding the state of Senator Hearst's health, and though his 
friends here still hope the best, they are not unprepared to hear the 
worst at any time. Senator and Mrs Stewart are most delightfully 
settled for the season in Paymaster Smith's handsome house on H 
street, where Mrs. Bessie Hooker and Miss Adrich will prove able 
assistants at the numerous entertainments that are now on the cards 
to be given by Mrs. Stewart in the immediate future. 

The re-election of Senator Stanford has caused many expressions 
of delight to be heard in Washington society, where the Senator and 
Mrs. Stanford have become great favorites and looked upon as actual 
necessities in the swim of fashionable life. 

The Oakland Cotillion Club gave a very pleasant party last Friday 
night, it being the third of their series. Mr. Folger covered himseif 
with glory for the efficient manner in which he fulfilled the duties of 
leader, though there was nothing startlingly novel in the figures 
danced. There was another jolly little dance at the San Francisco 
Yacht Club House at Sausalito on Saturday evening, it being the sec- 
ond of the series lately inaugurated by the Club. These parties are 
largely informal, but are very enjoyable and well attended, several 
going over from the city last Saturday for the purpose of joining in 
the dance. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kittle and Miss Lucia are among the most re- 
cent arrivals in town for the season, which they will spend at the Pal- 
ace Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Mizner and Mr. Ed. Mizner will be due 
here on their return from Central America next week. Minister Pa- 
checo has sailed for the scene of his duties in Guatamala, and though 
Mrs. Pacheco will remain in San Francisco for some months yet, it is 
probable she will join her husband in Central America about the first 
of April. Mr. C. W. Bonynge is in the city, arriving this week from 
London. 

News from our absentees gives the intelligence that Mrs. Stuart 
Taylor and Mr. and Mrs. Henley Smith are in Paris; Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Tubbs and family doing Egypt; 
Mrs. Catherwood and her family spending the winter in Italy; Mrs. 
Haggin and Miss Rita are settled for the winter in Tucson; Mrs. 
Louis Haggin has taken up her abode iu New York, where she has 
gone to housekeeping. Felix. 

"THE HOLE IN THE WELL." 

CALIFORNIA'S laws are made on the top of a whisky mill. 
Fact! The place in the Capitol known as "the hole in the 
well," is a dark, dingy, uncomfortable smelling place, immedi- 
ately underneath the floor on which our legislators air their elo- 
quence and frame the laws that are masterful in their power over 
us all. The Secretary of State is custodian of the building and 
during the sessions of the Legislature he usually contrives to se- 
cure a perquisite for himself by giving permission to somebody 
to use this noisome hole for the purposes of whisky peddling. It 
is a curious fact in the early history of the present " reform" 
Legislature that it has just tacitly assented to the continued ex- 
istence of this vile den, which in times past has brought so much 
disgrace upon legislative proceedings. In it representatives of 
the people have ere now been made so drunk that they openly 
accepted bribes and boasted of the price of their iniquity. It has 
led to rows, fights and disturbances that are singularly out of 
place around a Legislature. Yet a call for its suppression has 
just been made in vain. Motions have been submitted in both 
Houses to order it closed, but they have been shelved or got rid of 
by an indirection. The presumed desire of the members to re- 
move temptation from the paths of the officials, lobbyists, visitors 
and other persons not proof against the seductions of the whisky 
bottle was ineffectually appealed to. Strange to say, nobody 
seemed to see that nothing more was required to cure the evil 
than the services of a policeman. The law makes it a misde- 
meanor to either sell or give away intoxicants in the Capitol or on 
the grounds adjacent thereto. Somebody is violating the law and 
with the cognizance, if not assistance, of men sworn to uphold 
the law. That is the really serious phase of the matter. Law 
makers should not be law breakers. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 



SOLE AGENT FOR 

PACIFIC COAST, 

123 California St., S.F, 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



FOB SALE BY ALL PIBST-CLAS8 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



SAN FR INCIS< NEWS I I I 111; 



WOMEN AND THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF THE 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 
[Bt Pi Vi 

Avkmknt. wide spread In lis Intareat and n at tonal in it-* 
importance, now claims the mention »>f tin* woman <>f Ibe 
1'niiiMl States. Those who have At heart the usefulness and 
-g influence of women physicians have on t ted l«> raise 
funds for the endowment ol i i hool In connection with 

the Johns Hopkins Onlverslty. Thia eonrse ^ the resall of ft 
series of elrcnmstancea which art- §g follows: Bome time since, 
women, who were desirous of takinp an advanced medical course, 
applied to the ruling powers of the Johns Hopkins University to 
know if the Medical Bchool destined In time to be opened as a 
part of tnat University, would admit women. A negative was 
the answer. As stated by the general circular issued to further 
the work of collecting subscriptions to the endownment fund of 
the projected school of applied medicine, " It is to the general 
interest that the school should be opened within the next few 
years. But not until the Trustees of the University can be as- 
sured of establishing and maintaining a school worthy in every 
respect of the reputation of the University, and adequate for all 
purposes of complete medical instruction, will the attempt be 
made. The srhool will differ from all other medical schools in the 
country, the University having assured the advanced character 
of tbe instruction by organizing in 1882 among the courses lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Arts a Preliminary Medical 
Coarse, including biology, chemistry and physics, to be required 
for admission to the school." The school will not conflict with 
the other medical schools in tbe United States. It will give to 
their graduates what they are now obliged to go to Europe to ob- 
tain. At this point the work of tbe women of the United States 
conies in. Not disheartened by tbe refusal of the powers that 
be to admit their sex to the educational privileges of tbe institu- 
tion, they addressed a second communication to the Board offer- 
ing to raise a preliminary $100,000 with as much more as possible, 
and to place the sum in the bands of the Trustees for the use of the 
medical school on condition that women whose previous train- 
ing had been equivalent to that of the preliminary medical course 
of the University should be admitted to the school, whenever it 
should be opened, on the same terms as men. This proposition 
was unanimously accepted by the Board, which expressed itself 
thus: 

"This Board is satisfied that in hospital practice among women, in penal 
Institutions in which women are prisoner*, in charitable institutions in 
which women are cared for, aud iu private life where women are to be 
attended, there is a need and place for learned aud capable women phy- 
sicians. Abundant work awaits them in these wide fields of usefulness." 

The admission of women to the Medical School of the Johns 
Hopkins University is now assured. How may those interested 
hasten the opening of the Medical School? By raising $400,000 
in addition to tbe $100,000 already contributed through the 
Women's Fund. This is what tbe women of the United States 
have undertaken, to raise tbe entire amount necessary for the en- 
dowment of the Medical School, in order to acquire for them- 
selves the right and the opportunity to have an advanced medical 
education. And men are to reap the advantages of their labors. 
In order to get in themselves, the women are going to make it 
possible for men sooner to have tbe privileges of this school. As 
might have been expected, this proposition and its acceptance by 
the Board of Trustees, drew forth much adverse comment from 
those who are ranged against the higher education of women. To 
them all Mary Putman Jacobi, M.D., of New York, replies: "It 
is no longer possible to absolutely deprive the best intellect in the 
one sex of the necessary opportunities which are freely accessible 
to the most mediocre capacities in the other. The universities of 
France, Switzerland, Italy, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and 
Belgium have not found their prestige impaired and their useful- 
ness limited by the admission of women to their just share of 
educational privileges. There is no case on record in which tbe 
admission of women has lowered the standard. When women 
bestow money upon colleges devoted exclusively to men, their 
action is applauded as generous and public-spirited. Here one 
woman alone, Miss Mary Garrett, has given $50,000 from her own 
private fortune, for the intellectual benefit of her own sex, and 
others have worked and given with equal disinterestedness in 
proportion to their means. To John Garrett's influence was 
largely due tbe original direction of Johns Hopkins' bequest. It 
is nobly fitting that to John Garrett's daughter should be chiefly 
owing the just extension of the Johns Hopkins' privileges to 
women." 

Perhaps no other cause ever embraced so wide a diversity of 
leading classes interested as does this attempt to raise the neces- 
sary funds for the endowment of this medical school. It is not 
only medical women, or those who desire to become such, that 
are devoting themselves to the cause. But the wives and daugh- 
ters of our most prominent physicians all over the country are on 
committees; ladies of social importance, the wives of Senators 
and Congressmen, literary women, all are lending the full weight 
of their influence to the noble endeavor to give this coveted prize 
to women. A glance at the personnel of the local committees of 



each 8taU Will disclose many familiar and leading names. In 
Baltimore, Miss v ., ft|rs. Bmmons Blaine, Mrs. « * 

Bonaparte; in Philadelphia, l>r. alios Bennett, Mrs. George Bid 
die, Mrs. Anthony Drexel, tfrs. Wayne UaoVeagh, Mr-, s. Weir 
Mitchell and urs. William Pepper; In New York. Dr. Bmily 
Blackwell. Mrs. Grover Cleveland, Mrs, Richard Watson Glider, 
Mrs. J. Pierponl Morgan, Hiss Georgians Bchayler, Mrs. Henry 
Yiliurd. and !>r. Mary Putnam Jacobi; in Boston, Mrs. J. Q. 
Adams, Mrs. I. ml: Mrs. Walter 0. Cabot. Mrs. Jails 

Ward How, MlssSarab OrneJewett, Miss Alios M. Longfellow, 
I»r. Zakrxewska; In Washington, Mrs. Benjamin Harrison, Mrs. 
I., r. Morton, Mrs. Wm. Wlndom, Mrs. John Wanamaker, Mrs. 
Stanley Mathews, Mrs. Charles Nonllioli, Mrs. Lcland Stanford; 
these are a Few of tbe names of leading ladies eager to raise the 
money for the endowment fund. California has been somewhat 
late in getting to work, but with our usual impetuosity and energy 
we are making good our brief bpace of time. Contributions have 
been flowing in, and more are expected. Mrs. George Hearst has 
presented the committee with her check for a thousand dollars. 
The names of the local committee are appended in full; 

PACIFIC COAST. 
Dr. Emma Sutro Merritt. Chairman, 530 Sutter street, Sau Frauclsco. 
Mrs. George Hearst, 1>, Ct.ainnmi, 1400 New Hampshire Ave, Washington. 

Miss Amelia Summerton, • ■ ' ■ >/, ma Onion street, San Franclico 
Dr. Isabel Lowry, Treasurer, £18 Van Ness Avenue, Sau Francisco. 

Mrs. William B. Alvord, Dr. Charlotte B. Brown, 

Mrs. Alfred A. Cohen. Mrs. Sarah B. Cooper, 

Mrs. Katheriue B Fisher, Miss A. M. Fulton, 

Mrs. W. B Harrington, Mrs. Henry Gibbons. 

Miss Caroline C. Jackson. Mrs. Mary W. Kincaid, 

Miss Mary Lake, Dr. Agues Lowry, 

Mrs. \V. F. McNutt, Mrs. John F. Merrill, 

Mrs D. W. Moutgomtry, Mrs. Henry Palmer, 

Mrs S. F. Prentiss, Mrs. Wm. Crocker, 

Mrs. El wood Cooper, Miss Sabiu, 

Mrs. Edna Suell Poulson, Mrs. A. A. Sargent, 

Mrs. Caroline M. Severance, Mrs. Robert Sherwood, 

Miss Milliceut W. Shiun, Mrs. D. J. Staples, 

Miss Mary B. West, Dr. Lucy M. F. Wanzer. 



COL. WM. J. SUTHERLAND, President of the Holmes Mine, 
has left for Candelaria. He is accompanied by Captain Hulse, 
one of the English Directors. 



w. 



S. METLAR has been appointed Secretary of the Silver 
King Mining Company, vice A. Waterman, resigned. 



Ayer's Hair Vigor prevents the hair from falling, and restores 
gray hair to its original color. Ayer's Almanac at your druggist's. 



The oyster depot of Moraghan, in the California Market, is always 
open both day and night to supply customers. 

Violet, I know your eyes are getting duler. Seek the advice of our Op- 
tician, Muller, 135 Montgomery street. 

NOTICE! 



The Laurel Hill Cemetery Association, 

Through its Directors, having recently completed certain arrangements 
whereby the eutire receipts of the Association will in the future be devoted 
to the better adorumeut and embellishment of the Cemetery, propose, after 
inclosing the grounds with a suitable wall, to continue, as fast as the re- 
sources will allow, to make LAUKEL HILL one of the most beautiful of 
cemeteries and an ornament to our city. 

This Association would likewise call the attention of the public to the 
fact that it is still offering, at prices to suit, 

Family and Single Burial Plots, 

Improved and unimproved, and all work pertaining to rural cemeteries, 
such as watering aud caring lor plots and improving same, will be done at 
reasonable rates. 

Any communications addressed to CHARLES H. CltOWELL, Secre- 
tary, Laurel Hill Cemetary, Sau Francisco, will receive attention. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

North Commonwealth Mining Company, 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the North Common- 
wealth Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, No. 310 
PiDe street, rooms 15 aud 17, Sau Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 27th day of January,! 891 , at the hour of 1 :30 o'clock P. M , 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuiug 
year, aud the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Friday, January 23, 1891, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, Sau Francisco, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

State Investment and Insurance Company, 

At a regular meeting of the State Investment and Insurance Company, 

held on Tuesday, January 13, 1891, a dividend of one per cout was declared, 

payable at the office of the company, 218 and 220 Sansome street, on and 

after Jauuary 15, 1891. 

1 CHARLES H. CUSHING, Secretary. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



E??iSi/i55TlfctfD 



We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom. Moore. 



TANNHAUSER, as practically a new production here, filled the 
Baldwin Theatre last Monday night with a great audience 
and great expectations. The latter were almost unreservedly 
met. If there was one disappointment — Tannhauser, himself — it 
was, perhaps, because Mr. Hedmondt's Erik and Lohengrin had 
led us to expect so much. Mr. Hedmondt sang well, but in cer- 
tain scenes his manner and vocalization alike were unimpassioned 
almost to the point of perfunctoriness. Notably in the scene in 
which be prostrates himself in wild, despairing abasement at the 
foot of the shrine before starting on his expiatory pilgrimage to 
Rome, his singing was so mechanical (though mechanically per- 
fect) and his expression so little in unison with the dark despair 
in his words, as to suggest the possibility that he was inwardly 
laughing at the incongruity of the character with nineteenth cen- 
tury ideas, and, unfortunately, taking the audience into his con- 
fidence. The lack in this particular was not, however, either so 
palpable or so discomfiting as it looks in print, and was felt, 
rather than acknowledged, only as a slight jar in a perfectly- 
rounded harmony. Elizabeth was a dream realized. Miss Juch's 
tender and melting beauty transfused with the artist's soul and 
self-identification with the devoted and hapless maiden of the 
legend, made her the ideal Elizabeth, and her pure and thrilling 
tones confirmed to the ear what the eye had already reported. 
Had Miss Juch sung nothing else while here, she would never be 
forgotten, nor the debt due her by the music-loving San Fran- 
ciscans ever be unacknowledged. 

» * » 

Otto Rathjens, as Wolfram gave a renewed proof not only of 
his rare artistic abilities, but of that subtle and unexplained 
power to influence an audience which we call "magnetism," and 
which may be a mingling of mental comprehension, sensitiveness 
and depth of feeling, with a pervasive and all-embracing sympa- 
thy which reaches out and draws to itself the soul and sense of 
the hearer. Whatever this magnetic gift may be, it is in singer 
or orator, the one without which all others are but subjects for 
cold and deliberate criticism. It is this which has made of every 
rote an identity rather than an impersonation. 

Franz Vetta was a noble and impressive Landgrave, the heavy 
music being apparently managed with effortless facility. Carlotta 
Maconda made a pretty picture as a young shepherd seated on a 
rock playing the traditional pipes, and sang as prettily. If it does 
not savor of hypercriticism, one might suggest that her smiles, 
pretty and bright as they were, suggested the arch and insinuat- 
ing smile of the pet of the ballet rather more than is quite con- 
sistent with pastoral simplicity. 

The opening scene in "Venus' Hill" did not present so startling 
an array of female beauty as to arouse in even the most suscept- 
ible auditor, any overpowering sense of Tannhauser's stoicism of 
repentance in tearing himself away from the soft dalliance of his 
wasted year. On the contrary, it excited a deep sympathy 
with the hero's desire to "break away," and as deep a conviction 
that a year of sin in that locality would be about as much as the 
least exacting sinner could stand, while another would be expia- 
tion and penance for both. But when Madame Januschowsky 
rose to the situation in her full-blown beauty and wrath, deter- 
mined to hold on to her conquest at all hazards, her strongly 
dramatic singing and action was powerful enough to cause a re- 
vulsion of feeling and to threaten stamping the knight as a "cad" 
for deserting her. 

The ensemble in general was better than at any previous Wag- 
nerian production, while the orchestration from prelude to finale 
was a grand poem in music as grandly interpreted. The call for 
the leader, Herr Neuendorf!, when the singers appeared at re- 
peated recalls, was a tribute warmly indorsed by every auditor 
present. 

# # # 

As a drama we have read and heard so much of Tannhauser that 
we are as familiar with it as if it had been*heard hpre. Its theme, 
in its gloomily religious element, is an impossible anachronism. 
Any one gifted with the slightest poetic imagination can throw 
himself into the story of the " Holy Grail " and the mysticism of 
its awful obligations as resting on Lohengrin, as into that of the 
weird, mysterious doom of the Flying Dutchman. But the spec- 
tacle of a strong and very human-looking man, bound down 
under an awful sense of doom and despair for a year spent in 
dissipation, and " doing his dree " for absolution from any super- 
annuated and unsympathizing pope or prelate so long as his girl 
was willing to overlook it, is too far, yet not far enough, behind 
current religion to appeal very strongly to our sympathies. The 
idea is out of date, without a classic antiquity to reinstate it in 
interest on poetic grounds. (Perhaps something of this feeling, 
or impossibility of feeling, may account for Mr. Hedmondt's im- 
passiveness as compared with the lire and fervor of his Erik in 
The Dutchman and the majestic poetry of his Lohengrin.) 

The grandeur of Tannhauser is in its musical side, and owes little 
to the subject. But it has enough of this to live forever. 



The Bush street generally looks askance on " the legitimate." 
As its manager says, with a good-natured shake of the head, "It 
ain't just exactly our line, you know." The records of the favor- 
ite little theatre show, however, many a success in this line — but 
the engagement which ends a short but not brilliant week to- 
morrow night is not on this list. The Englishman's courage and 
endurance have been tested and proven in every quarter of the 
globe. But a realizing sense of his staying powers never came 
home to San Francisco as when it saw Miss Adelaide Moore as 
Juliet last Monday night, and read on the bill that she had played 
it in London for fifty consecutive nights. The conclusion is in- 
evitable that it was not to the same audience, or any fraction or 
fractions thereof. Personally unfitted to satisfy the idea of the 
fair Capulet, Miss Moore's mental and imaginative equipment 
seems still more inadequate There is absolutely nothing in her 
Juliet to give it a reason to be, but there are several things to give 
it cause not to be. One of these would naturally include the lack 
of an audience. What Mr. Clay Clement, the luckless Romeo, 
could do with a more inspiring Juliet, can not yet be known. 
At present he wavers between not very bad and very bad. Mrs. 
Capulet, one would judge, should have been able to scare anybody 
into marrying anybody else just by looking at her, while old 
Capulet distinguished himself in no special way unless it was In 
making up to resemble a venerable, but somewhat irritated, walrus. 
The Mercutio of Mr. Joseph Wheelock shone on the bosom of this 
Dead Sea of mediocrity like a bright isle in the dish-watery waste. 
He was a gallant, rollicking, brave and exceptionally virile Mer- 
cutio, as full of a genuine and original sense of humor as of devil- 
may-care recklessness and courage. He was loudly and repeatedly 
applauded, and, at his death at the hands of " bloody Tybalt," 
the applause culminated. It could not have been selfish rejoicing 
on the part of the audience, as, however glad it might have been 
to know that somebody was killed, it was bard that it should 
be the only one who ought to live. It must have been an unself- 
ish demonstration of joy at Mr. Wheelock's happy release from his 
surroundings. Miss Moore will play only one more consecutive 
night in San Francisco, and on Monday evening Donnelly and 
Girard, in Natural Gas, will restore the Bush to its natural status 
of a home of " innocent merriment." 

* * * 

The little Lords will be seen at the California no more after to- 
morrow (Sunday) evening, when the two small actresses will 
appear together — Gertie Homan asFauntleroy and Georgie Cooper 
as the bootblack. 

* # # 

A young man presented himself yesterday at the California 
box-oflice, with a demand for front seats in the orchestra. On 
asking him to remove his hat, however, it was found that his 
Hyperion locks were not thin enough on the top of his head to 
justify the demand, and the young man went away sadly with 
seats three rows back and the information that the entire front 
row had been reserved three weeks ago for a bald-headed theater- 
party. 

# # # 

Fay Templeton, otherwise " Miss McGinty of the Comedie 
Francaise," will appear at the California Monday night in skirts 
— the languishing dudes will scarcely recognize the sportive Fay 
except in tights — and is said to be as fascinating a " skirt dancer " 
as Rosina Vokes. Perhaps the inducement to this new departure 
was less a deference to the views of Anthony Comstock than the 
desire to display the ravisante costumes designed for her by 
Messieurs Worth and Felix, which are announced as " marvels 
of beauty." 

» * * 

The Tivoli will continue into next week the Widow O'Brien, 
with Keily as the Widow and the best Tivoli people in the cast. 
Frank Burrill, the new manager, left for this coast on Thursday. 
He has secured a number of new people and new productions for 
the coming season. The interval of preparation will probably be 
filled in with another "revival." 

# # # 

Richard Stahl, formerly of the Tivoli, is the conductor of the 
Natural Gas Company, which appears at the Bush street next 
Monday. 

«■ * * 

The Hess Opera Company has been having another successful 
week at the Orpheum with Aida and Carmen, with Signor Guille 
and Pauline 1/Allemande as the special stars of the respective pro- 
ductions. A sister of Miss L'AUemande, Marie Elsasser, made her 
dtbut Wednesday night as Micaela in Carmen. Adolph Liesegang 
assumed the leadership last Monday night. 

The Alcazar stock company's season ends with the present 
week, to-morrow evening being the last production of Her Atone- 
ment. The company will make its annual tour of the coast and 
interior towns during the next few months. 

# # • 

Ovide Musin will make a professional visit to the Coast in 
March next, under the management of Mr. R. E. Johnston. 



Jan. 17. 



g w n; w< rsro \iw s lki 



/*»/ M ich the climax «'( Int f t l "i ill.- 

present successful »e»on At Ihi 0o« ol Wftgntr 1 ! 

n( ind m»»t character:- \n<\ ooi quit* D( 

tbU cllj, it cannot fail to nil the [1 tldwlo Monday night with the 
most brilliant as well a- ■ .i| T appre.-iative KQdltnoc ol 

the ««'*«< >n. Tuesday. /Vr rVcuei I: will be given tnd on \V»«1- 
nesday a repetition of /■■ Wa 

• • • 

Strangers Tisttiog the cltj, particularly thOM familiar with the 
Europe and eastern American cities, note one over- 
sight on the part <»f our theatrical namely) tin- neglect 
of a distinct announcement <>f the night's performance*, at the 
door of the theatre, in sufficiently striking style to catch the eye 
of the passer by. It is, undoubtedly, easy enough to consult the 
advertisements in the papers oi t<> ?tep inside and inquireat the box 
office. But the terse announcement, conspicuously displayed, 
"7"<imi'i'iiurr to-night," "Natural Ga to-night," etc., would save 
time and trouble. Beside, the aimless wanderer about the streets in 
the early evening is not sufficiently interested to make inquiry, 
whereas if a taking placard caught his eye he might feel, "That's 
the very thing I want to see," and go in. There is no doubt that 
such a practice would not only he a convenience to a public, hur- 
ried even in its pleasure seeking, but would catch a great deal of 
chance patronage. 

• • • 

Charley Reed, who comes with the Kussell Comedians to the 
California Monday night, has a new song, "You Press the But- 
ton. We do the Rest." He will appear in Miss McGinty as an im- 
pecunious artist driven into a managerial career in spite of him- 
self. 

• # * 

The "original" Sioux Ghost Dance will be one of the novelties 
at the California next week. To be truly realistic, it should be 
danced by the "scalpers " in the lobby. 

• * * 

Lotta, the vivacious, whose rollicking and contagious gayety 
and humor seems to increase with the years, will follow grand 
opera at the Baldwin, January 2fith. Her engagement is limited 
to two weeks, during which she will be seen in Marsden's comedy, 
Musette, and in her new musical comedy, Ina. 

The first of the series of chamber concerts by Mrs. Carmichael- 
Carr, Sigmund Beel and assistants, will be given this (Saturday) 
afternoon at two o'clock, at Irving Hall. The next will take 
place January 31st. 

Dunlop's Stage News: Donnelly and Girard's Natural Gas [com- 
ing next week to the Bush, S. F.] is getting a reputation as a 
record-breaker in the West. Sam P. Cox is making arrange- 
ments to marry off the young ladies in his company in all the 
towns they play at. He says it booms business. He will secure 
divorces for them when they play return dates. 

Frank Blair, a former employe- of the San Francisco Mint, is 
still in the money-coining line, it appears, having made a big hit 
as Col. Mapleson Mulberry in Ship Ahoy. 

Men and Women had its one-hundredth production at Chas. 
Frobman's theatre, New York, lately. 

The music in Miss McGinty is all original — the work of W. S. 
Mullaly. 

Mrs. Thurber has not given up her grand opera scheme, but an- 
nounces her resolve to revive it soon. 

Bernhardt comes to America in February. She was to play at 
the Fifth Avenue, but will now probably appear at Palmer's. 
Sarah goes from here to Australia. 



A CARD has been issued by the Southern Pacific, and is being 
sent to all agents which change the number of all stations. For- 
merly the stations were numbered commencing at San Francisco 
and going East to New Orleans. According to the new arrangement 
the numbers begin at New Orleans and go west as far as El Paso, 
while the numbers beyond that point will commence at San Fran- 
cisco and end at El Paso. 



Next to getting married, perhaps the most important duty all 
men have to attend to, is to present an attractive appearance when 
walking out with their wives, and nothing gives a man a more dis- 
tingua appearance than a fine bat, such as can be purchased of White, 
the Hatter, 614 Commercial street. 



Mrs. Julia Melville Snyder, through a proper understanding and 
application of the principles of vocal culture, has perfect success with 
her pupils. Studio, 138 McAllister street. 



W. G. Badger, sole agent for Hallet, Davis & Co., W. W. Kimball 
& Co., celebrated pianos and organs, removed to History Building, 
725 Market street, ground floor. 

First class hosiery, fine shirts and all articles of superiorc urnish- 
ing goods for gentlemen for sale by J. W. Carmany, 25 Kearny St. 

Lakeview is the place to buy, build and invest. Have you seen it ? 
Then go at once. Buy lots in Lakeview. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 



Mr Ai. M*yv PtOpritlOl '•' \in:tf BOVVin, MftlmRcr. 

A. tk. HrilllKiil s . 

EMMA JUCH GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY I 

ttOOllOD rati ),. paid t,i ..rdcr* fOI 

by Ina money, No Opera will b« ohKOgod 

smnr.ii.yMnM.,..- BOIIKHIAN OIRI* Saturday Nlghl -FAUST; Emma 
JhHi it- Maraoerlto. 

Monday, .in ir> lath, and Wednc i ly. January 21st, Dm and only two 

productlo I wa nci i ■ torpl DIE » u.Kf'ltK. 

day, Jn r\ .'.i it it PREI80HO ' 

Thuraday, January ti Thrco Prima Donnas, IUQNON, BmuJni 
Boala for all tha ab&i peraa now on sale, 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre In the World. 

Mb. A i. Batman, Lessee and Proprietor | Mn. Harky Mann Manager 

MONDAY, .liuiiiiiry 10th, 

BU83ELT.'S COMEDIANS, Including Fay Temh.eton and Charley 
Reed, In the Latent Farce Comedy Success, 

MISS' McGINTY I 

(Of the Cnmedie Franchise.) 

NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Lbavitt. .Lessee and Proprietor | J. J. Gottlob Manager 

This afternoon at 2, 

THE LADY OF LYONS I 

Miss Adelaide Moori;, accompanied by Mr. JOSEPH Wheelock and a 
Strong Company. 
To-uight and to-morrow Night, 

ROMEO AND JULIET I 

Friday and Saturday Evenings— "PYGMALION AND GALATEA," and "A 
SILENT WOMAN." Sunday Evening— "A FATAL MARRIAGE." 
Monday, January 19th— Donnelly aud Girard in "NATURAL GAS." 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Krehno Bros — Proprietors and Managers 

To-Night! To-Night! To-Night! The Most Laughable of all Musical 
Absurdities, 

THE WIDOW O'BRIEN I 

Grand Olio, introducing numerous Specialties. 

Popular Prices 25c. and 50c. 

THE OLYMPIAN CLUB ROLLER SKATING RINK, 

(Entire Mechanics' Pavilion), 

Admission— Afternoon, 10 cents. Evening, 26 cents. 
Wednesday, January .dst— The Great Six Days' Race commences. 
First Grand Carnival— .Tauuary 31st. 
Saturday— Ladies' Championship Kace. 

Exhibition of the Paintings 

OF THE 

CELEBRATED PAINTER, PROF. I. I. REINHARDT, 
Court Palmer of <l»e Duke or Sachsen-Coburg-Uotha, 

FOB A BHOKT TIME ONLY, AT THE 

ZEUSTOIEVH- ZB-UTTIIljXJIiTGS-, 

Market Street, Fifth Floor, 
■ Between the hours of 10 A. M aud 5 p. »:. 



MAISON RICHE, 

The Leading Restaurant, 
104 Grant Avenue and 44 «eary Street, San Francisco. 



Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Supper, Wedding and Theatre Parties 

Supplied in the very best style and short notice. 
Telephone No. 1088. ^ 



OVER THE TEACUPS, 

BY OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES. 

JUST PUBLISHED BY 

WILLIAM DOXEY, 

Importer of New and Rare Books, 
Under Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



BUY " U. S." 44 WINCHESTER, 22 SHORT 

And other "U.S." Pistol and Rifle Cartridges. For accuracy and 
certainty of fire they have no equal. 

TJ. S. C^-iaTE.II3C3-E -CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



TIMBER CONSERVATION AND CYCLONES. 

THERE is really no more important subject handled, or rather 
not handled by the journals of the present day, than that 
whicL deals with the conservation of our timber lands in the lo- 
calities where nature has placed them. The wholesale and wan- 
ton destruction of forests and timber lands, over that vast area of 
country — Great American Desert it was called — extending from 
the Mississippi and Missouri rivers westward, clear to the 
Rocky Mountains, is, in the eyes of the foremost natur- 
alists of our day. Agassiz among the number, the cause of 
much, if not all of the meteorological convulsions of our 
day. This vast area comprised within its limits more and 
better land than Central Europe in its best days could call her own 
— in short, it never was a desert but in name. It holds now, and 
must continue to hold for centurus hence, the virgin phosphates 
without which the soil which grows our vegetables and the food 
for our domestic animals, would be dead indeed. But the Great 
American Desert holds another thing. It holds the cyclone. And 
just as sure as the timber goes down, does the cyclone come up. 
The avarice, laziness, negligence or ignorance of the farmer beats 
itself, and in the long run is its own recompense. He sees his 
crops, his homesteads and his barns torn up by the roots and 
borne away upon the blast, but he does not know why these 
things are so. It is all very well telling him that it is the hand of 
God, but in place of bowing bis bead to the breeze and waiting 
till it conies again, what if our American farmer was to study me- 
teorology a little bit? Fifty years ago such an idea would have 
been laughed at, but now this department of science has become 
one of the most practically important of the present day. We 
can tell, even as much as twenty-four hours ahead, and in some 
instances even farther, the set, direction, violence, centre and end 
of a coming storm. We prove the correctness of the formula 
over and over again. Still, what good does that do, unless we 
profit by our experience? Now, what does experience teach? It 
teaches us that trees are the natural gatherers of moisture; that 
their branches and their foliage let the condensed vapor of the 
seas, gently and easily, and by a natural process to the ground. It 
says that the tree is one of the greatest friends of man, and if we 
injudiciously cut him down, Dame Nature will give us a box on 
the ear for doing so. It is one thing to clear a forest with the 
object of making it habitable, but it is quite another thing to 
denude nature, either wantonly or for purposes of gain, of 
one of her most material products. One of the most thriving 
and populous districts of France a century or so ago, lying be- 
tween the Swiss Alps and the Valley of the Rhone, has now 
become practically a desert, as its inhabitants admit, through 
lack of arboreal conservation. The great plains of Western Asia 
— the sites of Babylon, Nineveh, Tadmore and Persepolis — are 
now the home of the lion and other wild beasts of the desert, and 
even these animals themselves make only a precarious living in 
a region where water itself is scarce. Damascus alone lives ever 
in the bloom of gardens. The Abanus and Pharpar ripple along 
as they did in the days of Naaman, the Syrian, around this hoary 
city of ages— what? Sand. And what used to be called the 
Great American Desert, ignorantly, it is granted, may yet come to 
be so in sober, serious fact. The western farmer is, in a great 
measure, responsible for the cyclone The very trees that he 
built his barn of cry out against him. We are accustomed to 
smile at our Oriental cousins, but there is one law in Japan which 
does that little country credit. It is this: Whenever a man cuts 
a tree down he must plant another in the same place. The gov- 
ernment of the United States of America, fortunately or unfor- 
tunately, is not a patriarchal government, and the most we can 
do is to call attention to the fact, that this very obvious need of 
timber conservation has been thought over and legislated on 
centuries ago by nations whom we are accustomed to consider 
far less civilized than ours. It is our wish merely to present a 
fair case for the consideration of the denizens of the ravaged 
districts, even though our western region, existing as it does un- 
der totally different meteorological conditions from those of the 
eastern and central regions of the continent, will, in all proba- 
bility, never be visited by the dread scourge of the cyclone. 



WEALTH IN FRANCE. 



THE property held by religious orders in France seems to be ac- 
cumulating at a prodigiuus rate. At the close of the reign of 
Louis Phillipe, it was estimated at $15, 000. 000. In 1880 it had 
risen in value to $150,000,000 and the present wealth of tberelig 
ious orders is $200,000,000. The ire of the Republicans has been 
excited by the fact that a good share of the interest on this money 
goes to assist Royalist electoral committees and M. de Freycinet 
has promised to bring in a bill to place ihe property of religious 
bodies in the same position as that of joint stock companies. In 
consequence of recent legislation in France in this respect, one 
result has been a transfer by French Roman Catholic Orders of 
all their available property to English banks, thus showing plainly 
their belief in English stability and justice. It is worthy of note 
that the Papal funds are also invested in England. 



FIGHTING FOR THE SHIPPING SUBSIDY BILLS. 

THE establishment of commerce-winning steam lines tends to 
build up great cities all the world over. By such means have 
New York and Liverpool become the great commercial entrep&ts 
they are. San Francisco's location on the map of the world 
renders efficient steam lines peculiarly desirable. Ours is the one 
central, accessible, and commodious harbor of the North Pacific. 
It may. in a sense, be said to be the natural home of the steamer 
in these waters. Here we have dockage accommodation, iron 
foundries and every other requisite. We have, also, merchant 
importers and exporters and a very great deal of freight to 
handle, which is increasing in quantity every year and may well 
be made to increase much faster than it now does. The wide 
Pacific, with its comparatively calm seas, lies invitingly open be- 
fore us. All around its borders are countries, and dotted over 
much of its area are islands, with which we ought to have inti- 
mate, speedy and profitable communication. If our half dozen 
or more ports on the Atlantic side have so good a thing in their 
trade with Europe, why may not this one port of the Pacific 
prosper exceedingly in developing the possibilities that confront 
us? It is in that way and in none other that San Francisco is to 
realize her great expectations. As a preliminary to successful 
commercial enterprise we need ocean carriers capable of com- 
peting with the best. The swift steamship is the commerce 
winner of the period. There is no denying the fact, for England, 
France, Germany and other countries have demonstrated it in a 
way that permits of no mistake. That we can build the right 
kind of vessels on this Coast is no longer to be doubted. The 
Charleston and San Francisco have settled that question. The only 
necessity that remains unsupplied is a bounty sufficient to ope- 
rate steam lines until they have been given time to develop a 
paying trade. It may be called a subsidy, subvention, bounty or 
payment for carrying mails. The quarrel about a name is neither 
here nor there. The thing wanted is the same by whatever name 
it may be called. With a little aid at the beginning, steam lines 
would soon become self-supporting, and thenceforward develop 
commerce rapidly and build up the city. It is to be hoped, there- 
fore, that the hard fight, now being waged in Congress for the 
passage of the Shipping Subsidy Bill, will be successful. The 
news of the adoption of that measure would be the most wel- 
come tidings that has reached San Francisco for many a day. 



STATE APPROPRIATION FOR THE WORLD'S FAIR. 

THE Legislature is asked to appropriate $300,000 for the repre- 
sentation of California at the World's Columbian Exposition. 
The request is reasonable. Director-General Davis has telegraphed 
the California World's Fair Association that space will be given 
for a California State building, and, with a creditable structure 
and an exhibit of resources, to be regularly replenished during the 
whole period of the Fair, the sum asked will hardly suffice. The 
reasons given by the local association why California should be- 
stir herself are timely and well put; and especially so when the 
eyes of the country are turned towards our State, in expectation 
of a display commensurate with our vaunted resources. Cali- 
fornia, with an area three times as large as England, has a popu- 
lation hardly exceeding one million, including men, women and 
children; therefore, to attract settlers, it is necessary to make the 
State known abroad. The older States are well peopled, and their 
character established; but the capabilities of the soil and climate 
of California have only been really demonstrated within the last 
decade. The country has passed through an era of mining to a 
partial realization of the marvelous resources of the climate and 
soil for the production of cereals, fruits, wines, raisins, oils, in 
quantity and quality sufficient to supply the world. In order to 
secure a wide and profitable market for these productions, Cali- 
fornia u ust be made known as a source of supply. It has also to 
be impressed upon the world, that an enlightened civilization has 
superseded "frontier rowdyism;" that universities, colleges, 
churches and learned societies adorn the land; and that the arts 
of peace have kept pace with the generous endowments of nature. 
There is now presented for this purpose in the coming World's 
Fair at Chicago, an unusual and striking advantage which we 
have the opportunity to embrace. The Fair will be visited by 
millions, and the press of the world will comment on the progress 
of the American States and the most recent achievements of man. I 
The States will be in competition with each other, and the United 
States against the world. California's exhibition in the variety 
and excellence of its productions should lead all others, and with 
the energetic assistance of the people this can be accomplished 
and the reputation of the State for ever established. Ample 
means should therefore be provided for the purpose. 



Jan. 17, 



' 



NEWS ! inn; 



9 



SHOT3 FROM THE MITKAILKV 

January 17, 1801. 

AW rcrj frequently debated, 

i* whether - t In Ita rolea, and mora lax 

1b it* araya than in -the pood old days," (*a quoted bj oar 
it may nol. therefore, be amn« to take a survey ol 
the aitnation. and calmly draw our dedw I 

Bren the moat onprejudlced observer roast allow that 
on ihe 1'aoitic Coast, and especially In San Pranclaco. is not con- 
trolled as in older com mo nit lea by any Mt forms. On the con- 
trary, composed ol so many conflicting elements, it hu assamed 
a way of its own. There is i ad leader, but each one 

whoae wealth or position enables them to live in n magnificent 
house, drive a fine equipage, wear Worth toilettes, ostrich tipa 
ItUdres, Is regarded as a feature >>i the swim. Large enter- 
tainments are given, where lavish decorations, Dne mosic and 
elaborate refreshments are provided, hut as to the culture and 
polish of a thoroughly well-bred and reBned society, candor must 
compel the confession, In that we are sadly lacking. 

Several reasons may be given for this, lirst of which is the lack 
of early training. In very many instances excessive wealth has 
come to those who. while excellent people individually, have not 
been capable of molding the manners or training the minds of 
their offspring. So the boys have been sent to colleges, whence 
they have returned skilled adepts in the art of spending money, 
but woefully deficient in the art of making it — boasting a knowl- 
edge of the world and it* ways but totally ignorant of the 
courtesies and polite convenances. Placing all women on a par, 
they treat those in society with the free and easy Camaraderie more 
fitted to a down-east village than a polished city drawing-room. 
The girls are sent to boarding school, where the principal lesson 
imprinted upon their minds (apparently) is a worship of line 
clothes and an independent habit of not only forming but ex- 
pressing strong individual opinions, alike careless of friend or foe 
in so doing. In short, both boys and girls are developed into sel- 
fish beings, unaccustomed to the beauty and duty of a home 
bringing up. They have very little, if any, love for the domestic 
circle. The great ambition of the girl is to make a rich mar- 
riage and have a minage of her own. The youth's aim in life is 
to get as mnch pleasure out of life as the city can afford him. 
The real gentlemen of society are, unfortunately, but too often 
men of small means, who have to endure much that is wounding 
to pride and feelings, in order to keep apace with the swim. 

The question of whether a chaperon is a necessity, is, we 
think, answered in itself when considering the material of which 
" society ' life is composed. San Francisco is yet young in what 
the French call savoir faire. Knowing what to do, and what to 
leave undone, is only acquired by experience, and until our social 
system is settled upon a hrm basis, that experience will not 
come. A society which is as shifting as the sands of the sea, may 
not hope to achieve a lasting reputation for possessing the con- 
comitants requisite for a polished salon. Until intellect, educa- 
tion and refinement cease to be valueless in comparison with 
great wealth, we cannot hope for a change in the situation. 

* » * 

It is remarkable how society people vibrate, like the pendu- 
lum of a clock, between this city and New York. At one time 
a regular hegiera begins, and it would seem as though our social 
ranks were to be depleted of their most important members; and 
then, presto! change! they all come back again. 

* * # 

The latest on dit is that the Fred. Sharons have gone East to 
settle up, close out the New York residence, and rame back to 
their native heath " for good." Whether this is due to the charm 
of cliruate on this favored Coast, the more limited field and con- 
sequent larger individuality, the presence of a large family con- 
nections, the delights of mandolin music, or beaux yeux. Quicn 

sabef 

* * * 

So it is fair to suppose the country place at Menlo Park will be 
built and inhabited, and that pretty little settlement shine forth 
again in all its pristine glory of swells in urbe. The Rathbones 
will doubtless take possession of the Atherton family mansion 
this summer, and the Floods will be back; the Jack Parrotts are 
looked for in June, and the Donahoes are expecting a visit from 
some of Eugene Kelley's family. 

A scene at the Baldwin last week during one of the perform- 
ances of the Juch Company, was much enjoyed by a gentleman 
in the near neighborhood of a private box. The box was occu- 
pied by a merry theatre party, and among the number were a 
pretty brunette and a slim blonde, each bent upon securing the 
attention of a medium-sized gentleman attached to the party. He 
turned from one to the other, until the dark-eyed girl broke her 
fan, when he stooped to replace the broken fragment in the 
owner's hand. She could not resist repaying him for his divided 
allegiance, apparently, as she laughingly requested him to keep 
it, saying, " I give it to you, but for mercy's sake don't show the 
white feather the next time you go out with us girls." 



Dr, Jekyl and Mr. Hyde," 
made Its ep] ,. -. \d\n§ pontic, peopla po 

and said, •• bow like (bat might be t.. m and so?" tftcfa one feeling; 

ounterpart among their acquaintances 
the type exists In oar own fair olty the residents ol a certain 
ly far out In the Western Addition are ready to ihow, aa 
one of oar prominent citlsens, who is in appearance a man ol 
bm< llty and probity and ■ tender parent, pi ay a a dual r6U 1 1.< 
uentlysesn In thai vicinity taking his walk a abroad In 
company with a young Miss, who is certainly not his strikine- 

looking daughter. 

Quid Nunat an- taking oddfl thai one of our belles, who is noted 
not alone for beauty but a decided musical talent, has captured 
the young medico who dwells In New York, it is an open secrel 
that the match would be an acceptable one to the parents on both 
sides. But it Is equally well-known of the young gentleman 
that be has always shown an aptitnte for pleasing himself, irre- 
spective of monetary considerations. 

Mrs. Cool, dentist. Room 10. Chronicle Building— All branches of 
dentistry practiced ; cleaning, polishing and beautifying the teeth a 
specialty. 

Rainbow Crepe Kimonos at Marsh's, under Palace Hotel. 




Sanborn, Vail & Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

lE'oitla.nd. and Los -A-ng-eles. 



Finest Materials for the Use of Artists! 

Oil C ilors in Tubes, Water Colors 
in Cakes, Moist Colors in Tubes and 
Pans; Water Color Liquids, Mediums, 
Oils and Varnishes in Bottles. 

Brushes for 4*11 and Water Color Painting:; Can- 
vas, Academy Boards, Sketching Papers, Gold Paint, 
Materials for China Painting, Pallettes, Easels, 
Studies, Hand Books on (lie Fine Arts. All other 
Articles used by Amateurs and Artists. 

Wholesale and Retail, 857-859-861 Market St., S. F. 

M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 




RUBBER CLOTHING, 
UMBRELLAS, 

WOOLEN UNDER- 
WEAR SUITS. 



MACINTOSH AND CAPE COATS! 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO., 



924 to 930 Market Street. 



Seven Sutherland Sisters 

SCALP CLEANER 

Is the only Dandruff Cure. For; 
Shampooing it has no equal. 

Prices— Hair Grower, $1. Six . 
bottles for$5. Scalp Cleauer, 50c. 

For sale by the Seven Suther- 
land Sisters aud all Druggi&ts. j 

Seveu Sutherland Sisters, Sole \ 
Manufacturers and Proprietors, - 
8311 Market St. ( sau Franc !sc\ Cal. ' 

Main Office, 18 West Fourteenth 
street, New York. 
No charge to see the Seven Sutherland sisters. Consultation free • 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 




NEWS comes from abroad of the turtle doves who not so long 
ago gave 'Frisco the slip, married in New York and thence 
went to Europe, that broad field for lovers, married and single. 
We recall the bruised hearts that the charming Mrs. Tiffany left 
behind to mourn their loss, also to wrestle with creditors for 
flowers and presents bestowed upon their fickle inamorata — but 
she whom Yznaga was so willing to dispense with found her 
heart's desire in the arms of the du?ky and artful Tiffany, who, 
having exhausted his own resources and those he could command 
of his friends, went into matrimony as a kind of investment, and 
a very profitable one he has found it, until just about now. They 
do say that he and Madam have gone South to "fresh fields 
and pastures new," as the patronage of her best friend, Mr. "Her- 
ald" Bennett of the New York James Gordon, has been with- 
drawn. What fights there will be in that dove-cote until another 

rich friend turns up. 

» # * 

What a fad the new style of serving grande dinners is becom- 
ing. We believe it originated in China; at all events it is destined 
to become popular out here, because it's a novelty. The soup 
and fish are served in the breakfast room, the entrees, roast and 
salads, etc., in the dining-room, and then, amidst an elaborate 
decoration of flowers, fruits and birds, the dessert is served in one 
of the drawing-rooms. All this is considered very recherche, es- 
pecially the last act, where the costumes of the servants are cor- 
respondingly elaborate, and consist of knee breeches, pumps and 
powdered wigs. 

# # # 

There seems to be a wholesale slaughter lately of faithless 
wives and disappointed lovers, etc. How utterly stupid and un- 
pbilosophic; surely, a man or woman should be only too glad to 
be rid of an uncongenial partner. If all are to be slaughtered who 
forget their marriage vows, there will be no need of divorce courts, 
and many a good fee will escape the ambitious divorce lawyer. 
Why cannot this world reform itself, and men and women be 
good and true? Then there would be no need of pistols or di- 
vorces. 

» # # 

Apropos of all the suicides at Monte Carlo, recently, we note the 
growing craze for gambling in all its phases in our city. In some 
of the swellest houses on Nob Hill there are regular poker and 
roulette games going on continually; such has also been said of 
certain rooms in our big hotel. It is astonishing the great extent 
to which these games are carried on among the wealthy, and the 
many young people fascinated with it. Our best clubs, they say, 
have the same facilities. But for those outside the pale of society 
or clubdom, it is next to impossible to find a " respectable gamb- 
ling den I" 

* # # 

An awfully good story is told of one of our Four Hundred 
swells, who in order to pay his tailor for a new dress suit or- 
dered for a cotillion borrowed his sister's diamond ring, carried it 
to a pawn shop and making the necessary riffle went to the ball 
in great shape. Oh, Edward, to think that you would do such 
a thing as that! 

» » * 

That irrepressible song-bird Mrs. Washington Berry, whose 
name is quite as long as herself, seems to have made herself con- 
spicuous lately at Monterey. Mrs. Berry is the daughter of the 
late General de Russy, and one of many sisters. She married 
this little man Berry, who scarcely tips her shoulder blade, much 
against the wishes of her family. Indeed there was a great scene 
at the house in South Park — all sorts of theatrical effects in the 
way of weepings and pleadings without avail. Her heart was 
set upon Washington Berry, the little n^an with the big name, 
and the tall Miss Laura insisted upon possessing both. At one 
time she shared the affections of a little tenor minstrel singer 
with that stately matron of Rincon hill, who was »• boss " for so 
long of the little church on Howard street. They say the lady 
of diamonds and garnets came out ahead, and here at this late 
day, after all these years and years, the Lady Laura, of Eiffel 
Tower height, comes tripping forth to do the great society musical 
act at Monterey. Old, Resurrection t ! 
* # * 

Another South Park belle in those same old days was the tall, 
graceful Ethel D. She married — and found relief some years 
later from whatproved to be an uncongenial alliance in the divorce 
court. In Hans K. she did not rind her ideal and dame rumor 
has it that she has tried ever since to find her affinity "some- 
where, anywhere" in this wide world. The gossips say that 
Danny has lost his gentle little heart in that direction. We hope 
not. 



We note the projfbted departure of Mrs. Dougherty for the 
East via Panama. Should she be going abroad we might suggest 
the "Allen" line of steamers. 

» # * 

How sad that Frank Unger is to "pass the winter at Sacra- 
mento." What will our "400 or 4,000" do without that great wit 
and learned savant to keep them forever amused and entertained. 
Unger is so deep, so cultivated, so unlike the wearying song-and- 
dance man that society abounds with, slang is vulgar and awfully 
catching — popular too — but this great man who has made for 
himself an international reputation as being a — well, anything 
you like — never descends to it, he must bore his patrons im- 
mensely. 

» ■* * 

Pity for the poor girl who went astray lately on apples and 
cigarettes. Wonder which vice it was that took her off her hooka 
mentally. And how many of our society girls who have this fancy 
for cigarette smoking will give it up now, in the face of this warn- 
ing? I was going home one night lately from a reception, and 
met a party of six of our swellest Four Hundred, all of whom 
were smoking cigarettes and carrying on in the most boisterous 
fashion. One I noticed for her classic blonde beauty, another as 
a dashing married flirt, an eastern importation, and the other 
an ordinary, every day society girl. The men were all club men, 
and the place they had just quitted, at the unseemly hour of 3 a. m., 
was a well-known French restaurant, where onecan always have 
a cabinet particulaire. 

* * ■* 

We do not hear much of the Earl of Stokes this week. He 
seems quiet, and has offered no new suggestions to society that 
are recorded. 

* * # 

Dimmock also seems quiet; being engaged seems to produce a 
soothing effect upon his natural restlessness. At this rate, what 
will become of him when he marries. We shall never hear of him 
then. It is with pleasure we note the new Van Dyke he has 
grown, and the free-from-care stride he affects. There's nothing 
like matrimony or matrimonial expectations. 

* # * 

Once upon a time 'Frisco boasted a lovely woman who pos- 
sessed position, youth and beauty, but for all the loving care be- 
stowed upon her she was decidedly "fast." She was protected 
to a certain extent by living at home, but she possessed the mys- 
terious little latch key that opened the family portal at her com- 
mand. This went on for a long time ; sometimes a brunette compan- 
ion shared these stolen rackets, sometimes a married lady friend of 
the family, sometimes she went alone, always giving plausible 
excuses to her family when her absence was discovered. At last 
a great spree at the old P. D. occurred where Miss Propriety dis- 
tinguished herself — by getting very full and walking down stairs 
into the main salon with another fast society woman, in whose 
company she was dining. This, and various other sprees, soon 
reached papa's ears, and daughter was inarched off to the south- 
ern part of the State, where she soon made the acquaintance of a 
very nice fellow who fell in love with her. The sequel to this is 
that they were recently married with much style, etc., and while 
the bridegroom is living in a fool's paradise, the hoys, who aTe 
"on," are saying how very clever she was to manage it all so well. 



B 



UY Jos. Tetley & Co.'s " Elephant" brand of Ceylon and In- 
dia Teas in lead packets. Unadulterated, fragrant, delicious. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 




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Jan. 17. 1891. 



BAN n: VNCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE KAILROAD8- 

A 1.1. the WrMern roads hm< porl of thi t'om- 

mltlwof M»nu i:.- (rc« truuportton, and ihrplan 

mended 13 now in full ' '. i provider flint an- 

nual or lime passes shall not It Issuad l«» •mployaafl "( foreign 
roads in train service. giAtlon or trfltllc departments. UO«pt upon 
the request of the proper ■ ■:' s \ 904 h road- , thai annual half- 
fare passes shall be good only in one State — the one In which the 
holder reside*; that annual time nr single trip passes shall not be 
teamed to World's Kair Commissioner! or to represents. Uvea of 
street car or cable roads, to agents enpsged in the sale of ooeJ «>r 
other commodities to the roads, to '-rand Army people or to any 
Dnitcd Stales army officers, except Ibe eoimuander of the depart- 
ment of the Missouri or his Immediate staff. 



Says the Tacoma Ledger; Articles of incorporation will prob- 
ably be filed in a short time for a railroad to run from South Bend 
to Colfax. The Lodger is not at liberty to give the names of the 
parties, but can say that the company will be composed of a 
number of leading railroad men of Washington, and that the road 
will run in the rough on this route: From South Bend, to Cbe- 
halis; thence striking the Cowlitz river and up to its source, 
thence to North Yakima; thence across the Columbia at Priest 
Rapids to Colfax. The road by this route will be practically 
across the State, and will tap the rich wheat fields of eastern 
Washington. 

An interesting case has just been decided against the Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa F6, at Marion. Kan. A man named Dwelle 
failed to purchase a ticket, and was ejected from the train for re- 
fusing to pay the usual excess fare. He claimed that he was un- 
able to procure a ticket, and brought suit against the company 
for |20,000 damages. He was given a verdict for ?4, 600, which 
was reduced to $"2,000 by the Judge. The plaintiff secured a new 
trial, and a second trial resulted in a verdict for only $G50. This 
verdict was reversed by the State Supreme Court, upon the ap- 
peal of the defendants, and a third trial was concluded December 
"25th. Dwelle being given damages to the amount of $281.35. 

One of the great undertakings of the year will be the extension 
of the Great Northern Line from the summit of the Ilocky Moun- 
tains to the Pacific Coast at Seattle on Puget Sound. Already 125 
miles of the extension from Assinabotne, Mont., to the summit 
are completed, having been opened during the year just closed, 
and the contract has been let for building the extension across 
the mountains to a point beyond the Kootenai River. About 500 
miles are yet to be built, and that for the most of the distance 
over a difficult country, involving a heavy expenditure of money. 

The Financial Chronicle says : After the trials which the railroads 
have experienced in recent periods, it seems almost incredible 
that any person having a fair knowledge of current events should 
charge that Western railroads are thriving at the expense of the 
general public. Yet the Attorney General of the State of Nebraska 
has, within a few days, made a charge of that nature. In his re- 
port to the Governor of the State he bitterly assails railroad cor- 
porations and railroad management, and advocates very radical 
and harsh treatment of transportation interests. 

The Chamber of Commerce last week notified the agents of all 
roads having Salt Lake connections that, hereafter, all freights 
billed to and from that city would be routed over lines designated 
by the chamber's transportation bureau. This action is taken on 
account of alleged discriminations against Utah points by the Un- 
ion Pacific, which has issued a new tariff sheet materially favoring 
Montana points, both on passenger and freight rates. It is pro- 
posed to enforce a rigid boycott against the Union Pacific unless 
the tariff is equitably amended. 

The Southern Pacific Railway, after endeavoring for years to 
get a union depot at San Antonio, Texas, will build a depot of its 
own. A contract has been let for a two-story brick structure, oc- 
cupying a space of 300 by 60 feet, and to cost $55,000. It will 
contain all necessary offices and modern waiting rooms. The de- 
pots of the trunk lines centering here are all on the outskirts, 
more than one mile and a half apart. Work on the Southern Pa- 
cific structure will begin in February. 

A Tacoma dispatch states: The Union Pacific and the Great 
Northern have joined hands, and are jointly interested in the 
building of the extension of the line from Portland to the Puget 
Sound. This fact has been practically admitted by representa- 
tives of both lines, who are now going over the lines as mapped 
out by the Union Pacific. 

Han is an ingenious animal, and can do many things remarkably 
well, but in undertaking to correct the errors of creation he does not 
always succeed. But Messrs. J. M. Litchfield & Co., the merchant 
and military tailors at 12 Post street, can correct any error in the con- 
tour of the human form divine, by the style of garment made for their 
customers. 



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The only hotel in San Fraucisco that has sun in rooms eutlre day. This 
is the only strictly first-class hotel in the city. Magnificent appointments. 
Unparalleled in beauty and brilliancy. Unquestionably the most beautful 
and luxuriously furnished hotel in America. Rooms eu suite with baths 
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convenience for comfort of guests. Most centrally located, being in the 
midst of amusements, art galleries, shops and other places of interest. 

Its euisineia of a peculiar excellence. The best and handsomest Res- 
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124 SANSOME STREET, S. F. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 




PUGILISTIC— It was less than a year ago that the News 
Letter published this statement: 

"Neither Jack Dempsey. George LaBlanche or young Mitchell have any 
right in the same ring as Robert Fitzsimmous." 

That statement was proven correct as far as Dempsey is con- 
cerned at New Orleans last Wednesday night. Robert Fitzsim- 
roons met Dempsey there for the middle-weight championship 
of the world and a $12,000 purse. Dempsey was " not in it from 
the start," as the saying is. Fitz out fought him in every pos- 
sible way, and knocked him out in the thirteenth round. Dempsey 
was knocked down eleven times and fell four times in trying to 
avoid punishment. He was greatly disfigured during the fight, 
and at the close of the battle he was carried away to his dressing- 
room limp, unconscious and bleeding. Fitzsimmons did not 
show the slightest sign of punishment. 

Colonel A. Brewster officiated as referee. 

There is a proposition on foot to match Fitzimmons against 
James Carroll, of Brooklyn, N. Y. The latter weighs 170 pounds. 

ATHLETIC— At their last meeting, held a couple of days ago, 
the Directors of the Olympic Athletic Club decided to include 
other events in their annual tournament, to be held beginning 
February 19th. They will be: 

Indoor Events — Horizontal bar, parallel bars, side horse, long 
horse, buck, rings, fence vaulting, rope climbing. Outdoor 
Events — One hundred yards' run, one-mile run, running broad 
jump, running high jump, pole vault, putting the sixteen-pound 
shot. 

The outdoor games usually held on Washington's birthday will 
come off on Monday, February 23rd. The Market Street Cable 
Company will issue fifty cent tickets, which will admit the holder 
to the grounds and a ride there and back. 

The resignation of E. A. Rix, as Vice-President, was accepted, 
and he was appointed the official representative of the Pacific 
Coast Amateur Athletic Association. 

N. E. Holloway was elected to fill Mr. Rix's position, and A. C. 
Forsyth was chosen to fill the Secretaryship formerly held by Mr. 
Holloway. Vandalia Stow was made a director of the club. 

The entries for the wrestling tournament, to begin on the 22nd., 
will close nest Monday. 

ROWING.— The South End Boat Club have installed the follow- 
ing recently elected officers: J. J. McCarthy, President; 
George Heisner, Vice President; William Haniver, Recording 
Secretary; John Traynor, Financial Secretary; A. J. Melletz, 
Treasurer. 

Arrangements were perfected for a complimentary social to be 
held on Saturday evening, the 24th inst., in B'nai B'rith Hall. It 
was stated that the four-oared racing barge being built for the 
club in Vatlejo at a cost of $425 would be completed by April 1. 
Several applicants were initiated as members, and thejclub was re- 
ported to be in a prosperons financial and social condition. 

SKATING. — In the mile skating contest last Tuesday night, at 
the Olympian Rink, Frank Delmont beat J. S. Snowden about 
two feet. The time was 3.03i, the fastest record made in this 
country. The race was for a purse of $1,000 and the champion- 
ship of America. There was an additional side bet of $100 made 
by the contestants just before the race. There was an unusually 
large number of skaters and spectators present to witness the 
contest, and there was a good deal of crowding and pushing when, 
at nine o'clock, the floor was cleared for the race. Thomas 
Pendergast was chosen referee. Snowden is the long-distance 
champion, it being only a week or two ago when he rolled up the 
surprising record of 295 miles in twenty-four hours. Delmont 
has been, and is still the short-distance champion of America, 
though last Tuesday night he lowered the best record of 3.06J by 
three seconds. The best world's record — made in London — 
is2.50£. 

A NOVEL method of contact printing, fferming phosphorus pho- 
tographs, has recently been described in Photographische Ar- 
chiven, based on the fact that yellow phosphorus under the influ- 
ence of light is converted into the red allotropic modification 
which is insoluble in carbon bisulphide. A solution of phospho- 
rus in this solvent is first prepared and poured over a glass plate 
or lithographic stone, and allowed to dry in the dark. It is then 
exposed to the light under a negative for about half an hour, 
when a faint red image is produced. Any unchanged phosphorus 
is then washed off the stone or plate by carbon bisulphide to fix 
the picture. Copper or silver images can be obtained from this 
by immersing the plate in a silver nitrate or copper sulphate solu- 
tion, when the red phosphorus reduces the metallic salt. If paper 
moistened with either of the above salts be pressed on to the 
plate the metallic image appears on the paper. Further experi- 
ments are necessary in order to see whether the above reactions 
can be used for the reproduction of pictures on a commercial 
scale. 




EUGENIE FACE POWDER. 



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Mrs. GKAHA'MS Eugenie Face Powder is deli- 
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aud is as harmless as a rose leaf placed against the 
cheek. In three shades— Cream-white, Flesh, and 
a very pretty new Brunette shade. Price 50 cents. 

Alt druggists keep it, or will order it for their 
customers. Sent by mail on receipt of postal note 
or stamps. 

Mrs. GRAHAM, " Peauty Doctor," 103 Post St., 
treats Ladies for all blemises or defects of face or 
figure. Superfluous hair removed by electrolysis 



DAUPHIN! DAUPHIN! DAUPHIN! 



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LADIES' HAIR DRESSERS AND WIG MAKERS, 14 Grant Avenue (over 
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for Hair Cutting, $3.00 worth for $2.50. Open Sundays from 9 a. m. until 1 P. 
m. Shampooing done with the latest Patent Washing and Drying Machines. 
Hair Dyeing and Bleaching also performed with care. Manufacturers of 
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No. 402 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Reference— Bank of California, San Francisco. 



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The next Term begins WEDNESDAY, January 7, 1891. 
For information address 

Mrs. C. T. MILLS, 
Mills' College Postoffiee, California. 



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Jan. 17, 1891 



PR tNCISCO Nl \VS 1 11 I IK. 



18 




New You City. January LO, 1801. 

TIIK budi and blomonis had but very Uttia time t«> raat their 
weary feet After the tec >nd i '.:- aroba' l>»ll at Delmonico'i on 
Monday evening, before it ws< necessary to don their ro 
dusting hue and arm themselves with fre-h I l aim< 

■miles for the Charity ball at the Metropolitan Optra 
House on the following night. If the ratriarcbV was voted an 
Inexpressibly dull atlair this season, and almost generally it was, 
it must yield the palm for absolute ■ireariness to the Charity. The 
fart that tickets for the latter are »n|d with almost universal pub- 
licity, ha." caused fond mammas who are credited with being in 
got swim, to exercise a due amount of watchful care that 
the tender chicks who have left the shelter of their wings for a 
brief period, shall not pick up detrimental social worms which 
might eventually injure their future prospects. The failure of 
the Patriarchs has been ascribed in a great measure to the irrita- 
bility nf Lord High Pooh-Bah McAllister, who literally gnawed 
his nether lip and what he could reach of his cherished imperial, 
with rage, because he was prevented from taking Mrs. Astor 
down to supper. This disappointment on the part of the fatuous 
founder of society, is all the more pitable from the fact that the 
supper was decidedly the best ever served at a Patriarchs'. The 
cotillion was led by Mr. Franklin Bartlett with no favors, but in 
which a great many popular figure*- were introduced. The cotil- 
lion was a long one and lasted until everyone had become heart- 
ily tired of it; it was to the relief of everybody when, at about 3 
a. m., general danciug was resumed. The ball-room was excep- 
tionally well favored this year with distinguished foreigners; of 
some of them I noted: The Marquis Imperial! of the Italian lega- 
tion; Mr. Alan Johnstone ol the British egation ; the Marquis de 
Choiseul; Mr. John Fraser, Mr. Victor Bowering, Captain Arthur 
Bradshaw, H. M. A., and Mr. Herbert Samuelson, of England. 

The Fifth Avenue seems to be a favorite hotel with Cali- 
fornia visitors. One of its guests at the present moment is 
Mrs. M. H. de Young, who is rapidly increasing her al- 
ready long list of New York friends ; her amiable disposi- 
tion and compact little form endearing her to every body 
she meets. Her four children are the pets of every one in the 
house, and seem to inherit the admirable caractere of their mother. 
Mrs. James R. Deane and Miss Mamie Deane are visiting her at 
present, but intend to return to San Francisco very shortly. Any 
amount of disappointment has been freely expressed by the 
numerous admirers of Mrs. George S. Ladd, the captivating little 
California widow, at the fact that she elected to spend the holi- 
days in Washington instead of in gay and giddy Gotham. Her 
social cllcntHe is so large, and those who pride themselves upon 
being included in it have been so accustomed to rely upon the 
attractive little widow's society, that all sorts of speculations 
have been rife as to the actual cause of her temporary transmigra- 
tion. They do say that evidence is commencing to accumulate, 
which would go a long way towards proving that Mrs. Ladd is 
not altogether determined to persist in remaining inconsolable in 
her widowhood; also, that there is a certain well; people al- 
ways will say that sort of thing about bereaved widows, espe- 
cially when in addition to possessing something like a cool mil- 
lion, the widow still retains a fair share of both youth and beauty. 
However, che sara, sara. Qui vivra, verra. Another source of 
regret to a multitude of New Yorkers, is the news which reaches 
us from San Francisco that Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon 
will remain for the winter in California instead of returning to 
their handsome and rcherche Fifth avenue residence, which has 
lately been entirely reconstructed for them. Mr. and Mrs. Sharon 
are renowned in New York as magnificent entertainers, and their 
absence and the absence of their enjoyable dinners and recep- 
tions will be greatly missed by all who have participated in their 
festive hospitality. 

# # * 

Mr, Lawrence Barrett in Ganelon, and Rosina Vokes in The 
Silver Shield, have been the two dramatic events of the week. In 
Ganelon, which is a tragedy founded upon a very trifling incident, 
by Mr. William Young, Mr. Barrett achieved what may be fairly 
termed an undoubted success, on the strength of his reputation 
and the place he holds in the affections of the play-seeing people. 
I don't think he ever received a more flattering, boisterous and 
spontaneous greeting in his life than that he met with on Monday 
night, when he stepped on the stage of the Broadway Theatre. 
As a play, Ganelon strikes you as a sort of minor or incidental 
work of a great and gifted writer. While there is little in it with 
which you can decidedly find fault, there is still less that you can 
declare has absolutely pleased you. The reason for this it is not 
easy to lay bare. Thp fact that no author has persistently dwelt 
with unnecessary emphasis upon many trivial details, and glided 
almost imperceptibly past roads that could have been made to 
lead to most important goals, is not enough to account for the un- 



itor, thht r Hswi Impoe* 

■Ibis of alimlnal -trait.. n. I <i«. not ttalni that either 

Mr. Young ror bis writing, nor Mr. Barrett for bisecting, were 
lastly sn titled t<> s tlorce of the ftpplaase and frsntl< 
of approval aceorded to them for their work on Monday night. 
It in significant ol the actual anoonl "f oritical appreciation pot< 
by the ordinary, theatre going, New 5fork publli , tfa 
it the Broadway Theatre, Mr. Booth and Mme. Uodjeska 
played together to miserably -Inn audiences, while Mr. I 

alone, in ;i new play of doubtful merit, is nightly packing the 

indltoriuni of the same temple, a whole n i <>f merriment, 

under the name of Tht Sliver Skidd* by Mr. Sydney Grundy, was 

the production at the Madison Square Theatre on Tuesday night. 
Mr. Grundy has succeeded in turning out a sunshiny, .sparkling, 
sea Foam sort of comedy, the seeing of which should be as grati- 
fying and soothing an event in the humdrum of one's life as a 
shower of rain to a parched plant. In the hands of such a come- 
as Rosina Vokes, assisted by the clever company with 
which Mi 88 Yokes always surrounds herself, it is not difficult to 
appreciate what an evening's entertainment can be extracted from 
B .sight of such a bundle of bon-bons as The Silver Shield. Rosina— 
jerky, jumpy, jingling Rosina, with the cavernous eyes and hone- 
less frame, flutters into and out of your sight with the same 
bounce and the same spasmodic gurgle as of old, in a role that 
suits her to a dot. Her individuality is one that does not belie 
its name; it is hers, and hers alone. Felix Morris, who has 
demonstrated that he can play anything, is afforded exceptional 
opportunities of displaying his unimpeachable versatility. He is 
almost tiringly funny. Mr. Ferdinand Gottschalk makes an un- 
qualified success of the part of an irascible London theatre man- 
ager. Mr. Gottschalk improves on acquaintance, and is now do- 
ing the best thing he has been seen in. During Miss Vokes' stay 
here, the new one-act play by Clyde Fitch, author of Beau Brum- 
mell, entitled Frederic LemaUre, will be seen for the first time in 
New York. Mr. Richard Mansfield, soi-disant conceiver of the 
character of Beau Brummell, is not in it. 
# « m 
The weather in New York is several degrees colder than the 
McKinley Bill. Skating is almost a parlor pastime. Babbler. 



PoisoN-oAKcuredbyiteele'sQrindeliaLotion. Twenty y ears 'experience 
has proved this remedy to be & specific. Apply immediately after returning 
from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be prevented. Jamks 
G. Steele & Co., 635 Market street. 



Rare Curios— Japanese works of art— at Marsh's, under Palace 
Hotel. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
Children while Teething. Price. 2. r i cents a bottle 

DRY MONOPOLE, 

(EXTRA) and 

MONOPOLE Club Dry (Brut) 

OHAMPAG-1TES. 
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Established 1785. 

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coutinuesto receive a limited number of pupils, who wish to receive pri- 
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SIZE 4X6 IN. 




(rom I), o street b 



■« break UwrImI 
■down. Hold 



INSTANTANEOUS HUE ALARM ! 

Buildings connected direct with the Fire 
Department under Franchise granted by 
the City Government. 

Premises equipped with this System are 
granted a reduced rate of insurance. 

Pacific Auxiliary Fire Alarm Co,, 

323 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



NEW YEAR'S AT THE RESERVATION. 

THE storm had raged for a week about Quenerno. A mantel of 
white covered the Agency Buildings. The Meritdezean was 
roaring, the water, even with its steep banks, dashing pell-mell 
to join the Kaw River miles away. Above, Salt Creek and the 
Hundred-and-ten were adding to the rushing waters. The dense 
wood across the bank was a study in black and white, with the 
great branches creaking and breaking under their load of snow. 

Thu road leading to Ottawa was blocked with drifts. In many 
places they were as high as the lowest branches. It led across 
the swollen river and through the woods, passing the treacherous 
ford at the Hundred-and-ten; to ford this after a storm in mid- 
winter was courting almost certain death. Now the boiling tor- 
rent was whirling logs and drift-wood down the stream, and the 
fence-rails, cut and piled along the banks by the occasional set- 
tler, added to the debris. 

Mr. Warner was the Agent at the Sac-and-Facs Agency. The 
Indians called biru Manopeokuck — "the man who writes." For 
six months he and his wife had been the only whites among this 
now peaceable branch of the Black Hawk tribe. 

It was Monday morning. Wednesday would be New Year's 
Day — a sad prospect for a happy opening of the new year. The 
thoughts of his old home on the banks of the Hudson, and of the 
Kentucky home of his beautiful young wife, where both had 
passed the last Christmas-time, brought a flood of tender memories. 

She was so ill now, and so far from friends and medical aid! 
What a prospect! No wonder the depths of despair showed in 
the man's face. He had just left her bedside, with no one to watch 
her wants but the good Indian woman, Papuosa — " she who 
gathers wild honey." The annuity accounts must be in readi- 
ness for payment day. 

" What troubles the Manopeokuck? " This was the salutation 
of young Keokuck, a stalwart buck of five and twenty summers, 
as Warner unlocked the office of the store building. 

"Come in and I will tell you." The Agent told the young In- 
dian his trouble — the danger of the doctor not coming from Otta- 
wa to-morrow on account of the impassable streams. 

The stolid face of the Indian showed no trace of emotion, but 
his reply spoke volumes. " I will bring the medicine-man by to- 
morrow noon." 

» But the danger, Keokuck ! I have no wish to risk your life." 

" I have the pony, Selim. I have no fear." 

# # » # * 
Monday night the storm broke afresh. The snow and sleet 

came with the driving force that only a north-east blizzard, 
sweeping across a Kansas prairie, can bring. The forest across 
the river whipped itself to pieces in a wild fury of remonstrance 
at the attack of the elements. 

Would Keokuck bring the doctor on the morrow? 

What a night of distracting thought! 

The morning saw the snow piled half way up the side of the 
house, and the little fence enclosing the place was not to be seen, 
while the fierce wind was blowing blinding clouds from the white 
shroud that covered dead, frozen nature. 

Twelve o'clock! No doctor 1 No Keokuck I 

A whole day of agony. 

The little supper of jerked venison and coffee lies untouched on 
the table. Warner is pacing the floor like a madman, while in 
the other room Papuosa holds the head of his meaning wife. He 
is wishing a thousand devils had his soul for bringing her here. 

Nine o'clock. The quick ear of the agent catches a sound. The 
snow has frozen hard except a few inches of fresh flakes on the 
upper crust. It is the quick thush-thush-thush of a horse's feet 
in the new snow, and in the instant that he is at the door Keo- 
kuch's Selim is there too. But he does not bear the Indian; it is 
Doctor Vedder. 

Good bourbon soon puts blood into his almost frozen body, and 
the doctor can speak. Together with the Indian he had come the 
sixteen miles through the forest until the seething Hundred-and- 
ten was reached, and there he had refused to attempt to ford it. 

" The ' woman-who-loves ' must live. Selim will take you there," 
and, swinging the butt of his rifle to his shoulder, Keokuck had 
forced the Doctor into the rushing mass of jvater. 

The sturdy pony never flinched. Now swept round and round, 
"now struck by drift-wood and floating brush he battled, and with 
success. 

God in heaven, what a night? 

* * * # # . 
The doctor and Papuosa are beside the sick-bed. 

The clock is striking two. It is New Years morning. 

The moans of the poor woman are heartrending. Warner is 
pacing the floor of the little cramped hall-way. Doctor Vedder 
pokes his head out of the sick-room door. " It's a girl, Warner," 
and there, in the middle of the floor, Papuosa holds the little New 
Year's caller in triumph. 

"Quenerno means 'good luck.' Manopeokuck, she will be 
beautiful." 

The storm lifts in the morning, as if to carry heavenward the 
thankful prayers of two loving hearts. John Ceaig. 



A Bolted Door 

May keep out tramps and burglars, but 
not Asthma, Bronchitis, Colds, Coughs, 
and Croup. The best protection against 
■ these unwelcome intruders is Ayer*s 
Cherry Pectoral. "With a bottle of this 
far-famed preparation at hand, Throat 
and Lung Troubles may be checked and 
serious Disease averted. 

Thomas G. Edwards, M. D., Blanco, 
Texas, certifies : " Of the many prepa- 
rations before the public for the cure of 
colds, coughs, bronchitis, and kindred 
diseases, there are -none, within the 
range of my experience and observation, 
so reliable as Ayer's Cherry Pectoral." 

John Meyer, Florence, W. Va., says : 
" I have used all your medicines, and 
keep them constantly in my house. I 
think Ayer's Cherry Pectoral saved my 
life some years ago." 

D. M. Bryant, M. D., Chicopee Falls, 
Mass., writes : " Ayer's Cherry Pectoral 
has proved remarkably good in croup, 
ordinary colds, and whooping cough, 
and is invaluable as a family medicine." 

Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer 8c Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Bold by all Druggists. Price $1 ; six bottles, $5 



ST. MATTHEWS' HALL, 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS! 



Twenty-fifth Tear. Easter Term commences Thursday, January 8, 1891. 

REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M, A., Rector. 



TYLER HALL. 



Preparatory Department of St. Matthew's Hall, San Mateo, California, 
FOR YOUNG BOYS. 



Easter Session will commence THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 1891. 
For catalogues and full information address 



REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Rector. 



The Strathmore Apartment House, 

N. W. corner Larkiu and Fulton Streets. 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR FAMILIES. 

First-class in every respect. Elevator day and night. First-class Restau- 
rant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor iu the building, or to A. HA YWAKD, No. 224 Cali- 
fornia Street. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

A QITIBT HOIMCIE, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

Miss Ellen Coursen. o Mr. Joseph Roeckel. 

vocal coirsT'SiEiEerv.A.TOiEair, 

820 POST STREET. 
Private Lessons and Classes Resumed. 



Jan. 1 




NEWS LETTER. 



ie 



F'K dlnotr -:-.-•-- '.-.■.-■ - .irr*njj«d with silk, 5»lin ind l<m- 
cade in many novel and origin il w ays, but. in almost every 
■lie underlying Idea of i In- ■■■■ • r and under drasa la retained. 
The shades now approved bjfasb! n— the deep blow, browns and 
amethysts — are teen at their i • • t, And can be con) 

with most ol the UghleT colors, brown especially being • iually in 
harmony with bine, pink and I ol yellow, a charming 

mingling of amethysl tone?, whi h roealla the coloring of ■ | 

i a front of heliotrope, bro< tded beevtlj with gold. Over 
this falls a train of purple velvet lined with lilac satin, and CAUghl 
up in pleats on the hips. The •■( velvet la laced over ■ 

tightly lilting bodice of brocade, and has the corners turned back 
sharply to show revera of satin, and (rills of chitTon fall round the 
shoulders and from the elbow sleei 

A French gown has the under dress of sky-blue satin, brocaded 
with colored flowers, and over it iy worn a Princess robe of golden 
brown velvet, which i? cut out on the bodice and sleeves into 
quaint, fanciful designs, outlined with gold thread and revealing 
glimpses of the blue beneath. Black lace and net are draped over 
light silks, and quilted nets with a black ground are used over 
black satin for dress fronts, with trains and bodices of black vel- 
vet or brocade. 

Many pretty ornaments are to be fonnd for the hair, chiefly in 
the form of fillets, to encircle the Grecian knots which continue 
to adorn most heads, in spite of repeated rumors of a revival of 
ringlets and drooping bandeaux. These bands of (lowers, velvet 
or gold and silver, are becoming enough to a well-shaped head, 
but the severe lines have a tendency to accentuate the defects 
which this fashion brings into prominence. 

Ih fans there is little novelty. Ostrich, marabout and other 
feathers mounted in a variety of ways, gauze covered with frills 
of chiffon, and the floral fans, in which an enormous chrysan- 
themum, peony or poppy covers almost the whole surface, are 
most frequently seen. A flower-holder has been devised which 
may be fastened to the outer sticks, and in which natural flowers 
to suit the dress may be arranged. 

New millinery is as " undecided " aa ever. No one need trouble 
about the shape. If it looks out of style bend the brim or edge 
into some angle or succession of angles, and no one will ever know 
that it is not the very newest thing out. A specialty is a felt bon- 
net trimmed with rosettes in three harmonious colors, two large 
ones being grouped id front and a smaller one at the back. 



The renaissance style asserts itself in the jeweled passemen- 
teries. Close woven gold and silver ribbons are worked in se- 
quins, and are in many different widths for girdles or bias bands 
that come from tinder the arm to the waist, but the prettiest are 
the floral and grass-like designs in which the " jewels " are sparsely 
used to form the flowers. 

The prettiest and most elegant trimmings are the appliques, and 
of these there is a wide range. Some are made entirely of beads, 
others and the more artistic ones are of white cloth exquisitely 
embroidered in colored silks of natural tints. 

Girdles are a feature of the season's fashions, those worn in me- 
diieval times furnishing the most popular form. They are made 
to encircle the hips, with long ends falling at the side or in the 
front to match the belts, corselets and Zouave jackets, which are 
laid on the waists and form a trimming in themselves. 

A girdle described is made with oxidized silver-tinsel cord, in- 
termixed with huge imitation pearl-like bosses; the huge buckle 
which closed the front was oxidized silver, and copied from one 
worn in Henry IV. 's time. 

Other trimmings, similar to the girdles, are shaped to the form 
of mantles, high collars, straight pieces going down the front, the 
side strips at right angles ending in wide pocket pieces. 



Wide yoke shaped pieces, all wrought in fine tinsel cord, have ex- 
quisite floral designs in natural colors. Gauzes for tabliers are 
worked with both silks and tinsels. 

The moat fashionable of the unset " jewels " are the opals so- 
called, any kind of a milky white or cloudylooking bead being called 
by that name; white and silver gimps are studded with turquoise, 
and coral is used on black. 

Favorite designs are apple blossoms and leaves and narcissus. 
They are so carefully applied to the fabric that they appear to be 
embroidered on the material itself. 



GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE! 

SWEEPING REDUCTIONS 

IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. 



OurRcroUr Annual Clearance Sale, now Id prosroa, »ir.>nl« an kx- 
( BPTIOMALLV FAVOKABLK OPPORTUNITY lot all who have unv prer 
tot op prospective need of Dry Goods, aa we b&vo madeadcep ami nn- 

■paring rn t In -iIh,im : |i,.ui Uii riinuliiihr of our until Fall 

nmi w iincrxKK it. r..r ii,.- purpose of disposing of everything u close), 

ilO, previous to "Mr nmiiisl Sl.irk taltliu;. 
All arc ivspi'riliilly Invltvil to call during this ureal ■aleand inapoot the 
I.Mrtuirillnnr} Biirsnlnn offered, which include the lufrxt NtylCH and 

HHIflllCN ill 

Ladies' and Children's Outer Garments, 
Black and Colored Dress Goods, 
Silks, Velvets, Laces, Gioves, 

Ribbons, Umbrellas, Trimmings, 
Handkerchiefs, Gents' Furnishings, 

Hosiery, Underwear, Corsets, 
Blankets, Flannels, Linens, 

Lace Curtains, etc., etc. 



Mail orders promptly aud carefully executed. Goods delivered free 
in Oakland, Alameda Berkeley and San Eafael. 




Murphy Building, 

MARKET AND JONES STREETS 

The Best o f All. 

THE ItT-A-TIOiT-A-Ij 

Transformer System of Incandescent lighting! 

Our Apparatus is of the Highest Efficiency, Mechanically 
and Electrically. 

National Direct Current Dy uamos for Isolated Lighting. Western Electric 
Arc Dynamos and Lamps. Racine Automatic Engines, Boilers and Oil- 
Burning Outfits. A full line of Electric Lighting Materials and Supplies. 

We are prepared to undertake the construction of Electrical Plants of 
whatever magnitude. Correspondence solicited. 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 
314 Calfornia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WOMAN'S HOSPITAL. 

THE CALIFORNIA WOMAN'S HOSPITAL, 

On Sacramento Street, 

Between. Baker aud Lyon, is now open for the reception of patients. 

There is a Free Ward, Pay Ward, and Rooms for Private Patients. Pure 

air, good diet, aud the best of nursing aud medical attendance are bestowed 

on all alike Out patients treated gratuitously. For admission apply at 

Hosp i taL 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

127 First Street, 

manufacture 

Boilers, Engines, and eve ry Description of Machinery & Castings 

SPECIALTIES: 

Hazclton Boilers, Wheelocfc Automatic flu I -oft' Engines, 

Dancan Concentrators, Baker Morse Power. 

Tra. P. Rankin, President. Willis G. Dodd, Vice-Pres't and Manager. 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., 

MBECHA1TT T^.ILOBS, 

622 Market Street, upstairs, opposite Palace Hotel, 

8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Many Novelties In Imported Wear. Nliirts to Order a Specialty 



J 



1€ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



don, the idea being, it is said, to pay oif the debts of the old com- 
pany and form a ne\%one with money enough to put in 80 or 
100 stamps with pans and settlers. 

i $ * 

THE local mining market for the week has been fairly active, 
with a weaker tendency towards the close. The North End 
st icks have been the favorites, and some nice turns have been 
made in Gould & Curry and Con. Cal. -Virginia. In the former 
property some ore has been struck in the upper workings, but 
what the discovery amounts to is still a matter of conjecture. 
Elsewhere work is going on the same as usual, with nothing new 
to report. The brokers have done a good business recently, and 
a number of members, who for some time past were conspicuous 
by their absence, have returned from farms and bog ranches in 
the interior, to become regular attendants at the Board. As some 
of these gentlemen have the reputation of being pretty well 
posted on the turn of events, their sudden change of front may 
augur auspiciously for the future of the market. The annual 
election of officers in the San Francisco Stock Exchange resulted 
in Mr. Shot well being again chosen for President, the motion be- 
ing carried by acclamation. The annual meetings of Crocker and 
North Commonwealth have been called for the 19th and 27th of 
the month, respectively. 

?* % 

THE decision of the jury in the case of Marks vs. Butterfield, 
must have been rather a surprise to people who have in the 
past pointed with a certain pride to the frigid dignity of British 
law courts. The same individuals sneer at the manner in which 
justice is at times administered in America; but if any rabble col- 
lected to sway a jury by sneering remarks or violent demonstra- 
tions, in any of our courts, even though it might be in a little 
semi-civilized frontier town, they would cool their heels in jail 
for many a day. No matter what the private life of Mr. Marks 
may have been in the past, it should have had no bearing on the 
question before the Court, as to the animus of the defendant in 
publishing the scurrilous pamphlet. Mr. Marks made a serious 
mistake in ever bringing a libel suit; he could have retaliated'in 
kind through the columns of his paper in a manner which would 
soon have turned the current of public opinion in his favor. As 
for the comments of the London press, they must carry little 
weight, when allowance is made for jealousy at the phenomenal 
success of one who can rightfully claim to have received his 
journalistic training on this side of the Atlantic. There is not one 
of these canting moralists who possess brains enough to compete 
with Marks as the manager of a newspaper, and they lack the 
courage to follow in his lead. So far as the charges of wrong- 
doing in stock manipulations made against Marks, there have 
been worse brought home to the managers of other London 
papers, and less said about it. The Financial News, however, is 
not likely to suffer much through attacks of the kind. Its proprietor 
is wealthy, and in no part of the world has money a greater 
power than in the immaculate city of London. 

5 $ I 

THE annual report presented at the meeting of the Barton 
Estate Company recently held in London has just been re- 
ceived. It does not make a very favorable showing for the 
year, but in this respect the company is not worse off than the 
other wine-growing establishments of this State. The past year 
has not been altogether favorable for the wine men, and many 
difficulties have been encountered calculated to reduce their 
profits. It is to be hoped, however, that the coming season may 
prove more productive, and enable them to recover the heavy 
sums which one and all in the business are out of pocket. 



AVERY important strike of ore was reported from Gray's Flat in 
Sierra County during the week the assays running as high, 
it is said, as $1,000 to he ton. This is nothing strange in the 
mines located in this vicinity. The Alaska property at Pike City, 
when it was worked, has turned out ore assaying away up into 
the thousands of dollars. The Young America has also produced 
extraordinarily rich ore, and the same might be said of several 
other properties in this justly-celebrated gold-bearing county of 
California. It only tends to prove that the mineral wealth of this 
State has yet to be developed. So far the surface has been scratched, 
and nothing more. 

** * 

WE view the editorial remarks of our London contemporary, 
the Financial News, in the light of a delicate rejoinder to cer- 
tain criticisms which have appeared in these columns on the 
management of the Richmond Consolidated. The statements in 
the article referred to are rather general, and totally unsupported 
by facts. The trouble with the Company is, as we have said be- 
fore, simply due to an unfriendly spirit which exists towards the 
Company owning the adjoining ground, and a disposition to re- 
frain from a connection which would lead to work on joint ac- 
count of great benefit to both companies. There is no earthly rea- 
son why the Richmond should not be as prosperous as the Eureka 
Con., with a change of policy. 




THE annual report of State Mineralogist Irelan has just been 
issued. It is, as usual, a highly creditable production, and 
for any one who perceives the large amount of valuable informa- 
tion it contains, and the number of subjects treated by master 
minds of the profession, it is proof sufficient of the valuable serv- 
ices of this valuable institution during the past year. Among so 
many able and well written articles, it would be invidious to par- 
ticularize. Suffice it to say that the report, as a whole, will com- 
pare favorably with last year's, which was generally admitted to 
have been the best ever published by the Bureau. But outside of 
the ordinary work performed in the field by Mr. Irelan and his ex- 
perienced corps of assistants, preliminary steps have been taken 
to make a thorough geological examination of the State, and a 
series of maps have been prepared under the management of H. 
J. Willey, ex-State Surveyor General, which shows that even 
this important branch has not been neglected. The amount of 
work which must have been done in this and other matters, 
speaks volumes for the ability and energy of Mr. Irelan and his 
associates. The appropriation allowed for the year appears 
small in comparison with results obtained, and the institution, 
with its valuable mnseum and librarv, is now a credit to the 
State which supports it. 

$ $ $ 

THE annual report of precious metals produced in the States 
and Territories west of the Missouri, prepared by J. J. Valen- 
tine, of Wells, Fargo & Co., shows a total gross result of $127,- 
166,410, against $127,677,836 for the preceding year. As fore- 
shadowed in the News Letter the gold production of California 
shows a considerable decrease for reasons given at the time, the 
product being in the neighborhood of $9,900,000. The produc- 
tion of silver was also very light amounting to $670,184. In 
ores and base bullion the returns aggregate $1,194,079, bringing 
the total production of the State up to $11,761,114. According to 
Mr. Valentine the returns from Mexico continue to show a 
steady forward movement, in full accord with the healthy pro- 
gress of mineral developments and mining interests in the United 
States. This result, he claims, is owing in a great measure to the 
liberal and friendly policy of the Federal Government of Mexico, 
which has afforded enterprises of the kind every reasonable en- 
couragement. The prospects for the future are also said to be 
very bright. 

IT seems probable that before long silver bullion certificates will 
be dealt in on the Stock Exchanges of this city. As the mem- 
bers of the two establishments now doing business here, the one 
in mining and the other in local stocks, are full of the project, a 
feeling of rivalry will undoubtedly lead to the introduction of this 
new and promising element in speculation. The proposition is 
to store silver bars not less than 997 fine and weighing 1,300 
ounces in banks, against which they will then issue for each bar 
a "certificate," subject to a storage charge of two cents per bar 
per day. The public will thus be enabled to employ their idle 
money to good advantage, with the satisfaction of knowing that 
the certificates of bullion will be prime collateral at all the princi- 
pal banks. There is one thing that the promoters of this enter- 
prise should bear in mind, and that is, that in making arrange- 
ments for negotiation of assays and deposit of bullion no favorit- 
ism should be shown. Any reputable firm in the assay business 
should be duly recognized, and the same in the matter of banks. 
Any attempt made to turn business into particular channels may 
create a disagreeable impression of jobbery, and thereby jeopar- 
dize the success of the venture. It must be a fair field for all, and 
no favors. 

$ ? $ 

A CORRESPONDENT at Holcomb Valley furnishes the News Let- 
ter with the latest reliable information from the Valley Gold, 
which has again gained some disagreeable notoriety in London. 
It appears that, since Mr. Pedley assumed charge of the pruperty, 
over $130 000 has been spent. The tunnel, when completed, came 
out as predicted, at two and one-half feet from grass roots. A one- 
half inch steel Hume was run from the mouth of the tunnel, which 
banked up and would not carry away the debris without the as- 
sistance of miners with their shovels. "And that," the writer 
remarks, » js called hydraulicking." Three reservoirs have been 
built, one of which is away back in the mountains, which are 
connected with the mines by pipes measuring from 14 to 22 inches. 
Speaking of the Black Hawk, it appears that there has been a 
general collapse in that— the latest of the Del Mar schemes. A 
ten stamp mill was put in, a road was built and water brought in 
a distance of 6* miles. The mill was run ahout one month, and 
then came a series of attachments, one for $4,000 from Los Angeles, 
for $2,000 from Victor and $5,000 for labor. What is due on mill and 
pipe line is not known, but it was bought on the " installment 
plan." Del Mar is now said to be "rustling " for money in Lon- 



Jan. IT, 1891. 



BAN PM INCI8C0 NEWS I ETTER. 




17 



,# Hc*rtbr »t the dcrll ftrtlhou*" 

"One that will pUy th< l- . «lr. with jrou." 

THE line* are so atrongly drawn now that the servants are 
thrown upon the resource* of the variable, batcher and gro- 
cerjman for that conversational arouaajnenl which they derived 
before from the drawing-room. The result of this is bloody rows 
ani Insane jealousies below stair*. • >ne day this week, a highly- 
fed butler attempted toaoffocate i pretty little wailinp-maid who 
had frowned upon the addreeaea of the autocrat. This assault 
tit due not so mncfa to love .-** to ■ er-feedlng. Cracked wheal 
and hominy are conducive to a mild and decorous regard for the 
other sex, corn beef and cabbage to a warmer feeling for those 
beautiful and attractive beings, but oyster patea and turtle steaks, 
washed down with Poiuuiery, not only play the deuce with the 
man's morals, be he butler or master, but so confuse his Common 
sense that it becomes a matter of indifference to him whether he 
choke;- or caresses the siren who ha-* won his affections. There- 
fore, those unfortunate people who own butlers should pay the 
strictest attention to their feed. To cram any menial with rich 
food induces a haughtiness and independence which is just as 
disagreeable under republican rule as under a nionarchial. And to 
permit a butler to guzzle in any house where maid-servants are 
numerous, is to expose the careless master to endless annoyance. 

THERE is nothing in the world more lovely than the demeanor 
of one of the old guard, when he has resolved to abandon bach- 
elor life and « de gang," and enter into the holy bonds of wedlock. 
I have before me a most beautiful e.\ample of late piety. He is a 
stout, hearty fellow, who could take his glass and troll a stave 
with the best of them. When he left court, all the musty busi- 
ness of the law remained behind in his office. He was a four- 
fingered man at the bar, and did not much care, either, how many 
he took of them. Time was no object to him as long as there 
were good fellows about. He was always the last to cry halt in 
the parsuit of pleasure. I saw him one day this week consuming, 
with a bad grace, be It said, lime-juice and ginger ale. In sooth, 
he is to be married. He has fallen into the snares of Cupid, and 
his days of bachelorhood are numbered. Soon the haunts that 
knew him so often shall know him no more. Vale, vale, leg of 
mutton and tea shall replace capon and burgundy, and the do- 
mestic piano the strains of harp and violin from Italy's wander- 
ing minstrels. Alas! all of us have kissed the painted bloom 
from Pleasure's lips, and found them pale as Pain's. 

IT is not every one who can turn an apparent misfortune to such 
good account as a gifted member of the fourth estate, who, after 
deep potations in tie fen heller, was landed in a prison cell. This 
bibulous person is notoriously seedy in his apparel. His 
imagination is exceeding rich, but his apparel is ever of the poor- 
est. In the cell with the author and journalist was a young swell, 
slim, well-dressed, but deplorably intoxicated. The author at 
once started an argument. The swell held up one side of it. The 
author challenged his companion to a fist fight, London prize ring 
rules, and insisted that both should strip to their under clothes. 
After a few passes the author insisted that they should change 
corners. This placed him by the swell's good clothes. The oppor- 
tunity was not to be lost. The man of letters promptly knocked 
his antagonist out, and invested himself in his fashionable gar- 
ments, while the victim snored upon the pile of ruined fabric 
which had once covered the author's bony frame. To-day he is 
one of the best dressed men on the street. The other party has 
not been heard from. 

SOMETHING must be done for the indigent ex-holders of office 
who now walk the stony streets, gaze upon our noble build- 
ings, and display a strong and persistent interest in the laying of 
foundations and the moving of safes. The Legislature might 
easily make an appropriation for a Statistical Bureau, and have 
all the cobble-stones on the various blocks counted at so much a 
day. Or some of these unfortunate unemployed might be sta- 
tioned along the shore line to take notes of the rise and fall of 
the tides. Or to count the bottles on the shelves of the saloons. 
Or to enumerate the empty cans in the vacant lots. Some occu- 
pations they must have, or the belated pedestrian will run the 
risk of getting cracked on the head at every dark corner be 
passes. 

A MAN presented himself at the city prison the other day, and 
cooly informed the jailor that he was insane. If this candor 
were more general what a busy time officials would heve? From 
Pine street would advance a formidable regiment, mad, my mas- 
ters, as any inmate of Napa. Kearny street would contribute its 
quota of silly men and women, some plum crazy from the con- 
templation of their personal charms in the plate glass windows 
of the shops. The bench, the bar and the fourth estate would 
be represented. And then the question of commitment would j 
be denied upon the truism that it is only the wise man that knows 
he is a fool. 



THE Identity ol the indent who writes from 

ndon about the I'rlnos "f Wales, and who i- on the 
Inslds of nil ths n ami about Ihs Oonrl o! Bl 

ha" nt last become known. Observing readers have long sua* 
: that tola r -on bad no residence In England, 

but was In fact on the Great of tola city and 

Therefore, thai all these tales were ths offspring ol bis ferule 
Imagination, that he would not know the Prince ol Wales from 
Admiral Con. O'Connor, nor sir Morel Mackenzie from Dr. 
ru-li. Ths -« , ret I ■ oui Ben Clarke, 1 1 ■ •• au - i t tenor ol the anti- 
podes, Is the man. Mr. Clarke, In his atudy In Alameda, baa no 
hesitation, naj nor even the slightest difficulty, In writing np a 
State dinner at Windsor Castle, and giving an accurate and 
graphic account of u,< stumea of the guests and the de- 
meanor of Her Gracious Majesty. His connection with the 
British Benevolent Society, added to a naturally active brain ex- 
plains this remarkable gift. 

THERE ia war among the butchers. The men of the shops are 
down upon the peripatetic meat .sellers, and complain that 
hirelings of the latter get solid with the girl in the kitchen, and 
throw smiles and kisses to her. That's the way, quoth the com- 
plainant, that they win business, and ruin those butchers who 
own fixed shops, for which they pay heavy rent. This is the 
way of the world. The fair sex has something to say in all the 
atfairs of life. Now, the question naturally presents itself — may 
not a peripatetic butcher, lavish of smiles and kisses, impose the 
toughest kind of steaks and the stringiest of chops upon the 
blushing maid of the kitchen without comment or reproof V It is 
well known that between the butcher boy and the serving girl an 
affinity has ever existed. Those fellows who drive the meat carts 
with all the dash and elan of a Roman charioteer, are ever play- 
ing the deuce with the affairs of the kitchen. 

IT is dangerous to trust one's self to dinner with a newly- mar- 
1 ried couple when but a single chicken forms ihe piece de resist- 
ance, and the husband is still luny with love. I ventured upon 
the experiment the other day, and the results were awful. The 
groom carved, and the bride, whose appetite was marvelously 
healthy, got every part of the fowl worth eating. The only tender 
pieces of the celery fell to her. There was nothing left for the 
unfortunate guest but to fill up on bread. And she got all the 
crusty pieces. Then there was no smoking. Only spooning and 
sighing and hand-squeezing. That man must be taken out and 
kept all night at a poker game. It is the only chance for re- 
venge. 

J ROSS JACKSON has fitted up in his pleasant home on Cali- 
, fornia street possibly the most unique smoking room in the 
world. Its singularity does not consist in theluxurious ottomans 
for the smokers, nor the onyx tables on which the cooling draughts 
may rest ; but upon the fact that each pipe in his magnificent collec- 
tion is attached by a tiny, yet strong chain to a bolt in the floor. 
This Mr. Jackson found an absolute necessity. Not indeed that 
the majority of his guests would abuse his nicotine hospitality by 
walking off with his pipes, but a certain dashing blonde real es- 
tate man of the town has a fad for gathering in pipes, and it is 
chain or no pipes. 

YEAR after year the noble red man keeps on getting himself 
more and more disliked. There will be soon no friends left 
him but the Indian Agents, who generally draw rations for every 
savage of the reservation, multiplied by five, and religiously re- 
turn the difference to this all-confiding Government. The result 
of this honest policy is that those worthy fellows grow surpris- 
ingly rich in a short time, and when they return to Boston, from 
where they are principally extracted, love to express in tender 
words their admiration of the gentle traits of their former wards. 

GOVERNOR WATERMAN retired from office in a blaze of 
glory. Everybody is pardoned, and large gaps made in the 
State Prisons for the reception of new criminals. What a mag- 
nificent record, derisively speaking, that old gentleman has made. 
What a grand example of poetic justice it would be, should Mr. 
Waterman be sandbagged some evening by one of those inno- 
cent young men he has pardoned from the State prisons. 

THE Chinese have long claimed the title to being the closest 
economists in the world. But they are way behind the na- 
tives of New Hebrides who, after three of their people were 
hanged for killing a Frenchman and his son whom they after- 
wards devoured, begged for the bodies and had a big feast on 
them. The nearest we can get to that is to use the dust of our 
cremated relatives as a face powder. 

WITHIN the last year there has been growing up a sort of 
general admiration society among a certain coterie of news- 
paper writers. This, in itself, ia very innocent when not too 
heavily rubbed in. But when one considers that the public buy 
a newspaper for the news it is supposed to contain, and not for 
the glorification of this or that writer, this frequent slobber looms 
up in the light of a swindle. 

JHpIS sweet upon the man you like, 
X A little swag to lay; 
To talk about his reach and grit, 
And illustrate each mighty hit — 
But, oh, 'tis h 11 to pay. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flo'ir.good home and foreign demand; Extras ?4.20@$4. 30: Superfine, $3.00. 
Wheat, steady, good trade; Shipping, $1.37%; Milling, $1.40@$1.42J<£ per ctl. 
Barley, in I favor; Brewing, ?1.50<gi$l M; Feed, $1.43@$1.55 per ctl. 
Oats, Milling, fj.OOfei^.or.; Feed, *l>0@$1.90per ctl. 
Corn, White, 11 35; Yellow, $1. 30(0^1.:^ per ctl. 
Rye, light stock, gond demaud, -H.30@tl.35. 

Hay. free supply; Wheat, $14@$18; Oats, *I2@$14; AlfaHa.tl2@J13.50. 
Millstntfs, good demand. Bran, $22(oi.f'2:s per ton. 
Beans, good request, t2.75@t3.40 per ctl. Potatoes, 80c.@$l 2:5 per ctl. 
Butter is lower; Choice, 36c.@38c.;Fair, 25c.@30c; Pickled, 27}-c@30c. 
Cheese, light stock, 10c.@13c. Eggs, good supply, 26e.@28c. 
Honey, Comb, 13c.@15c. : Extracted, 6c.@7c. Poultry in good supply. 
Onions, $3(t$$3.25 per ctl. Beeswax is scarce at 22c.@25c. 
Fruit — all kiuds dried — active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 
Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 
Hides are lower; Dry, 7c@9c. Wool is in demand at 12c.@24c. 
Provisions move off'steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c.(§6\£c. 
Coffee steady at 20c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 
Coal is less firm, with a decliuing teudeucy. Nuts find ready tale. 
Quicksilver, slow of sale at $51.00 per flask. Hops are held firmly, 32c.@38c. 
Sugar, good stoCK of both Raws and Refined. Steady prices. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. report the receipts of treasure at this port 
during the year 18.90 at $18,589,398; in 1889 the receipts were 
$32,950,412. The receipts last year came from the following 
sources: Interior, $17,847,808; from North Coast, $741,590. Total, 
$18,589,398. Of the above $12,439,681 was coin; silver bullion, 
$3,085,671; gold bullion, $3,064,046. Total, $18,589,398. Coin 
receipts in 1889, 23,450,440; silver bullion, $5,047,636; gold bullion, 
$4,462,336. Total.l $32,950,412. 

Business, as is usual at this season of the year, is devoid of all 
life and animation. There is, however, a good steady outflow of 
Wheat to Europe, with rather a strong market for all grain. 
The present outlook is very promising for the future grain crops. 

The Pacific coast salmon pack, so far as cased fish i? concerned, 
is now officially declared to be as follows (the data includes that 
of British Columbia); Cases, 1889, 1,714,875; 1890,1,623,867. The 
Alaska pack is now placed at 688,332 cases for 1890, and in the 
year 1889 at 709,847. 

The recent cold snap has greatly increased the household con- 
sumption of coal, and in the long absence of imports of Austra- 
lian, stocks of foreign are running very low, thus checking the 
late declining tendency of prices. 

The steamship City of Peking, hence for the Orient on the 10th 
inst., carried in Treasure to China $157,219; to Japan, $50,000, 
making a total of $207,219. 

There is at present very rittle if any demand for Calcutta grain 
sacks — prices extremely low — stocks here and to arrive are large. 

Cement imports continues large and free, Our consumption is 
about 300,000 bbls Portland per annum, with a good spot stock 
and liberal supplies are en route, prices rule in buyers favor, say 
$2.25fo , $2.50 per bbl. At this low price there is not much induce- 
ment for the development of the local product. 

For the Colonies, the steamship Mariposa, hence on the 12th 
inst., had for cargo to Sydney, 990 Doors, 34,000 feet Lumber, 68 
pkgs. Leather, 2,574 cs., 1,810 ^-bbls. and 112 bbls. Salmon, 150 
bales Broom Corn, 52 pkgs. Machinery, etc., value $60,000; to 
Auckland, 553,870 lbs. Sugar, 210 bxs. Raisins, 62 cs. Canned 
Goods, 415 cs. and 5 J-bbls. Salmon, value $36,914; to Melbourne, 
300 cs. Salmon, 200 bales Broom Corn and Mdse., value $9,937; 
to Dunedin, 100 cs. Salmon, 2,118 lbs. Coffee, etc., value $1,177; 
to Brisbane, 550 pkgs. Codfish, 500 cs., 75 i-bbls. and 50 £-bbls. 
Salmon, 1,660 lbs. Seed, etc., value $4,448; "to Nelson, 1,982 lbs. 
Coffee, value $485; to Bluff Harbor, 100 cs. Salmon, value $440; 
to Wellington, 100 pkgs. Codfish, etc., value $351; to Port Chal- 
mers, 9 cs. Rubber Goods, value $272; to Apia, 10 bbls. Flour and 
7 cs. Millstuff; to Honolulu, 5,SG0 lbs. Tobacco, 250 bales Hay, 76 
bxs. Apples and Mdse., value $8,100. 

To China, per City of Pekin, 14,402 bbls. Flour, 8,439 lbs. Beans, 
6.45S lbs. Ginseng, 17,600 lbs. Sea Weed and Mdse., value $60,302. 

To Japan, per same, 776 bbls. Flour, 186 rolls and pkgs. Leather, 
22,500 lbs. Sugar, 1,000 sks. Salt, 645 lbs. Ginseng and Mdse., value 
$22,621. 

A large shipment of refined Sugar was made this week for Auck- 
land, per stmr. Mariposa, say 553, S70 lbs. from the California Re- 
finery, being the first shipment of the kind to the Colonies. 

Treasure carried to Honolulu consisted of $75,000 in Gold Coin, 
shipped by the Bank of California. 

The Pacific Mail S. S. City of Mew York sailed for the Isthmus 
on the 13th inst. carrying en route to New York 44,836 galls wine, 
1,205 galls brandy, 260 bales rags, 50 bbls glue, 4,908 ctls barley, 
18,363 lbs beans, 2,178 lbs beeswax, 10,885 lbs zinc,, etc.; value, 
$37,786. To Central America, 3,066 bbls flour, 137 M feet lumber, 
1,000 ctls wheat, 1,569 ctls corn, 70,930 lbs malt, 7,354 lbs tallow; 
45 cks and 168 cs beer, 2,000 galls wine; value, $40,517. To Pan- 
ama, 28,316 lbs sugar, 2,930 lbs rice, 2,890 lbs beans; value, $4,780. 
To Mexico, 1,600 galls wine, 7 M feet lumber, 50 M shingles, 78 
flks quicksilver, 400 pkgs beer, etc. ; value, $26,191. To Valparaiso, 
57 pkgs machinery ; value, $1,950. 



ZBj^nsriKis. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP. $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,000,000 

Southeast corner California and SanBome Streets. 
Head Office— 60 LOMBARD STREET, London. 

Branches— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver. Nanalmo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
jectto Cheek, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rateB 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND-Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of 8ydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

THE REPUBLIC SAVINGS, BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Incorporated and acting under the laws of California. Charter granted 
for 50 years. Authorized to issue 260,000 shares— par value, $100. 

Capital Subscribed $400,000, 

A. H. MACDONALD, President. Dr. CHARLES E. BLAKE, Vice-Pres't. 
Bank of British Columbia, Treasurer, 

San Fraucisco Office— 624 Market street. Oakland Office— 471 Ninth street. 
Certificates of Shares issued upon application, earning investor one per 
cent per mouth. All loans made on first-mortgage on real estate. Paid-up 
Stock investors respectfully solicited. Loans of $1,000 payable in raouthly 
payments of ?16. By-Laws, Prospectus and Circulars given upon application. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,540,000 OO. 

Deposits January 2, 1891 24,340,988 65. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, BDW. KROSE ; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGER8 ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, Chas. Meinecke, O. 
Schoemann, E. Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, M. Ehrman. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbqb. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D, Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Casnier. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL 11.000.000. 

DIRECTORS l 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN Vicb-Pbesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. op. Sansome and, Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $450,000. 
Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres &. Cie, 17Bonle- 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Managers. 

C. Altschtjl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed ... 3,000,000 [Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. FRED. P. LOW. } v.,,.™™ 

IGN. STEINHART, 1 Maiia S er8 - 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



BAN FN \MM>» NKWS I ETTER. 



19 




UNQUENCHABLE !». (Wl« JkWJtrty. 

My love is like the di my rose 
She wears upon her braMt; 

Her breath in like the wind that blows 

I*alm laden from the V 
Her smile." are like the sunlight shed 

On wavelets as they roll. 
And like the blue sky overhead 

Her purity of soul. 

Her generous thoughts are like the rain 

That fall? on high and low; 
Her kindly gifts to age and pain 

None but the wretched know; 
Her sympathies are broad as day 

And stormy as the night, 
And when there's darkness on the way 

Her presence sheds a light. 

Such were my thoughts when love was young, 

But now, when love is old, 
Each fancy of my pen or tongue 

Is silver turned to gold. 
I woo'd her in the morn of life, 

Ere yet by sorrow tried, 
But now I cherish her as wife — 

More than I loved as bride. 



GOD'S MUSIC. 



Since ever the world was fashioned, 

Water, and air, and sod, 
A music of divers meaning 

Has flowed from the hand of God. 
In valley, and gorge, and upland, 

On stormy mountain height, 
He makes him a harp of the forest, 

He sweeps the chords with might. 
He puts forth his hand to the ocean, 

He speaks and the waters flow — 
Now in a chorus of thunder, 

Now in a cadence low. 
He touches the waving flower-bells, 

He plays on the woodland streams- 
A tender song — like a mother 

Sings to her child in dreams. 
But the music divinest and dearest, 

8ince ever the years began, 
Is the manifold passionate music 

He draws from the heart of man! 



A MEETING.— London World. 



A meeting all too brief, and yet enough — 

Enough to change the color of my life, 
Weave threads of gold across its sombre woof, 

And arm me with fresh courage in the strife; 
Round that bright hour ray thoughts, like ivy, cling 

Years with their burden vanish at the spell 
Of that soft voice, and all my pulses ring 

With happiness too deep -for words to tell. 
What is the magic you have o'er me thrown? 

I feel its thrill within my inmost heart, 
Youth and full life once more I feel my own; 

Tell me, is this Medea's fatal art? 
No, nol a mightier power within you lies; 
1 Tis Cupid's self concealed in Celia's guise. 



MOLASSES.— Q. N., in Brooklyn Eagle. 



Words that are soft will turn away wrath, 
Not calling folks confounded asaes, 

Before using vinegar, pepper or gall, 

Just try something sweet, like molasses. 

Words that are hard make anger and strife, 
Whether taken alone or in masses, 

The easiest way to manage mankind 

Is to use something sweet, like molasses. 

You may search the land o'er 
From mountain to shore, 

Through solids and liquids and gases, 
But for troubles that rise 
And the catching of flies 

There's nothing so good as molasses. 



HANKS. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 



CapiUl 
Surplus 
Undividad Profit* 

Thomas Brown. 



»3.000,(»0n 00 

1.000.0:0 00 

2,091,608 76 
ittnl OfttltlM 



( July Ut, IBM)) 
wu \ idtni 

I'mMcMB. MfftRAY.Jr 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK- Annej ol the Bank of California: B03TOH— Tramonl 
National Bank. < Hli v,.> Union National Bank; 8T. LOUIH-Bnalmann 
Bank, nkw ZEALAND m« Hank ol Hew /.i-aiaiiii. Corraupondeni in 

Londou Me-T.-. N. M. Rothcehlld A Sons. OolTMpoadeata In India. China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank ha* Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondent!! In all the 
principal Mining District* »n<l Interior Town* <>( the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit Issued, available In all pa.rU of the world. Draw direct 
on New York. Boston, Chirago, Mt. Louts, New Orleans, Deuver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, , Lob Ingeles, London, DubUn, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort on -the Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italv and Switzerland. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



v W. i'orner SaiiMome anil ltnsii StreciM. 

Established 1870. U S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) $1,500,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $69,200 



8. G. MURPHY. .. 
JAMES MOFFITT , 

Geo. A. Low, 
N. Van Bergen, 
Jas. H. Jennings, 



. President! E. D. MOKGAN Cashier 

.Vice-President I GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 



DIRECTORS: 

George C. Perkins, 
James D. Phelan, 
John A. Hooper, 



8. G. Murphy, 
James Moftltt. 
J. D. Harvey. 



A General Bauk lug Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to ?100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A spetuidty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 



Authorized Capital ?3, 500,000 

Reserve 



Capital paid up 2.450,000 

345,000 



San Francisco Office, 424 California St. 1 London Office 73 Lombard St.,E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1005 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the worlds 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K.WILSON President 

J. L N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors : Chas. Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Dowuer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel &Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bauk. Loudon— Brown, 
dhipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Ccr. of Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Savings Bauk deposits received, and interest paid on same semi-annually, 
in January and July. Rates of interest for the LastThhee Terms: 5.58 per 
cent on term deposit and 4.65 per cent on ordinary deposits, free of tax. 
Deposits received from one dollar upwards. Open Saturday Evenings. 

"^WELLsTfARBO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS directors'; $5,000,000.00 

Lloyd Tevls, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford Cbas. F. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldrldge, Wm. Norrls, Geo. E, Gray 
and W F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issu.es Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban ki n 
BusineSH. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated.... November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



<I£5Lft£KFni 




T 1 



HI. real estate market shows no signs of rising above the season 
1 as yet. It is neither dull nor active, but seems rather to have 
fallen into the groove, which usually controls its movements at 
this season of the year. There is a certain quantity of regular 
business, which knows no season, and that would seem to be the 
brokers' mainstay just now. There is, of course, other business, 
mainly in outside lands and homestead lots, which, however, can 
as yet hardly be called a movement, such as it was ac one time 
during 1890, but would rather represent the leaven from which 
shall rise the movements which the year 1891 is expected to bring 
forth. So far there are few, if any, reliable indications what the 
year 1891 will offer in the way of real estate deals. That is to 
say as to results, and not as to atteiupts. As to the latter, the 
probabilities are that they will be numerous, especially in con- 
nection with the outskirts virgin land and in the matter of sub- 
dividing tracts. And it is also apparent that these attempts will 
be on a scale and in a style which hitherto has not obtained 
hereabouts, or that neither efforts nor money will be spared to 
make them successful. Success, however, will nevertheless de- 
pend upon such purchasers as come forward in response to the 
inducements offered, and any augury as to these depends upon so 
many collateral facts and circumstances, that the expression of 
more than an opinion, and a conservative one at that, even by 
the best informed, is all that can be expected. That opinion, 
however, is most favorable to an active market, which, indeed, is 
confidently looked for on all sides. 

Of immediate news there is a scant supply. There have been 
no sales, establishing new values or drawing attention to any par- 
ticular neighborhood. Among the regular week's grist there are 
sales as follows: 33:9x137:6 on the south side of Post street, 137:6 
feet east of Taylor; 23:6x87:6 on the south side of Sutter street, 
94 feet west of Mason; 22x57:6 on the south side of Sutter street, 
25 feet east of Powell and 33:9x-47:6 on the east side of Powell 
street, 57 feet south of Sutter, these last two lots being purchased 
by Senator Fair; also 45:10x66 on the northeast corner of Jack- 
son and Battery streets; 50x84:6 on the south side of Lombard 
street, 87:6 feet west of Stockton; 37:6x80 on the south side of 
Howard street, 142:6 feet north of Third street, $12,250; 75x120 
on the south side of Sullivan street, 83:4 feet east of Stanyan; 100 
xl37:6 on the south side of Frederick street, 300 feet east of Stan- 
yan; 56:3x100 on the southwest corner of Oak and Clayton 
streets; 103:1x127:8 on the southwest corner of Broadway and 
Octavia streets and 47 :6xll7 :G on the west side of Church street, 
117:6 north of Twenty-third street. In outside lands the larger 
sales include block 1143; block 736; the north 358 feet of block 
1053; block 1072; block 822; the north 225 feet of block 1282; 
north 232 feet of block 1283, and north 215 feet of block 1284. 

Block 1143, above specified, is bounded by S and T streets and 
Forty-first and Forty-second Avenues, and sold for $6,000. 

The new City Fathers have set to work with a vim to undo 
the questionable proceedings of the Solid Nine in relation to the 
purchase of Shag Rock, various railroad franchises, street exten- 
sion schemes, and sundry matters. This is as it should be. The 
community is with them, and no one regrets the upsetting of 
these matters except the few Bush street lambs, who expected to 
profit by them. Let the good work proceed. 

It is more than likely that during the present session of the 
Legislature several laws will be enacted, which will materially 
affect the present system of municipal governments. After many 
years of tests and trials, the Supreme Court has finally settled 
upon the doctrine that general laws control all special charters 
and enactments. Accordingly, the talent has been at work de- 
vising such laws with a view of improving upon the present con- 
dition of things in the matter of Police and Fire Departments, 
street work matters, the Health Board, and the like, all of which 
are now regulated by Legislative patchwork, a little short here, 
and inapplicable there, and altogether superannuated and defect- 
ive. The only trouble is whether or not the Solons at Sacramento 
can produce aught better, and whether or got they are sufficiently 
patriotic not to hand over these various departments to the poli- 
ticians, to be bienially bartered as spoils. At any rate, it would 
seem to behoove the taxpayers in particular to enter early and 
vigorously their protest against any and all legislation which 
would have that effect. 

The facility with which the land-locating swindle is success- 
fully carried out hereabouts, despite the numerous and constant 
disclosures of the stale trick by the newspapers, would almost 
lead one to believe that the power of the press as an educator 
and general "smarter-up" of mankind is overrated. After all 
the most efficient way to make a man realize that he is a fool is 
to part him from his money. Some difficulty has taken place in 
the Jordan property, only last week men were working night 
and day to get the property in shape for sale early in April, but 
now work is suspended; a fence was suddenly built around it 
and armed men left in charge, Through this trouble over two hundred 
men are out of employment. 



. ANNUAL MEETING. 



Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consolidated 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 23, Ne- 
vada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 
Wednesday, the Twenty-eighth (25th) day of January, 1891 , at the hour of 
1:30 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 
Trausfer books will close on Saturday, January 24th, at 12 o'clock m. 

A. H FISH, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 8, No. 327 
Pine street, San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 27th day of January, 1891, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, the 24th day of January, 1891, at 12 
o clock M. 

C. L. PERKINS, Secretary. 
Office— Room S, San Francisco Stock Exchange Building, No. 327 Pine 
street, San Francisco, California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Pajaro Valley Rail Road Company. 
The Regular Aunual meeting of the stockholders ol the Pajaro Valley 
Rail Road Company will be held at the office of the Company, 327 Market 
street, Sau Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 1 9th day of January, 1 891 , at the hour of 1 1 o'clock, A. M., 

for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Thursday January 8th, 1891, at3 o'clock p. m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Crocker Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Crocker Miuing 
Company will be held at the ollice of the company, 26 Nevada Block, No. 
309 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, California, on 

Monday, the nineteenth day of January, 1 891 , at Ihe hour of one o'clock P. M ., 
for the purpose of electiug a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other busiuess as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Friday, January 16, 1891, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

NAT T. MESSER, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada 
Silver Mining Compauy will be held at the office of the company, room 15, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 21st day of January, 1891, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as miy come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturdny, the 17th day of January, 1891, at 
12 o'clock M. 

E. L. PARSER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular annual meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market street, 
Sau Fraucisco, California, ou 

Wednesday, the Twenty-first day of January, 1891 , at the hour of II o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the eusuing 
year, and the transaction of such other busiuess as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 10, at 12 o'clock M. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Home Mutual Insurance Company. 

Conformably to the provisions of Section One of the by-laws of this com- 
pany, the next annual meeting of stockholders will be held at its principal 
office {No. 216 Sansome street, Sau Francisco, California), at 1 o'clock, p. m , 
ou MONDAY, January 19th, a. d 1891, for the election of Directors to serve 
until their successors shall be elected under the provisious of said by-laws. 
The polls will be open from 1 to 4 o'clock. 

CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 

December 10, 1890. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

San Francisco Gas Light Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sau Fraucisco Gas Light 
Company will be held at the office of the company, at 12 o'clock m., ou 
Tuesday, the 20th day of January, 1891. 

WM. G. BaRRETT, Secretary. 
Office of San Francisco Gas Light Compauy, San Francisco, January 5, 
1891. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



BAN KK\\< 



NEWS ! BTTER, 



21 



THE BOURSE AMD NPERWKITKK 

unnarr 17. I J 

THE annual statement Lb*09tDp*nJ pitted. 

Most make a fair show ' do! rum h jul.iln- 

v*r tfa« yetr that hat The leading companies 

have U tatotnenta In pamphlet form 

; method ol letting i • \ how they stand. The 

statement o( the Firemen 'a Pund -hows assetl 
held in cash, real estate, moi onds. After 

tfng it- paid-up capital of ji itatanding demands, 

now being adjusted, ami the re insurance reserve ol $tf06,< 
. it appears to have a net surplus of 1603,081.71. lis In- 
from lire premiums Is stated as |1,158,648.89, and from 
marine. |17S re losses amounted to I 0.83, and 

marine losses to (84,788, the total losses amounting to 
The gross Income for the year ia stated as $1,454,197.00, and the 
gross expenditures as |] No comment on this state- 

ment is necessary. 

• The State Investment reports (ire premiums amounting to $581,- 
194.71, and a gross income of $606 287-35. Its tire losses paid 
amounted to $191,563.54, and BSSS pending to $22,704.33. 

It has a capital stock of $400,000, re-insurance reserve of $224,144.- 
72, and a surplus of $28,728.68. The State investment is doing 
well, and has no cause for complaint. 

The California reports a net surplus over all liabilities of $133,- 
286 15. Its capital stock is $600,000. Its re-insurance reserve 
amounts to $475,860.28. The increase in business over 1889 was 
357.60, and the decrease in expenditure amounted to $76,851.- 
31. The net surplus, as regards policv holders, is announced as 
$783,286.45. 

Manager Du Val, of the Pacific Insurance Union, returned a few 
days ago from a two weeks' trip through the southern portion of 
the State. He reports affairs in a very favorable condition, with 
indications that all the southern towns which have not yet done 
so well, soon do everything they can to protect themselves from 
fire. San Bernardino recently increased its water supply, and 
now it wants a reduction in rates, and its people think it should 
enjoy the same schedule as that given Los Angeles. The latter 
city was assigned book two, while book three was given San Ber- 
nardino. Before the latter town improved its facilities for fight- 
ing fire it was threatened with a heavy increase in rates. As it 
was, the change from book four to book three gave it a reduction 
of about forty per cent. The people of the town want 
a further reduction, however, as they consider that greater recog- 
nition should be taken of their efforts to protect themselves. 

San Bernardino is not the only town that is petitioning for a 
reduction. Our neighbor across the bay is also asicing for lighter 
rates, and the Union has had a surveyor going through the back- 
yards of Oakland with the Fire Warden of that burg for a week, 
past, endeavoring to ascertain if the demand is based on a good 
foundation. Oakland is gradually assuming the importance 
which attaches to it as the sleeping place of the overflow popu- 
lation of the metropolis, and its people intend to assert their 
rights. A reduction on dwelling-bouse rates is very probable. 
While Oakland is forging to the front, Alameda seems to be in a 
very bad way. A recent fire in that pretty suburb showed that 
the fire companies would be absolutely useless under present 
conditions as against a large fire, which is apt to occur in a town 
of wooden dwellings at any time. There is not enough pressure 
on the water, the hydrants are too far apart, and there are not 
enough steam engines. The town is building engine-bouses, but 
it has no engines to put into them. It is only a matter of time, 
however, until the property owners devise some scbeme of bet- 
ter protection, for until they do they will have to pay the piper. 

A. 8. Murray, formerly Manager of the South British in this 
city, has been appointed Manager of the Straits Insurance Co. at 
London. 

Fred. S. Butler, Marine Secretary of the Union, has gone to 
Canton. 

C. P. Fairfield, formerly of the Anglo-Nevada, has gone to 
Yuma in search of improved health. 

The Denver has re-insured with the Western, of Toronto, and 
has withdrawn from the Coast. 

The change in the firm of Farnsworth & Blumberg, referred to 
in this column last month, has taken place. B. D. Farnsworth 
withdraws, taking with him the German, of Pittsburg, the city 
business of which will hereafter be in charge of Warfield & Wat- 
tles, with whom Mr. Farnsworth will have his office. Fred W. 
Blumberg will retain the Pine street offices. 

The general agency of George W. Easton & Co. will remain at 
the Pine street offices, only the city agencies going to the office of 
the Southern California, on California street. 

At the election of the Underwriters' Fire Patrol, on Thursday, 
all the old officers were re-elected, with the exception of George W. 
Spencer instead of Isadore Gutte as President. 

The Visitor, a quarterly publication, designed for the use of 
agents of the California, has been issued. 

Fifty per cent is offered on the Glenfennet, 185 days out from 
Glasgow to this port with a cargo of Scotch flint coal. The Ma- 
laysia has not yet been given up. The German bark Anna which 



on august ;. 1890, from thli port to Liverpool, li vet out 
■i December ?lh last, off the rivet Platte, 
i« thought -he may yel turn up ell right, 8b) . nm« 

has probably gone to tti 

loin. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

• Swvfnfl. B .nk. 

v..r Iho half you ci i baa n di 

altnorateof Mvoand FHiyiwo Ono-huudrcdth 

erm Deposit*, and Fou im hundredth sut per 

annum on iir.luiary licpn.Hi., tree "( ibm-s, payable on and after Prldai 
January 2. l-,l. „ rv _■ 

OtTica No^SM Markcl troet. Flood Building. Ban Prai 

D.VIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernla Savinge and Lomi Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board "f Directorate! this society, hold THIS 
DAY, a dividend has ooen declared at the rate of i\£ per cent per annum 

on all deposits for the six mo ondin i rubor 81, 1890, free from all 

lexer, and payable on aud nfi.-r innuarv 2. I SSI. u. J, TOBIM 

t— Northeast comer Montgomery and Post Streets, 8 P., Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Son Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year eudiDg with 8tst December, 1890, a dividend lias been 
declared at the rate of five aud four tenths (5 4-10) per cent per annum on 
term deposits and four ami one-half ( i' .,) per cent per annum on ordinary 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after FRIDAY, 2d January, 1891. ' 

LOVKLL white, Cashier. 

Office— 532 California street, corner Webb Branch, 17UC Market htreet, 
corner yolk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 18J0, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud fifty-eight hundredths {5 53-100) per cent per annum 
on Term Deposits, and four aud sixty-five hundredths (4 65-110) percent 
per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, aud payable on aud after 
FRIDAY, January 2, 1841. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

Office— Corner of Powell and Eddy streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Soci ty. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1830, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and forty-h'iudredths (5 40-100) per cent per annum on 
term deposits, and four aud one-half (4J^) per ceut per auuum on ordinary 
deposits, payable on and after FRIDAY, January 2, 1891 

GEORGE TO URN Y, Secretary. 

Office— No. 526 California street. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND No. 154. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 
Will pay its regular monthly dividend of one dollar ($1) per share upon Its 
capital stock on January 10, 1891. 

CHARLES R, STORY, Secretary . 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five aud Four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent per auuum on Term De- 
posits, and Four and One-half (4]4) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
p.sits, free of taxes, aud payable on and after Friday, Jannarv 2, 1891. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— No. 619 Clay Street, San Francisco, Cal, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Mutual Savings Bank of San Franeiseo. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Five aud Four-tenths (5 4-10) per ceut per annum on Term De- 
posits, and Four aud One-half (4^) percent per aunum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, January 2, 1891. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— No . 33 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

2,000,000 ACRES ! 

Vast Estates or Acre Lots. All Specialties in Land. 



Stock, Dairy, Grain, Fruit aud General Farms, Resorts, Timber Land 
Mexican Land, Mines, Town Sites and Lots, City Mansions, Country Villas 
and Sites, Investment and Speculative Properties. Money to Loan. 
Send ten cents for 110 page Catalogue. 

€. 11. STREET A CO., Land Agents, 
415 Montgomery Street. 

Good Cheer and a Souvenir of California for our Eastern Friends. 

Ladies and gentlemen desiring to 
send to their friends East the 

TABLE WINES 

OP THE 
INGLENOOK VINEYARD, 
Can have their orders filled at San 
Francisco prices and of freight at 
car-load rates added, thus saving a 
great expense by leaving their or- 
ders in time with 

F. A. HABER, 

Sole Agent of the Inglenook Vineyard, 122 Sansome St., S.F. 




22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



SOME interesting experiments have been made with gyrostats 
in the French navy. One of these has been mounted on the 
Turenne and used for adjusting the compasses of the ship. The 
method adopted depends, of course, on the fact that the plane of 
rotation of a gyrostat is invariable, or rather can only change very 
slowly, if the speed of rotation be high enough; and hence, by 
swinging the ship, the indication of the compass can be compared 
with those of gyrostat, and correcting accordingly. A further 
application of the same principle has al3o been " tested " in the 
French navy. A small gyrostat is fitted to the sextant, and thus 
an invariable line of sight obtained, independent of the motion of 
the ship, when the instrument is set rotating, the principle being, 
of course, the same as in the case of Mr. Beauchamp Tower's 
gun platform. The device is said to have proved very useful in 
making observations in rough weather and at night time. 

— Engineering. 

- -The assumption seems fair that the locomotive engine will 
have been superceded when we double our speeds, and that we 
must find ways to utilize the weights of the cars themselves for 
adhesion, and to make each carry its own motor. This evidently 
points to electric traction, the only method as yet discovered of 
keeping the horse in the stable, and yet of making him do his 
work without taxing us for his own carriage. I have very little 
question that, where railways are carrying large numbers of 
passengers on short routes, as on our elevated systems of road — 
where, if ever, we may reach enormously high speeds — the elec- 
tric motor, or some advance even on that latest marvel of engi- 
neering, must come into use. Heat, light and electricity will 
then conspire in that coming revolution which shall combine for 
us the speed of the birds, the comforts of home, and the safety of 
the hermit's cell. And what must come will come. 

— Prof. R. If. Thurston, in The Forum. 

At a recent meeting of the French Academy of Medicine, 

a paper on the subject of the repeal of the restrictive measures 
against American salt meats, prepared by Dr. Pietra-Santa, was 
presented and read. The author made a complete study of every- 
thing that has been written or said since 187G on the subject of 
trichina and trichinosis, and recalled that the Academy itself had 
sustained the following opinions: That the fear caused by trich- 
ina is exaggerated; that the American meats constitute a valu- 
able resource for the alimentation of the poor classes, of the army, 
and of the navy, being wholesome, cheap and highly appreciated; 
that the French, in their culinary habits, do not use raw salt 
pork, and only employ it after it has been thoroughly cooked, 
that is to say, rendered inoffensive. For these reasons, he held 
the prohibitory measures ought to be abolished. 

The United States is fast becomingaland of precious stones. 

LHamonds have been found in Georgia. Pearls are now being 
picked up in Wisconsin, and Uncle Sam is making arrangements 
for an invoice of some of them for his collection, says the Pitts- 
burg IHspfttck. There are some beautiful turquoises in the cases 
which were brought by Major Powell from New Mexico, and 
these are quite as tine as the blue turquoises which the Govern- 
ment has from Persia. Of less expensive stones the beryls are 
very beautiful, and there is a piece of aquamarine from Portland, 
Me., which is as big as your fist, and which shines like a diamond. 

— Jewelers' Circular. 

Speaking of smokers and smoking — and this is a time when 

wives who have husbands who smoke are anxious to learn facts 
about cigars — the Chicago Journal remarks: "A few experts may 
find value and solace in a tinfoil covered 25-cent weed, but 
when anything over a quarter is paid it is money thrown away 
for ornaments like tinfoil band, fancy lining to box, etc. At 
present prices of tobacco and labor, a manufacturer can't put a 
value of 50 cents in one cigar, unless he folds in 25 cents worth 
of postage stamps." 

Up and away the best thing for washing the hair is hard soap, 

procured from the kitchen. Make a strong suds, rub it quickly 
on the hair, and just as quickly wash it otf again. This removes 
'superfluous oil and leaves the hair in good condition for a gen- 
eral rubbing and shampooing with warm water and perfumed 
toilet soap. Soap suds, thickened with' glycerine and the white 
of an egg, are responsible for the lovely, satiny gloss to be seen in 
the back coils of so many of our pretty society lassies. 

Sometimes it is convenient to have a light burn all night, 

especially in a room where one may be ill, but a lamp designed 
for the purpose is not always accessible. A candle, however, can 
always be had, and a simple but effectual night-light can be made 
of it. Fill a tumbler with water, and in it place a piece of par- 
atfine candle in the lower end of which a nail has been stuck 
to act as a weight and keep it upright. 

The Medical and Surgical Reporter h&a set about obtaining the 

views of medical men on cremation, and from interviews thus far 
published, the profession cannot be said to be unanimous, but 
there seems to be a strong preponderance in favor of cremation. 



T?:r5rsTJE.-A_i>rcE!. 



Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibit 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

276 Sansome Street, S. F. 
INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n. $3,033,420.31 I Reinsurance Reserve $ 251,182.68 

Assets January 1, 1890 - . 821.517.09 Capital paid up, Gold . . - 300,000.00 
Surplus for policy holders 810,567.09 | Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 244,884.41 

Income in 1889 J389.971.75 | Fire Losses paid in 1889. »192,375.28 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1890 10,359.00 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. . ..J. L. N. SHEPARD I General Agent R. H. MAGILL 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

-F-CiaiE A-IETX) ZkEA-IRJIEriE. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full. I 200.000.00 

ASSETS, December 31. 1889. 406,003.99 

LOSSES Paid in 18 Years (Since Organization) 2,463,080.77 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 

Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBUR6. 

Capital *7, 500,000.00 

Net surplus 389,266. 10 

Assets January 1, 1890 1,511,557.70 

Invested in U. S 517,406.73 

GEO. MARCUS & CO.. 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

SmW General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed tl 0,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve rund (in addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6.124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 19,260.000 

Cash Assets 2.764.876 

Cash Assets In United States 1.398,646 

WM. ZMZA-CZDOZNTA-IiID. 

GENERAL AGENT, 

315 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. B ALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. 
TheBe three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
Btreet, San Francisco. 

THE PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1868. 
LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE. 

Principal Office, 418 California Street, San Francisco- 

Assets, January 1st, 1890 $2,150,000.00 

Surplus 314,000.00 

Paid Policyholders In twenty years. 4,400,000.00 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco- 

COKE— CHEAPEST FUEL! 

Reduction in Price. 

Wholesale (50 bbls. or more), 80c per bbl. Retail (any quantity 

under co bbls.), 90c. per bbl. 

AT THE WORKS OF 

THE SAN FRANCISCO GASLIGHT COMPANY, 
HOWARD AND FIRST STS., and FOOT OF SECOND STREET. 




M'W -11: 



Two matdena loaded down with £<>.«. 
Budond ili« same isdt youth. 
(Uke nil It met! ba.«e pelf. 

And l'»Tol but ;" l . .m.l truth). 
On,- t«»M htm *! thv "ibex 

Aaanmad to be • >-h bereft. 
Now which of tin- fair pair w*5 right 

And which ol Mum waa left? 

■* Reformation, deab breddern. doan consist in gittra 1 up in 

chn'ch on Bundaj raawoin' and yellirV " Praise de I- twd '* and den 
tn'mn man' «n*i gota' chicken stealin' onSanday night. In conjunx- 
ment wid dis 1 wish ter state ii:it :\ full breed banty rooster wua ex- 
tracted from my coop las' Sunda; ebenln', an 1 ct he ain't sent back 
deleadin' reform ationisl ir Qockll git into trouble 

shuah." —Rev. Wink Plunk. 

CaIUr(to minister's liUle girl)— You say that your father is not 

In. He Is back from his summer vacation. 1 suppose? Little Girl- 
Oh, yes; bul 1 beard him tell mamma that he was going up in the 
i practice on his congh, for if be didn't he would not pet his 
winter vacation. — New York Sun. 

Mamma {from the nest room, hearing a suspiciously sibilant noise, 
followed by aaoraoa*) — What was that. Agnes? Mr. Sissy {who lisps, 
but i.« mud to the (KOoriofl )— That wath a mouth ; it startled Mith Ag- 
nelli. Mamma (who has Men young herself) — Yes, I thought it was! 
Don't do it again, please. —Life. 

— —My dear child," said an unhappy father, " are you aware that 
you have rushed into an engagement with a young man who has not 
even paid a tailor's bill for four years '.' " " But lie dresses well, papa. 
And alter we are married I suppose lie can buy groceries on the same 
plan." 

Old Mother Hubbard, she went to the cupboard, 

To get the poor dog some bread, 
But she took by mistake some her daughter did hake, 

And shortly the dog was dead. 
Father — Now listen to me, children; I want you from now on 
tube as bad as you know how. Tommy — Won't you whip us, pa?. 
Father— Not if you are very bad, but I'll whip you if you behave your- 
selves. Your aunt is coming to visit us, and I don't want her to stay 
long. — Texas Sif tings. 

•Justice — Madame, you are charged with having assaulted your 
servant girl. On the morning of the 2Sth of this month you threw a 
cup of water in her face, kicked her, and finally you threw a dish full 
of butter at her head. Mrs. Testy — Yes, but it was the rancid butter, 
not the fresh. 

" I tell you. said Mr. Goslo. " this campaign reading that they 

send around has a wonderful effect. It fills nie with kindling en- 
thusiasm. 1 ' " Well," replied his wife, " kindling enthusiasm is what 
you need more than anything else. There ain't a stick of wood split." 

— Washington Post. 

There is one ward in New York, anyhow, which Tammany did 

not carry in the late election." remarked Frank Duffy to Col. Kerri- 
gan. " Which ? " asked the Colonel. " Ward McAllister." Then fol- 
lowed drinks for two. 

Oharminq Vocalist — I wish to get a copy of " The Consecrated 
Cross I'd Bear." Ms. Jf—rst — Er— " Consecrated Cross-eyed Bear" — 
comic song, I presume? But I'm afraid we haven't got it. Sold the 
last copy yesterday. 

Miss Nevcash—0 ma, I saw such a beautiful bust of Washing- 
ton to-day. Mrs. Newcash — My dear child, how many times will I 
have to tell you that it is very vulgar to say " bust? " You should 
say "burst." — Munsey's Weekly. 

This world is a crowded 'bus, 

A few good men, perhaps, 
May find a seat, but most of us 
"Must hang on by the straps. 

— Chicago Journal. 

Servant {answering bell) — My master isn't in, sir; you may leave 

the bill if you wish. Caller (in surprise)— Bill? I have no bill — wish 
to — Servant {in surprise also)— No bill? Then you must have called 
at the wrong house. — Paris Gaulois. 

——Visitor— Isn't your mother afraid, Willie, of catching cold in 
those slippers. Willie— Huh, I guess you don't know them slippers ! 
Ma uses them to warm the whole family with." 

— When a woman goes to invest in sealskins she soon realizes that 
fifty dollars will not go fur. 

Some people had rather hug a delusion than a pretty girl. Editors 

are not built that way. 

Man may live without books; what is knowledge but grieving? 
He may live without hope— what is hope but deceiving? He may 
live without love— what is passion but pining? But where is the man 
that can live without dining? and where can a better place for dining 
be found than the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street? 

A wheelwright need not always be tired, but a wheel must always 
be tired to wheel right, and when a man is tired it is only necessary 
for him to wheel right into the Grand Central Wine Rooms, 16-18 
Third street, when the feeling of lassitude will soon be dispelled 
under the good effect of the finest of drinks sold there. 

Smoking Jackets at G. T. Marsh & Co.'s, under Palace Hotel. 



F1REM# FUblQ 



CAPITAL 



Insuranoe Company. 
ii coo.000. i assets 



I). J. STAI'I.KS 
WILLIAM J. D 

B. FAYMONVILLE 
(fF.ORG,- II TYSON 
). B. LF.VI.SON 



•2.550.000. 

Fr. 

vi<h' President 

secretary. 

At.;*'!, Secretary. 

Marine Becreur*. 

igrati in n',1 prominent localities throughout the Patted 8tato«. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
FIKE -A.ISTU IMI-A-IRIICT-E. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANS0ME STRCE1, 

San Frnnctaco, California. 
GEORGE L. BRANDER, CHAS. H. CUSH1NG, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Dirk orb— D. Callaghau, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. <l ddstelu, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. F. Buckley, Dr. . m. Jones, G. H. Wheatou, T. McMullin, H. H. Watson. 

H. Dimoud, P. Bolo 



AGGHE6ATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London \ Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool (Established 1867.] 
Connecticut Fre Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

N. W. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 



The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London, 

CAPITAL AND ASSETS (4,694,988 00 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

ASSETS 10,581,953 00 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford. 

ASSETS 2,443,937 33 

GEO. D. DORNIN, Manager. WM. SEXTON, Assistant Manager. 

214 Sansome Street. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSORANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. S . . $746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $30,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $1G,407,072.46 

420 California Street. San Francisco, Cat. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

THE LANCASHIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
GEORGE STEWART, - - - General Manager. 

Guaranteed Capital $15,000,000 OO 

Assets 7,852,368 69 

All iuformation in regard to the Company may be obtained from 
MANN & WILSON, 
General Agents for Hie Pacific Coast, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL , $5,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
Mo. 316 CalHomla street. San Francisco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,538.46. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




318 G r,L i FoBN '^ S J - 



n ^Company? >• 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



THE WEIR.-S.. Louis Globe. 

The willows sway and quiver, 
But never a suund I hear, 

Save the laugh of the rushing river. 
The roar of the boiling weir! 

The meadows are silently sleeping 
In sunlight calm and clear — 

O, the joy of the water leaping. 

O, the song of the tumbling weir! 

I forget my rod and my casting, , 

I forget the far, the near, 
And I dream of peace everlasting 

By tbe side of the brawling weir. 



THE "CALL" ON THE ROYAL BALL. 

PROVIDENCE never does imperfect work. When it created 
California it saw tbat there was something lacking, and it 
promptly supplied the deficiency by creating the Call, If it were 
not for the Call half the glories of California would go unsung. 
We should never have known, fur instance, if Mr. Pickering had 
not told us, what a remarkable social event we had witnessed in 
the inaugural ball at Sacramento. It appears to have been fully 
worthy of ranking with the historical reception to Lieutenant- 
Governor Reddick, at Mokelumne Hill, which tbe Post described 
as resembling tbe visit of Cleopatra to Antony. According to the 
society expert of the Call, " all tbe magnificence and stalely pride 
of a court fete were blended in the inaugural ball." It is not a 
police court fete that is referred to, as might be imagined, from 
the fact that the guests included Sam Rainey, Marcus D. Boruck, 
and the bulk of the San Francisco delegation in the Legislature. 
The context shows that the royal courts of the effete monarchies 
of Europe are the things to which the dance at Sacramento held 
a family relation. "Judging alone by exterior pomp and circum- 
stance," Mr. Pickering exultingly informs us, "the occasion 
might well have been some great coronation festivities at Buck- 
ingham Palace, the Tuilleries, Unter den Linden, the White Palace 
on the Neva, or any other recognized crowning place of the an- 
cient monarchies of Europe. But while the necessary dignity of 
form was presented, there was a conspicuous lack of that buck- 
ram frigidity and devotion to starch which render participation 
in any European official function a penance and weariness to the 
spirit." Tbe blaise social historian of the Call, returning wearily 
from a round of frigid gaieties in the palaces of the Old World, 
found congenial relaxation in the unstarched festivities of 
Sacramento, where ladies, who encountered a lack of champagne, 
graciously accepted whisky as an entirely satisfactory substitute. 
"Therefore," he remarks, "the white and gold invitations had 
gone abroad and had met with a more than usually eager sale." 
There can be no doubt that, in this respect at least, the inaugural 
ball laid over any court function in modern European history. 
The Queen of England herself, on her gilded throne in the House 
of Lords, never sold half as many invitations to her resplendent 
drawing rooms as were sold by the managers of the Markham 
dance at Sacramento. The Czar of Russia has had some brilliant 
entertainments in the Winter Palace, but he never had success as 
a ticket peddler to compare with that of the inaugural invitation 
committee. Few of the palaces of Europe ever witnessed such 
gorgeousness of decoration as made the Sacramento ball, in the 
language of our chronicler, " a landmark in the State's social tra- 
ditions." It takes half a column to give even a faint conception 
of the marvels wrought by the gifted beings felicitously described 
as the <« magi of the decorative art." There were mirrors, hand 
stands, canvas, evergreens — red, white and blue bunting — over 
four hundred gas jets and a thousand glaring electric lights. 
Moreover, there were Latin mottoes: " Pio aHs el focis,'* •'Vincit 
amor patriae," "JE pluribus itnum," "Labor omnia vincit " — every- 
thing, in fact, that profound research and unwearied industry 
could extract from the back of the dictionary. It must not be 
supposed tbat all this grandeur was attained without expense. 
The decorations cost no less than $f!37. What do the abashed 
sovereigns of Europe think of that? In fa>;t, the feature of the 
ball that most impressed Mr. Pickering's susceptible envoys, was 
Its overpowering display of wealth. The $637 worth of decora- 
tions were only the beginning. The guests fully lived up to them. 
In the costumes there was a leading tendency, we are informed, 
"toward jewel embroidered net, in price all the way from $10 to 
$50 a yard." One lady " wore a magnificent $1,000 black 
Valenciennes lace dress, made high neck, and elegant diamonds." 
Even if she obtained her gown at a discount, the price she paid 
for it would undoubtedly cause a sensation if announced in any 
Court Circular in Europe. Unfortunately the Call' 3 list of cos- 
tumes is not complete as to cost, and we are compelled to guess 
at the value of most of the dresses described. It is certain, how- 
ever, that the King of Spain himself never attended a ball whose 
features, from dresses to decorations, from floor committees to re- 
freshments, were more consistently and sumptuously regal. 



Japanese Silk Dressing Gowns at Marsh's, under Palace Hotel. 




— Copyright, 1889. 

Her grace of motion, and of look, the smooth 
The swimming majesty of step and tread, 
The Symmetry of form and feature, set 
The snul afloat, even like delicious airs 
Of flute and harp." 

For her matchless look of grace and motion, 
this regal beauty was indebted to perfect 
health, restored by the use of that unequaled, 
invigorating tonic and nervine. Dr. Pierce's 
Favorite Prescription, which set in healthy 
action every function and gave purity and 
richness to the blood. 

*' Favorite Prescription " is a positive cure 
for the most complicated and obstinate cases 
of leucorrhea, excessive flowing, painful men- 
struation, unnatural suppressions, prolapsus, 
or falling of the womb, weak hack, "female 
weakness," anteversion, retroversion, bear- 
ing-down sensations, chronic congestion, in- 
flammation and ulceration of the womb. It 
is guaranteed to give satisfaction in every 
case, or monev refunded. 

Manufactured by World's Dispensary 
Medical Association, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Or, PIERCE'S PELLETS 

regulate nnd cleanse the liver, Btomach and 
bowels. They are purely vegetable and per- 
fectly harmless. One 'a Dose. Sold by 
druggists. 25 cents a vial. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— 3au Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the sixteenth day of December, 1S90, an assessment (No. 35) of Fifty (50) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twentieth day of January, 1891. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the teuth day of February. 1.891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLTOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 98 

Amount per Share 30 Cents 

Levied January 2, 1891 

Delinquent in Office. February 5, 1891 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock February 24, 1891 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest Urade Champagne in the World. 

. "CAETE BLAITGIIB." 

V {77^* XZj^Kr (WHITE LABEL) 

V^JfiS^. "a-BAN"D VIZEsT SEC," 

(BROWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 
See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 
Sole Aqents for the Pacific Coast. 




Jan. 17, 1891. 



BAN Kl; w- VVS 1 ETTKR. 






THE HYPOCRITE AND THE CAT 

WHKN Blabe bad* Seaman, the leper, go wash in Jordan 
seven ttoice end be elcen. prophet though he \v»«, bfl dM 
n->t fafeaec that nearly three thousand yeers later mankind 
would be cursed with a different form of leprosy from Ihni wblofa 
afflicted (be captain of the host ■•( tbe King of Wyria. Nor did lie 
recoffniie. when he detected Ueba the aronld-be grabber of 
olivryard* and vineyards, the Her and hypocrite)— and transferred 
to bim. as a proper punishment for hi* obliquity, the loath soma 
disease of which he had cleansed Naaman, that his hypocritical 
servant would be the prototype of a class of leprous men that in- 
fest all grades of MOtety in the present age. 

There is a physical leprosy and a psychical leprosy — a leprosy 
of the body and a leprosy of the soul. The former is easily de- 
tected, carrying about with it outward and visible signs of cor- 
poreal rottenness: the latter is hidden by a cloak of pretentious 
honesty and morality, anil wears a mask of fictitious purity and 
cleanliness. Inside tbe cloak, and disguised by the mask, dwells 
the hypocrite. 

When Wesley proclaimed from the pulpit that cleanliness was 
a paving-stone to godliness, be supplied tbe hypocrite with a 
bint that he did not fail to seize upon and put in practice. Your 
sleek and pinus hypocrite, with words of charity and brotherly 
love ever at the tip of hia tongue, is tbe very model of personal 
purity — a chaste spectacle of immaculateness in his dress and der- 
matous covering. He always keeps his cloak and mask scrupu- 
lously clean and neat. He is constantly washing his hands and 
face, as though in fear that his countenance might betray the 
stains on his spiritual features, and that his fingers might expose 
lo sight the dirt and slime that befouls his soul. 

Now, there are only two classes of animals that wash the face — 
mankind and the feline race, and of all creatures in the animal 
kingdom the most significant type of the hypocrite is the cat. In 
its sleek appearance and cleanly habits, by its velvety foot-fall, 
with its purring and fawning, its insidious treachery and expert- 
ness in capturing its prey, it presents a perfect portrait of our 
modern Pecksniff. 

I have often wondored how a high-caste hypocrite bears him- 
self in the presence of the " grim King of Terrors," and it was 
only a few days ago that Dr. Haightfrord enlightened me on 
the subject. 

"During his last illness," said the doctor, " I attended in my 
professional capacity, Mr. Robemall. You know what a wealthy 
fraud he was. Anaesthetics, so far as physical suffering was con- 
cerned, were unnecessary, as he was the victim of a painless dis- 
ease, but one which precluded hope of recovery, and was rapid 
in its action. All that could be done for him was to administer a 
sedative from time to time, to keep the nervous system at rest. 

"On the occasion of my last visit to him, well knowing that 
* life's gloomy foe ' already had him in his clutch, I found him ex- 
tended on his bed, his countenance flashing with that life-like 
vivacious expression, which the human face not unfrequently 
assumes just before immediate death, when conscience and 
thought are still clear for a few moments before the final collapse. 

"The end was drawing very near. Suddenly an expression of 
repugnance and alarm was spread over his countenance. ( Doctor,' 
he. exclaimed, ' seated on my breast is a black cat, washing his 
face; behind him and on each side of him there are the faces of 
defrauded widows and orphans, of despairing, toiling men and 
cheated workers; and they are glaring at him with phosphores- 
cent, lamp-like eyes out of the darkness! ' 

" Raising himself, with a supreme effort, he gasped out with 
his last breath, ' and, oh Godl that cat's face is my own! ' Then 
he sank back, dead, every feature stamped with terror." 

OBITUARY. 

WE are pained to have to record the death of M alp as Alfred 
Marsh, second son of George T. Marsh, at the early age of 
seven years and eight months. He was, apparently, in perfect 
health on Sunday, but in the evening was seized with a convul- 
sion, and died before medical aid could be procured. It is sur- 
mised that the convulsion might have arisen from one of his 
schoolmates having lifted him up by the neck during the week, 
which caused a swelling of the glands, but, with the exception of 
his complaining of some pain, he appeared perfectly well. A 
number of his playmates were present at the funeral at the parent's 
residence, and one little fellow was observed to follow on foot the 
carriage containing the body of his playmate as far as the ceme- 
tery. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the parents in their 
great affliction. 

MRS. J. H. NEVINS, widow of Thomas J. Nevins, and one of 
the best known teachers of this city, died at her residence, 
1327 Sacramento street, on Monday, in her 84th year. She com- 
menced her career as a teacher in the East as early as 1828. Mrs. 
Nevins held a position in the public schools of this city for twenty- 
two years. Although she had reached such an advanced age, ber 
mental faculties remained unimpaired up to the time of her death. 

CHAS H. BREWER, a brother of the Rev. Alfred Lee Brewer, 
Principal of the collegiate school, St. Matthews Hall, San Ma- 
teo, died very suddenly in this city last Saturday night. 



POTHEEN. 

('nine fill me a noggin of ould potheen. 

That the eye ol « ftauyar ha* never lean, 

9o that my darl 

May pit ; in ihli oold potheen, 

for this frisky, whisky, called potheen, 
Will make your eyes, love, In rapture gleam. 

Your lips, love, were made tor this drink divine, 

'Tis more precious than LachrymachrletJ wine; 

Boon, soon, my love, 'twill make yon scream, 

Then pledge me again in good, strong potheen, 
The courtl strong potheen, 

The rollicking, f rollicking, Btrong potheen. 

We'll bug, and kiss, till the daylight's sheen 

Will beam on the face ol my own colleen, 

And ever anon a* we pass the jug, 

I'll steal a kiss, and you'll give a hug, 

For the fumes of the sparkling, ould potheen, 
Will open the heart of my own colleen. 

Editor fffewi Letter; In your issue of the 27th. P. M. King, who 
has written some verse occasionally for your paper, contributed a 
Bacchanalian song in praise of wine. Is it a coincidence or an 
imitation of the above verses in praise of potheen? Old time resi- 
dents of the Province of ^onnaught are familiar with the above 
strain in praise of their favorite liquor. Icon will confer a great 
favor if yon republish it for their benefit, and ohlige 

Edmohd Lovek, 8C5 Market street. 



DANGERS OF THE STREET. 

THE dangers of the street have hitherto been deemed such as 
arose from runaway teams, cable cars, falling sign-boards, and 
the like. The greater danger is now from murderous highway- 
men in quest of prey. It seems that no citizen who ventures out 
after nightfall is proof against the attacks of the robber, who turns 
assassin upon the mere chance of gaining a little pocket money. 
Jacobson was murdered at his own door-steps, and his assailants 
had only to walk leisurely away, ns if nothing had happened, in 
order to escape the attention of passers-by and the subsequent 
vigilance of tbe police. It may even be that we may be mur- 
dered without our statement of the fact beingso much as believed. 
We now know that Jacobson was killed because be resisted being 
robbed. The authorities being unable to give any account of the 
thieves, industriously worked up numerous woman stories, and 
sent the young man to bis grave with a dishonored memory, to the 
great grief of his sorely afflicted family, and to the scandal of the 
whole community. There never ought to have been any doubt 
about Jacobson's few but last words. The man who could, on 
the instant, whilst in great pain and in the presence of death, tell 
his mother a concocted yarn of that kind, has yet to be born. 
Had it not been for the happy chance by which the truth leaked 
out, Jacobson's memory never would have been cleared, nor 
would his murderers have been brought to justice. And now one 
of Waterman's pardoned pets has been caught in a dark door- 
way with a slung-shot, ready to brain the first passer-by. Let us 
double the force of police if that will suffice, which we doubt. 
Better still, let ns illumine the whole city, regardless of expense. 
Anything to make San Francisco a safe city to live in. 



GOT INTO THE COURTS. 



IT appears that one phase of the BehringSea dispute has reached 
the United States Supreme Court. Two years ago the revenue 
steamer Bear seized a Canadian sealing vessel, and took ber to 
Alaska, where, by order of the United States District Court, she 
was condemned and sold. Her owner, tired, no doubt, by tbe 
slowness of diplomatic proceedings, has appealed from the de- 
cision of the Alaskan tribunal to tbe Court of last resort at 
Washington. His right to do so is not a matter susceptible of 
doubt or dispute. But it seems that he asked for and obtained 
the assistance of the Canadian Government and the approval of 
the British Cabinet in presenting his case. Why this should be 
deemed by our Secretary of State an affront, only to be wiped out 
by a humble apology, does not appear. Under similar circum- 
stances, our Ministers to foreign countries have frequently been 
instructed to lend their assistance to the prosecution of the 
claims of American citizens. One very conspicuous instance that 
we remember, was that of the notorious Landeau claim. Secre- 
tary Blaine himself issued the instructions, and no less a person 
than Vice President Morton, then Minister to France, was re- 
quired to aid in giving them effect. Why an appeal from an in- 
ferior to a superior Court of our own country should be objected 
to by our own Government, is not apparent from the statement 
of the situation contained in the press dispatches. However that 
may be, there is now nothing in the issue appealed. Secretary 
Blaine does not now contend for his early claim of exclusive 
ownership of Behring's Sea, and, with the abandonment of that 
position, compensation for seized vessels necessarily follows. Co- 
operation in protecting the fur-bearing animals will be next in 
order. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



i.LOYD TEViS, President. San Francisco. 
IMO. J. VALENTINE. Vice- PRESIDENT 

AND CEN. liAHAGBB, SaN FRANCISCO. 
JAMES HERON. SECRETARY. Sa.V FRANCISCO. 

H. B. PARS0N3. ASST. SECY, New York. 

H. WADSWORTE, Treasurer. San Francisco, 

office of the 
Vice-Pres't and Genx Manager. 






San eFtcw-i-cioco, 'iPccciii&er: 31, 1S90. 

Dear Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia) during 1S90, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, $3-, 156,916; Silver, $62,930,831; 
Copper, $ 20,569, 092; Lead, $11,509,571. Total gross result, #127, 166,410. The " commercial " value at which the several metals 
named herein have been estimated is : Silver, £1.04 per oz.; Copper, 14 cts. per lb.; and Lead, $4.30 per cwt. 

As in former reports, allowance must be made for probable variations from exact figures, by reason of constantly 
increasing facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the Express, and the difficulty 
of getting entirely reliable data from private sources. Especially is such the case in t'.ie reports from Montana and Colorado. 
Statistics gathered in this way are liable to be exaggerated; but, with some modincatious 011 this account, made herein, the 
final general results reached, while only approximately correct, may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under 
the circumstances. No bullion or coin received by Wells, Fargo & Co's Express from the west coast of Mexico during 1S90. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Gold Pust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 


Gold Dust and 

Bullion l>y "other 

Conveyances. 


Silver Bullion 
by Express. 


Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight. 


TOTAL. 




^,605,958 

2,6a3,SS4 
915,000 
164,000 


|l,2QO,893 


$ 670,184 

4,738,020 

71,000 

85,000 


|.I,I94,079 
1,808,632 


$II,76l,II4 
9,240,536 






50,000 

30,000 

762,811 






279,000 
762,SlI 




■4,635,000 
15,129,207 
10,004,306 

4,I52,CS4 
4,165,161 
5,763,29S 




3.595,333 
2,764,116 
88,79s 
4,210,961 
276,034 
1,050, 4 S6 
0,045.560 

361,555 


5,594,167 
16,921,632 
2,166,071 

iS,9ii,So2 
117,790 
6S 3 ,565 


13,824,500 

34,814.955 
12,259,175 

27.275,447 

4.65S.9S5 
7,597,349 
3,045,560 

249,423 
361,555 






Utah 










100,000 
100,000 






249,423 
















Total 


I27.771.6S5 


S 2,333, 704 


$50,208,654 


I46.S52.367 


$127, 166,410 





The gross yield for 1S90, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 2 5l % $32,156,916 

Silver 49f , u B rf 62,930,831 

Copper 161V1T 20,569,092 

Lead 9 T § ¥ n,5°9,57i 



Total 1127,166,410 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1S70-1890 



YEAR. 


Production as 
per W. F. & Co's State- 
ments, including 
amounts from British 
Columbia aud West 
Coast of Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Products of the States and Territories West of the Missouri River, exclusive 
of British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, is as follows : 




Lead. 


COPPER. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


187O 


$ 54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
So,SS9,057 
9 .875,I73 
9S,42i,754 
81,154,622 

75,349,501 
80,167,936 
84,504,417 
92,411,835 
90,313,612 

84,975,954 

90,181,260 

103,011,761 

104,645,959 

"4,341,592 
127,677,836 
127,166,410 


$ 52,150,000 

55,7S4,ooo 

60,351,824 
70,139, S60 
71,965,610 

76,703,433 
87,219,859 

95,Sn,582 
78,276,167 
72,688,888 
77,232,512 
Si,i9S,474 

89,207,549 
84,639,212 

Si,633,835 
S7.311.382 
100,160,222 
103,327,770 
112,665,569 
126.723.3S4 
126.S34.855 


$ i.oSo.ooo 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,Soo,ooo 
5, 100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 
5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
S, 163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 
9,185,192 

9.631,073 
11,263,630 

14,593,323 
",509,571 




jS17.320.ooo 
I9,2S6,ooo 
19,924,429 
27.4S3.302 
29,699,122 

31,635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37,032,S57 
38,033,055 
42.9S7.613 
4S, 133,039 
42,975,101 

43,529,925 
44,516,599 
52,136,851 
5 o,S33,S84 
53,152,747 
64,SoS,637 
62,930,831 


$33,750,000 
34,39S,ooo 

3S, 177,395 
39,206,55s 
3S,466,48S 
39,96s, 194 
42,886,935 
44.SS0.223 
37,576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,067 
30,653,959 
29,011,318 
27,816,640 
25,iS3,567 
26,393,756 
29,561,424 
32,500,067 
29.987,702 
32,527,661 
31,795,361 


I87I 




I872 




1873 




I874 




1875 




I876 




I877 




IS78 




IS79 




1SS0 


$ 898,000 
I,I95,000 

4,055,037 
5,683,921 

6,086,252 
7,838.036 

9,276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 
14,793,763 
20,569,092 


i88r 


1SS2 


18S3 


1SS4 


1SS5 


iSS6 


1SS7 


iSSS 


1SS9 


1890 





The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows ; From London, 
$41,173,444; from San Francisco, $6,800,865. Total, $47,974,309, as against $57,654,712 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated 
at $4.84. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



BAN KK WCISi NEWS I I Till;. 



97 



(S li u i/fob Sfca I'c 3 f 3 1 I G x i c o . 

RTATEMl'-VT OF TIIK FHODVCT ■ SIIVIR IN rill HI Trill IC 0» Ml NIC... > 1 I D \MI CORK I M 1S77TO 180O. 

VALUES DFON MINTAGE BASIS. 



M \KS 



187.V : 
1S79- • 
1SS0-1SM 

1882-1883 

1883 

1884 

1S85-1SS6.. 
IS86-IS-: 

1887-1888.. 

IS8S-ISS9.. 
ISS9-1890.. 

Total 






t :■ 
881,000 
943,000 

1,013,000 

937.000 

956,000 

1,055,000 

914,000 

1,026,000 

1,047,000 

1,031,000 

1,040,000 

1,100,000 



$12,689,000 



SM VI H. 



((14,837,000 
15, 1 25.000 

29.234.000 
29,329.000 
29.569,000 
31,695,000 
33, 226,000 
34.1 12,000 
34,600,000 
34,912,000 
40,706,000 
41,500,000 



$415,645,000 



$25,584,000 
26,006,000 
27,742,000 
17,000 
30,266,000 
30,525,000 
32,750,000 
34.140,000 
35,138,000 
35,647,000 
35,943,ooo 
41,746,000 
42,600,000 



$428,334,000 



KXHIB1T OP COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE 1ST OF JULY, 1873, 

TO THE 30TH OF JUNE, 1S9O. 



YEARS. 


Gold Dollars. 


Silver Dollars. 


Copper Dollars. 


1873-1S74 


$S66,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 
452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340.320 
305,100 
243,29s 


$18,846,067 
I9.3S6,95S 
19.454,054 
21,415.128 
22,0S4,2O3 

22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,617,395 
25,146,260 

24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,S5o,ooo 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 


$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
41,364 
16,300 
14,035 
42,258 
11,972 




1S75-1S76 


1S76-1S77 

1S77 1878 

1S7S-1879 


1S79-1SS0 


1SS0-1SS1 


18S1 1S82 


1S82 1883 


1SS3-18S4 




1SS4 1S85 




18S5 1886 




1886-1SS7 




1887 188S 




1888-18S9 




1S89-1890 








Total 


$8,934,467 


$400,197,434 


$203,296 





Summary'. — Totals: Gold, $8,934,467; Silver, $400,197,434; Copper, $203,296; Grand Total, $409,335,197. 



EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537, TO THE END OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1890. 



Colonial, Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


TOTAL. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929.29S,329 


342,893 




Independence. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 


Republic Eagle— 1S24 to 30th June, 1873 


$ 557,392 
45,040,628 


$ lS,575.569 
740,246,485 


$5,235,177 


$ 19.132,961 
790,522,290 


Republic. 


145,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1S73, to 30th of 


$8,934,467 


$400,197,434 


$203,296 


$409,335,197 







SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence— from 1S22 to 1873, $809,655,251 ; Republic— from 
1873 to 1S90, $409,335,197. Total, $3,370,572,408. ,...-, ,„ f 

Tbe returns from Mexico continue to sbow a steady forward movement, in full accord with the healthy progress ot 
mineral developments and mining interests in the United States. This result is owing, in great measure, to tbe liberal and 
friendly policy of the Federal Government of Mexico, which has afforded enterprises of the kind every reasonable encour- 
agement. The prospects for the future are also very bright. 




4!&C^0v6c*ccJ 



Vice-President and General Manager. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 




A DISCONNECTED TRIALOGUB. 

W, Or™**-" I **» .«;« «» .!«• *»■ • «'■ * >'" '**"' '"' """ 

shaft 1 * lieAimg l>y ^ * m * iL s \ r - n . ., ThlB ., w hat 1 call solid comfortl" 



USED TO IT. J*' 

LADY (ft» applicant for footman's plate) — 

"Your appearance is rather against you. Are 

you used to waiting?" 

Applicant— 1 " Waiting! Begorra, I think 

so. I've been waiting four hours to see yer, 

roa'ara, and I haven*! set eyes on yci till this' 

blessed minute," 



Slit; Please hake he up a dose of castor oil. 

Smart Clerk (after a lapse o/ five minutes) : Have a. class of 

SODA, WON'T 

She drinks soda and watts far the oil 
jSman Citrk . Anything else, Miss? 

■flie : TnE castor oil, please, 
Stiart Clerk: Why, I oave you the oil in the soda I 
She Well, I didn't want it for myself It was fob 



CREAM SKIMMED FROM THE HUMOROUS ILLUSTRATED PRESS. 



Jan 17, 1801. 



s\\ FRANCIS 



NEWS LETTER. 



29 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE 00N>HUE 8R0«D-0»UGE tOUTE." 

COMMX] ... im 

ud uulll farther notice, boat* an.l T- 

le*Te from and arrive at the Sjuj Fraiu-^ro Paa- 

tenttt Depot, MARKET Sl'RKKT Wit kKF. aa 

follow* 

Froa San Francisco for Point Tiburon and Sin Rafatl. 

ttKFK liAVS-i.O a.m.. 9J0A.M. 11. « » .: 

3»r. x.oOOr. *.. 630 r. it. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An ixtratrln at 1 
■ •' v x .9J0A.M.. UlvOa.ii 
olvO r. «.. B:lfi r. ■. 

From San Rafael for San Francisco. 
WUUE DAYS-* -• > «.. 73H a. m., 9;S0 * a. 

11 H i «.. I M i- m .5:06 r.n. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An .•it™ trip at f. .10 r.». 
jl NDAYS— S 10 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 12:15 P. M. : S : <0r.». 
6:00 r. M.. 836 p. M. 

From Point Tiburon tor San Francisco. 
WKEK PAYS 6:50 A.M., 8:20 a.m.. 9:55 a.m.: 1:10 
P. M . 4:04 P. M.. 5l30 p. m. 
Saturday? only an extra trip at f>:55 p M 
rl'SHAYlM* A.M., 10.-O5 A.M.. 12:40 P.M.; 
4:O5r.M.,5:30p,M,.6:50p, M. 



Leave 3. F- 



Days. 



Sundays 



' Destination 



7:40a.m. 3:00a. m. PoWluma 
3:30 p.m. 9:30. v.M and 

5:00 P.M. 5:00p.m. Santa Rosa. 



ARRIVE IN S.F. 



Sundays ]£** 



10:40 a.m 
6:05 P.M 
7:25 P. M 



S:50a. m. 
10:30a.m 
fi:C5p.M. 



Fulton 

Windsor, 

7:40a.m. ... Healdsburg, ... I0:30a.m 

3:30p.m. S:00a.m. Litton Serines. 7:2.5p.m. 6.0'jp.m 

Cloverdale A 

Way Stations. 



7:40a. m. 3:00 a. m 



Hopland 
and I'kiah. 



:25p. m..6:05P.M. 



7:40a.m. 8:00a.m. Saerneville. 7:25p.m. 10:30a. m 

3:30 p. M. I . |6:05 P.M . 

7:40 A.M. 8:00 a. m. Sonoma and 10:40a. m.8:50a. m. 
5:00 p.m. 5:00 p. m Glen Ellen. 6:05p.M.l6:05p. M. 
7:40 a.m I 8:00 a.m I q„wtnT>ol I W:40 A.M I 10:30AM 
3:30p.m J 5:00p m I bebastopol | _ 6: Q5p. M | 6MrK 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, 
WUllts, Canto, Capella, Potter Valley, Sherwood 
Valley, and Mendocino City, Hydesville, Eureka, 
Booneville and Greenwood. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, Jl 50; to Santa Rosa, |2 25; to 
Healdsburg, 13 40; to Litton Springs, ?3.60; to Clo- 
verdale, J4 50; to Hopland, f5.70; to Ukiah, $6.75; 
to Guerneville, ?3.75: to Sonoma, ?1.50: to Glen 
Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2.25: to Litton Springs, $2.40; to Cloverdale, 
$3; to Ukiah, $4,50; to Hopland, $3.80 to Sebasto- 
pol, $1.80; to Guerneville, $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; 
to Glen Ellen, $1.20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomor, street, 
and 2 New ontgomery Street. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 

8. 8. "San Bias " Friday, Jan 23, 1891. 

at 12 O'CLOCK N09N, 

Taking freight and passengers direct for— 

ACAPULCO, 

CHAMPER1CO, 

SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, 

ACAJUTLA, 

LA LIBERT AD, 

LA UNION, 

PUNTA ARENAS, 
— AND — 

PANAMA, 
And via Acapulco for all lower Mexican and Cen- 
tral American ports. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 
S. 8. City of Rio db Janeiro, Ti-esday, Feb 3,1831, 

at 3 o'clock p. m., 
8. S. China, Thursday, Feb. 26th, 

at 3 o'clock p. M. 
8. 8. City of Peking, Saturday, March 21st, 1891, 

at 3 o'clock p. m. 
Round-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 

reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Omce, cor- 
ner First aud Brannan streets. 
Branch Office, 202 Fr.ont street. 

W. R. A. JOHNSON, 

Acting General Agent. 
George H. Rice, Traffic Manager. 
N. B.— Note change in hour of sailing of China 
Line Steamers. 



THE WOMAN'S RIGHTS WOMAN 
Slip l-t'lioinl in 111.- ii r» — reform *kirt 

Ami tha wore what rammbled a shirt; 

Bha'd ■ will «>f bar own 

Ami a deal »»f baokbonai 
Ami despised any girl who w.miM Bird 
She Insisted on wearing short hair, 
Which gave her a masculine air, 

And she carried a cane 

WHh an air of disdain 
That made people turn round ant! stare. 
To her clab ahe devoted her nights, 
Where she lectured about woman's rights. 

In detailing the woes 

Of her sex and their clothes, 
Sbe would rise to Depewian heights. 
She'd a husband whose first name was Steve 
Who oft at her conduct would grieve, 

But like the old, old coon 

Who fell from the balloon, 
He was •• not in it," you may believe. 
Her children all trembled with fear 
Whenever their mother came near; 

It was her delight 

To give them a fright, 
Which I think-don't you?-was quite queer. 
Sbe was well up in Latin and Greek, 
And could several languages speak; 

When her tongue was let loose 

She would pour out abuse 
Upon women who talked with a squeak. 
But this woman whom every one feared. 
Was completely and dreadfully "queered " 

Whene'er she addressed 

The simplest request 
To her cook, who in Erin was reared. 
For the cook — she was Irish — oh my! 
And she had a bad look in her eye, 

And a single " black look " 

From that big Irish cook 
Made the woman's rights woman just fly. 



OSCAR NEWHOUSE, the well-known 
mining man of Nevada county, left for 
home during the week, after a visit of some 
weeks in this city. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The stfaraers CITY OF PUEBLA, WALLA 
WALLA and UMATILLA, direct for VICTORIA, 
B C , and PUGET SOUND ports, at 9 a. m. every 
five days. 

The steamers sailing for Puget Sound ports at 
9 a. m. connect at Port Towusend with steamers 
for Alaska, 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
U. P. R'y Co. every four days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San Simeon, 
Cayucos, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Hu'Neme, San Pedro, LosAnge.es and San 
Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKT0N, Hum- 
boldt Bay, steamer CORONO, every Wednesday, 
at 9 a. m. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc , every 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 p. m, 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. 8., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf— Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company Wharf, 

For Honolulu Only, 

S. S. Australia (3C00 tons), Jan. 27, 1891, at 2 p. m. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 

Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer, 

Zealandia .Thursday, Feb, 5, 1891, at 3 p. m. 

Or immediately on arrival of the British mail. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRKCKELS & BROS., 
General Agents. 



l|«ur ft U 26 NEW STYLE FRINGE EMBOSSED, FLORAL, 
PJ H 111 II U PI HIDDEN NAME, to. CARDS, fi00 SORAP PICTURES, 
Ymca, to,, $5 Puzilo, Lulios' Arc RcYonlor, 1 Colendar. AGENTS' OUTFIT, 
Ud ipfi, all 10 oenW, GLOBE CARD CO., 0ENTER3RQQK,, CONS. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 
pAomc Bmm. 

TrMina Uava and nre Due to Arrive nt 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

l«at« | From De:ember IS. 1890 I arrive 

Hay ward*, Miles end Sat. Jews 

7 -Ma. 'Arram'tnA Redd I iig, vU Davis 
7:80a. BeOOnd CItM torOffdOD Ud BftSt, 

and flr>t clan loccllj < .i- \ 

h.-OOa. Marlines, Vallojo and Calls tog a ' :1 . iv 

*8:00a. ki Versno and ilsata Rosa 8.16 r, 

8.30 a. Nlles, Sau Jose, Stockton, [one, 
Hacramcuto, Marvsville, Oro- 
ville aud Red Bluff 4:46 P. 

9:00a. Lor Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakers-field, Mojave and East, 
Santa Barbara A LOfl Angeles. 10:15a. 
1200m. Haywards, Niles and Livermorc \ I > P. 
*1:00p. Sacramento River Steamers . *V.;00a. 
3:00 p. Haywards, Nilcs and San JoBe. . 9:46 A. 
4;00p. Sunset Route, Atlantic Expresi, 
Banta Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Demlug,El Paso, New Orleans 

aud East 8:45 p. 

4;00p. Martinez Vallejo, and Calistoga 9:46a. 

4:00 p. El Verauo aud Santa Rosa . *9.45 a. 

4:00 p. Latbrop and Stockton. 10:15 a. 

4:30p. Sacramento aud Knight's Laud- 
ing via Davis 10:15a. 

*4:30p. Niles aud Livermore *8-.45a. 

•4:30 p. Niles and Sau Jose *7:45p. 

. Niles and Sau Jose . . Jti:15 p. 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles aud SauJose.. 7:45a. 
7:00 p. Central Atlantic Express, Ogden 

and East... 12:16 p. 

17 p. Vallejo +8:45 p. 

9 :00 p. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Souud aud East.. 10.15 a. 



Santa Cruz Division. 



8:15a. Newark, Ceuterville, San Joae, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 5 :50 p. 

*2:15p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz *11:20a. 

4:15 p. Centerville, San Jose and Los 

Gatos 9 :50 a. 

+11:45 p. "Hunters' and Theatre" Train to 

Newark, San Jose & Los Gatos... J8.05P. 

Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 

8:30 a. San Jose, Almaden, Gilroy, Tres 
Pinos, Pajaro, SantaCruz, Mon- 
terey, Pacific Grove, Salinas, 
Soledad, San Miguel, Paso Ro- 
bles and Santa Margarita (San 
Luis Obispo) aud principal 

Way Stations 6:30 p. 

10:30A. San Jose, and Way Stations.. 300p. 

11 :20 a. Cemetery and Sau Mateo. 1:39 p. 

12:30 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park aud Way 

Stations . 5:05 P. 

*3:30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove 
aud principal Way Stations. ...*10:f5A. 
*4:20p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *7:56a. 

5:20 p. Sau Jose and Way Stations 9:03a 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. ... 6:35 a. 
+11:46 p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations +7:30 p. 



a. for Morning. 
♦Sundays excepted. 
**Monday s excepted. 



p. for Afternoon. 
+Saturdays only. 
^Sunda ys only. 



OCCIDENTAL AND OMENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama with 
SteamerBfor SHANGHAI: 

Steamer 1391 

Oceanic Thursday, January 22. 

Gaelic Saturday, February 14. 

Belqic. Tuesday, March 10. 

Oceanic Thursday, April 2. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Frau- 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, San 
Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H. RICE. Traffic Manager. 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

Santa Fe Koute. 

Trains Leave and Arrive at San Francisco 

(Market Street Ferry). 



Leave Daily. Fro* June 15, 1890. Arrive Daily. 



9:00 a. m. 
4:00 P. M. 



Fast Express via Mojave. 
Atlantic Express via Los 
Angeles. 



8:45 p. m. 
10:15 a. m. 



Ticket Office— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building, 
San Francisco. W. A. BISSELL, 

General Passenger Agent 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 



tftte 




Biffe 



"Lifi in California," by Alfred Robinson— William Doxey, S. P. 

THE first part of this book is a re-publication of a narrative, by 
the Pioneer of Pioneers, of a residence of many years in Cali- 
fornia, when it was a territory of Mexico. Leaving Boston in 
July, 1828, the vessel in which he sailed arrived in the Bay of 
Monterey in July, 1829, sixty-two years ago. The first part of the 
book describes life as it was in those days, and some events of in- 
terest up to 1846, and in the appendix the narrative is brought 
forward to the occupation of the country by the United States. 
The volume should be especially entertaining to all Californians, 
as well as to the general reading public desirous of information 
about California previous to the actual discovery of gold becoming 
known to the world. The book is well worth reading. 

"My Lady's Master," by Lady Maud Rutledge, " The Match- 
maker," by Beatrice Reynolds, and " Love's Labor Won," by 
Mrs. Emma Southworth, are the three latest issues in the 25 cent 
series of novels, published by T. B. Peterson & Bros., of Phila- 
delphia. This series, issued in a most convenient form, contains 
some of the choicest fiction, making it by far the cheapest and 
best collection of novels ever published. A vast amount of delight- 
ful and excellent reading matter is given in sufficient variety to 
please both young and old, grave and gay, and, in fact, all classes 
of romance readers. The works are by some of the leading writers 
of this country and Europe, and not a single volume, out of now 
nearly one hundred, has been chosen that is not first-class in every 
respect. All should read them, and every one can afford to get 
the entire series, thus securing for a moderate outlay enough en- 
tertaining literature to last for months. 

The character of the heroine in " My Lady's Master" is drawn 
from real life. Trials and troubles of true love that would not 
run smoothly, perils by Hood and field in Texas, scenes from 
fashionable life in New York, and quiet pictures of domestic 
hearthstones, wrought into a whole of such absorbing interest 
that not even the most jaded of novel readers will care to skip 
any of its pages. 

It is not easy to recall any writer who uniformly holds such 
high ground and treats with such power so many and such varied 
subjects as Beatrice Reynolds. In "The Matchmaker," she opens 
in a rich vein of inward life, while her pictures, with which the 
story is blended, have the freshness and vitality of truth. 

It would seem almost useless to recommend Mrs. Southworth's 
works, as their fame is well known over the entire world. This 
last work, " Love's Labor Won," well sustains her reputation. 



In the Forum for this month, among the various thoughtful 
articles, all instructive and interesting, is one from Mr. Thomas 
G. Shearman on the "Coming Billionaire." A year ago the same 
writer in the Forum showed that one-half of the national wealth 
was owned by 40,000 families, that three-sevenths was owned by 
250,000 families, and that there were seventy American estates 
averaging $35,000,000 each. The statement was contradicted 
at the time, but, in the current number of the Forum, he shows in 
his essay not only that his figures have not been discredited, but 
that they could not be, for, in the great majority of instances, they 
are based upon the most trustworthy information. Under the 
present system of Federal taxation, Mr. Shearman argues that 
our present two hundred millionaires would necessarily become 
billionaires in forty years, but he does not expect a billionaire at 
all, because he regards the present system of indirect taxation as 
doomed, and the early coming of direct federal taxation as inevi- 
table. 

This month comes to us the initial number of Goldthwaite's 
Geographical Magazine. So much interest in this science is now 
manifested, through, in a great measure, the influence of our Geo- 
graphical Societies, that this magazine comes in opportunely. The 
first number is full of instructive reading, and altogether excellent. 



PRAYERS will he offered up in the various churches and Syna- 
gogues for the large portion of our fellow-citizens, who had 
backed the unfortunate Dempsey. Com fort and consolation is sorely 
needed during this, the week of our great and unexpected distress. 
Indeed, throughout San Francisco Christendom there is a sad 
feeling. Men of law and medicine, and even preachers of the gospel 
looked quite despondent Thursday morning. Bank and insur- 
ance clerks have worn a grave and anxious expression. It be- 
hooves us merchants to watch our tills just now, and keep the 
combinations of our safes locked up in our bosoms. 

Invest in Lakeview Lots, and thereby lay up for vourself a future 
fortune. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by al 
druggistsand first-class grocers. Trade mark— star within ashield. 



H. 



M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping anil Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street. Sin Francisco, California. 



NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for — 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

Company, ; (L'd.), 

"The California Line of Clippers," J The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

from New York, Steel Rails and Track Material. 

" The Hawaiian Line of Packets," | 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

vOver 300 in Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, 8. 8. Hepworth's Centrl 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 

327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

8AN FRANOI8CO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

fJB" Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, 8hot aud 

Tha "Standard" M chine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 

Chamberlin Patents. 

J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST FOR 

American Rubber Co.'s Celebrated Rubber Boots and Shoes, 

HEAVY 

Gossamer, Mackintosh and Oil lothing, 

2 and 4 California St., San Francisco. Cal. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MIKING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OIL8 AND SUPPLIES. 

THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

GIANT POWDER OR DYNAMITE, NOBEL'S GELATINE, GELATINE 

DYNAMITE of various grades, JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED, 

BLACK BLASTING POWDER, CAPS AND FUSE. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., - - • General Agents 

30 1'allfornia Street. 



Arthur W. Moore. 



Harry F. Woods. 
Member Stock and Boud Exchange. 



WOODS & MOORE, 

STOCK AND BOND BROKERS. 



Investment securities of all kinds bought and sold on commission. Lib- 
eral advances made on approved securities. Stocks carried on margin. 

No. 438 California street, S. F. 



Jan 17, 1891. 



SAN Ki: \\i [S( 'i NEWS I ETTER. 



81 



^VprW.ThjFJ€sh^ 




THK fomion World say?: Mrs. Maok.iy'p husband ha* just pur- 
i"h»vl tin' ipWodld houM In Carlton House Tamo* on which 
indford expended * Utile on • a one hundred thousand pounds. 
There is nothing DON palatial in UondoD ( for the marbi- 

impleted, alone cost twantap thousand ponndSt 
ami all the rooms have baan fitted up in the most magnificent 
manner. Mrs. Muckay does not take poaaaaaion till the spring, 
and in the meantime the whole of her Qoballna tapestry, antique 
furniture, statuary and pictures, are to be brought from Paris. 
Mr Mackay's home, as far as Europe is OOUOerned, will hence- 
forth be in London, and the tirst ent< rtainment given in his new 
bouse will be one of the moat sensational events of the coming 
season. Mr. Sandford has devoted a fortune to the preparation of 
his ideal abode, when the recent financial crisis necessitated his 
selling it before he had ever inhabited it. One of the indirect ef- 
fects of the krach has been to give Mrs. Mackay the finest house 
in London. 



One of the " sweet revenges " of time — a demonstration of the 
resurrection of " truth crushed to eartb," is the recent re-publi- 
cation of Mary Wolstoncraft's » Vindication of the Rights of 
Women," first published in 1794, and which met with a storm of 
religious vituperation, second only to that which greeted Paine's 
"Age of Reason." But in the whirligig of time it is now not only 
given the honor of a re-publication by a first-class publisher, with 
a complimentary introduction by Millicent fiarrett Fawcett, 
mother of Engtand'9 girl senior wrangler, but is offered as a pre- 
mium and desirable Christmas book by the Boston Woman's Jour- 
nal, which Is nothing if not conservative in religion; while the 
staid New York Independent, in its notice of the work, confesses 
that "public opinion has now approached to substantially Mary 
Wolstoncraft's position on the woman question." 

— St. Louis Spectator. 

Rod and Gun gives this splendid story about Mr. Herbert Spen- 
cer, the famous philosopher. It appears that fee is fond of a game 
of billiards, and recently sauntered into the billiard-room at the 
Senior Carlton, and invited a nice young major, who was the only 
person there, to take a cue. The major did so. Beginning to play 
with deliberation, the great philosopher gave a miss in baulk. 
His opponent cannoned off the red, and left off at thirty-seven, 
with all the balls out of play. Mr. Spencer made another miss. 
Then the major ran out. " Sir," the philosopher said, as he grave- 
ly put his cue into its case, '< a certain dexterity in games of skill 
indicates a well-balanced mind, but expertness, such as you have 
displayed, is strong presumptive evidence of an ill-spent youth. 
I wish you good afternoon." 



The Empress of Germany has military tastes as well as her hus- 
band. At the late grand review on Templehorfield, before her 
confinement, she was in the saddle for two hours, riding superbly 
and leading her own regiment of cuirassiers past the emperor. 
Her uniform as colonel was a habit of white cloth, embroidered 
on shoulders and collar, with the red and silver colors of the regi- 
ment and a three-cornered white felt hat, with many ostrich 
feathers, in which she looked remarkably pretty. 

There is a very pretty and eminently French story told to the 
effect that a woman on the witness stand, on being asked her 
age and replying that she was thirty, waa asked if she had not 
given the same age when before the magistrate a couple of years 
previous. " I think it very likely," she answered coolly. " I 
am not one of those women who say one thing to-day, and quite 
another to-morrow." 

A prominent clergyman gives this description of the life of a 
minister: " My experiences with churches make me think that 
ministers are like cats. When you go to a new place first every- 
body says, 'Come pussy! come pussy I nice pussy I ' and you 
come. Then they begin to rub your fur and say, < Poor pussy! 
poor pussy!' and after a while they say 'Scat!'" 

Mr. Gladstone is the owner of the largest lead pencil in the 
world. It is the gift of a pencil maker at Keswick and is thirty- 
nine inches in length. In place of the customary rubber cap it 
has a gold cap. Its distinguished owner uses it for a walking 
stick. 



Pedro d'AIcantara, who, up to a year ago, was known, as Dom 
Pedro the Second, emperor of Brazil, despite his age and his un- 
certain health, is enjoying Paris to the full. Every day sees him 
going about like a young man. 

Gold, invested in Lakeview lots, will bring in big returns. Note 
the many improvements in the immediate vicinity of Lakeview. 



THE DEL8ECK 



IHE mm 

THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE 





THE 1 BRUT. 



The highest grade of Champagne without 
sweetness. 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(Established 1725, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oils. 




JAMES DE FREMERY & CO., - San Francisco, 

General Agents, Pacific loa-l. 

£TNA MINERAL"WATER COMPANY 

Invites Public Attention to the Justly Celebrated 

/ETNA NATURAL MINERAL WATER, 

One of the Invaluable Resources of this Wonderful State, and ch al 
lenges comparison of its demonstrated and acknowledged merits with 
those of any other Mineral Water, native or foreign. Citizens and 
families of San Francisco, who have used .2ETNA since it was put on 
the market, pronounce ik— either as a Beverage and Table Water, or 
as a Preserver and Restorer of Health— Superior to any other known 
Mineral Water. Leading Physicians here and throughout the State 
recommend its daily use by both sick and well. 



yEtna Mineral Water Co. 

104, 106 and 108 Drumm St., S. F. 

TELEPHONE 536. 

LOUIS SLOSS & CO., 

AGENTS FOB THE 

iec a. ir, Xj tt ik: i 

And other well-known Brands of Alaska Canned Salmon, 

310 Sausome Street, San Francisco, California. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Flielan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for posi 
tively extracting teeth without pain. " Colton Gas " has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all cases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1B63. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
alloperationsindentistry. ^ CHARLES W. DECKER. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 17, 1891. 




NO great burning question is just nuw absorbing the attention 
of the European Chancelleries. The only factor in European 
politics at the present moment, worthy of note, is the recent 
memorandum of Queen Natalie to the Servian Deputies, which 
nii£ ht re- >pen the Eastern Question, by precipitating a Servian 
revolution. Her agitation is really against her own son, the boy 
King Alexander. In her determined movement for political as- 
cendency the ex-Queen of Servia is allowing herself to be made 
the figure-head of the party which is plotting for Karageorgevitch 
and the ruin of the Obrenovitch dynasty. Like the mother of 
Hannibal, she is working for the destruction of her own son, 
moved not by illicit love like her, but by political passion. It is 
a wonder that the Government does not drive her from the 
country; but they appear inclined to allow her to remain in Bel- 
grade, and affect to ignore her existence, so long as she does noth- 
ing to provoke a breach of the peace. 

In England's foreign policy, the great achievement of Lord 
Salisbury's Administration has been the settlement of the trouble- 
some questions with respect to the political and commercial 
spheres of influence in Africa between England, France and 
Germany. The claims of Italy have yet to be adjusted, but a 
friendly difference of opinion is the only passing obstacle to a 
satisfactory arrangement. The petulance of Portugal will, in all 
probability, yield to the generous forbearance that a great power 
can afford to show a weak one. The compensation that can be 
given to France for the treaty rights in the Newfoundland fish- 
eries, the maintenance of which just at present threatens conflict 
and revolt, is a question to be answered by statesmanship, which 
answer is not yet forthcoming, as far as we know. That Prince 
Bismarck should have been wiped out, to all appearances, from 
public life, that Germany should be the more confident and 
Europe the more tranquil for his effacement, has been the great 
political event and surprise of the past year in Europe. 

The nine days wonder over the Parnell business is passed, and 
the interest of the world in the matter is dying out. In regard 
to the late conference at Boulogne none of thestatements hitherto 
made about it appear to be authentic. There is yet very great 
doubt as to Messrs. O'Brien and Dillon siding with the majority. 
It looks more likely that they will commit themselves to neither 
side in the quarrel, but possibly avail themselves of the Crimes 
Court sentence and take refuge in one of " Mr. Balfour s Hotels " 
for the six months of the Parliamentary Session, or perhaps re- 
main abroad and "wait till the clouds roll by." It does not 
appear to be in their power to bring about a reconciliation. The 
schism must now be considered final and complete, and while 
Parnellism may yet regain its ascendency there is not much 
doubt but that the doom of Gladstonism is sealed. The cable 
reports that Parnell has abandoned all idea of resuming the 
leadership of the Irish party. 

The most serious recent event, by far, in British industry, has 
been the tremendous strike of the railroad employes in Scotland. 
The operation of the Scotch railroads has been substantially sus- 
pended, the shipyards on the Clyde nearly closed for want of fuel, 
and other industrial operations have been brought to the same 
pass. A bitter contest is also apprehended in Belgium on account 
of the reduction of the coal miners' wages. These disturbances 
of the labor world abroad are but indications of what will surely 
happen to a greater extent later on. The relations of capital and 
labor in Europe must yet undergo a serious strain, and probably 
important changes in the next few years, and as the conditions 
are improved there, and the cost of production is increased, the 
competitive pressure upon the laboring classes of the United 
States will be naturally diminished in proportion. A late cable 
reported that about 3,000 dock laborers at Dundee had agreed to 
go on strike if such action on their part was found necessary to 
bring about a settlement of the railroad disputes, and the hopes 
of the Glasgow strikers had been considerably increased in con- 
sequence. 

German ideas of how to civilize Africa are, without a doubt, 
peculiar. A vessel is going to carry out a cargo of Krnpp moun- 
tain guns and all apparatus necessary for founding a brewery. 
The savage, we imagine, is to be made a customer for lager beer 
or be shot down There are to be twelve brewers on board this 
strangely laden vessel. They may, possibly, get among cannibals 
who will wash them down with their own lager beer. 

The representatives of all the Foreign Powers (or Barbarians as 
they are familiarly termed) are to be congratulated on the conces- 
sion recently obtained of being next month admitted to the pres- 
ence of the Son of the Moon, alias the Emperor of China. It is 
worthy of note that his Imperial Majesty has further informed 
the foreign ministers that be will repeat the trying ordeal each 
succeeding year. It must be that the young Emperor is by de- 



grees ridding himself of the control of the Empress, who is Re- 
gent. 

E&YPf AND PALESTINE. 

IN our Christmas number Senator Jeremiah Lynch, whose book, 
" Egyptian Sketches," invited universal admiration, contributed 
an interesting article on Egypt and Palestine. A line in the arti- 
cle evidently did not please Thos. Cook & Son, as may be im- 
plied from a communication they sent us. Senator Lynch has 
replied to this letter. That Cook & Son's methods of conducting 
tours may be thoroughly understood, both their letter and Senator 
Lynch's reply are here given: 

2 il-62 Broadway, New York, Dec. 30, 1890. 

Editor San Francisco News Letter— Dear Sir: Our attention has been 
called to a statement made in your issue of Dec. 25th, 1890. on page 
28. under the heading " Egypt and Palestine," wherein the writer says, 
" that abomination, Cnok. etc. 

We are entirely at a loss to understand what can have induced your 
correspondent to make such an uncalled-for, unjust and untrue state- 
ment, and can only think ihat there must have been a mistake made 
in transcribing his notes. 

You must be aware that a statement of this kind is apt to do us an 
injury in the minds of your re.iders. who are not acquainted with the 
true position of the case, and we, therefore, trust you will, as a mat- 
ter of justice, immediately correct the statement made. 

We have instructed Mr. D. G. Paine, who will present this letter, to 
give you any information you may desire regarding our arrange- 
ments in Egypt and elsewhere, in "order to disprove the statement 
made by your correspondent. Yours truly, Thomas Cook & Son. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15, 1891. 

Editor News Letter— Dear Sir: The accompanying letter, which 
I re-enclose to you, invites a response. The observations that the 
writer protests against embrace three lines only of your journal. 
I suppose the gravemen of his objection lies in the use of the word 
"abomination" in connection with the Messrs. Cooks' service. 
Would he have had us use some more palatable adjective? It is 
certainly true that while, nominally, people who travel on Cooks' 
tickets are sent to the best hotels, yet they are given the second- 
class rooms. For their coupons are subject to a uniform discount 
of 10 per cent, at the office or agency of Cook when paid, and hotel 
people reserve the best apartments for those who pay in gold. Then, 
unless one has special arrangements, which are quite expensive. 
Cook carries his tourists around in troops, like a flock of sheep un- 
der the care of a black shepherd, who is usually, at least in the 
Orient, both ignorant and insolent. Who has not read Ludovic 
Halevy's humorous tale of a lot of Cook's people taken to Versailles 
and back to Paris — twenty miles — in a single morning. How thev 
are railroaded through the Louvre in forty-five minutes, and their 
cicerone says, " Vuita! There is a painting of Kubens; this is 
something by Titian: here is a picture from the hand of Raphael. 
A lions!" and on they have to go like the Wandering Jew, without 
even so much as a single moment's pause before the priceless can- 
vasses. And then Cook does not keep his promises. There is in the 
city now a mother and daughter, who, after purchasing first-class 
tickets for Palestine and the Levant at Cook's agency in Cairo, 
were compelled to take second class accommodations on a steamer 
leaving Beyrout for Constantinople. They have so terrorized the 
good old dragoman and reis or dahabeeyah Captains in Egypt, 
that these latter worthies are sometimes actually afraid to contract 
with an independent traveler without first obtaining the implied 
sanction of Cook. They have broken the delicious silence of the 
Egyptian past by the wheezy whistles of their penny-a-liner steam- 
ers', and invaded the quiet peacefulness of the Nile witha lot of per- 
sons who don't know the difference between an obelisk and a factory 
chimney. They placard the Moslem streets of Cairo with broad 
posters, announcing the cheapness and rapidity of a voyage on 
one of their old tubs, and took crowds of people to Lamore and the 
First Cataract last year for about five dollars a day! The Egyptians 
don't want them, and all lovers of the picturesque and the past 
abhor Cook with his modern trumpery. If people go to the Orient 
I suggest that they travel on their own resources, or stay at home. 
Sincerely Yours, Jeremiah Lynch. 

AMMONIA. 

THE name of the chemical agent, ammonia, dates back tore- 
mote antiquity. In Europe the chief source of the supply of 
ammonia, up to the latter part of the last century, was Egypt. It 
was originally made from camels' dung, collected in the vicinity 
of the temple of Jupiter Ammon — hence the name, ammonia. 
The droppings were collected in March and April by Arabs, then 
dried and burned, and the soot collected. This was sold to 
merchants, and ammonia was collected from the soot by a chem- 
ical process. It is now made almost entirely from crude gas 
liquor in illuminating gas manufactories. Only one-half as much 
ammonia is made in summer as in winter; hence ammonia is 
always more costly in summer. Furthermore, ammonia is ex- 
tensively used in the manufacture of artificial ice. Ammonia is 
one of the products of putrefaction of animal organic matter. It 
is found in sewage and in stable drainage. Chemists measure the 
amount of sewage contamination by the presence of ammonia. 
By tests now employed, one part of ammonia can be detected in 
200,000,000 parts of water. One part of ammonia in 50,000,000 
parts of water is enough to cause the water to be condemned as 
unsafe. 

The blood-cleansing qualities of Ayer's Sarsaparilla render it in- 
valuable in skin disorders. 

Good girl, I'm glad that you for once are wise, I knew that Muller would 
make clear your eyes. 



News Better 

California ACibcrttsc v. 

OfVOTCO TO TMt LE%OiNO»HTi«ESTSO» CALIFORNIA AM D THE Pacific COAST. 

Printed and ;'- prietor, Prbi 

M tlMi "' ■ ' PVan- 

Cuco. Annual Subfcrt: fatef*, I'mtfd Staffs nut! 

Canada. $4; 6 monf. | montta, 91 ■■ |5; 

6 months, $3; 3 monf*'. $1 

SAN FRANCISCO, SATl'RDA V. JANUARY 24, 1891. 



IS the Legislature going to allow ns to have electric street cars 
or n-'t " Keep your eye on the member who says he wants to 
consider the question, and keep your hand on your pocket at the 
same tune. 



HENRY CABOT LODGE announces that he is proud of his 
grandfather. Old Mr. Cabot'a fortunate absence from the 
world relieves him from the embarrassment of being asked 
whether he is proud of his grandson. 



TALLY one stolen Senator in New Hampshire. With two from 
Montana, that makes three. The wires are all laid for the 
theft of another in Illinois, and another in Kansas. Before long 
the Senator who does not grace a stolen seat will be as unfash- 
ionable as a virtuous woman at a Pavilion masquerade. 



THE Oceanic Steamship Company's steamer Zcalandia beat the 
Afonmr&i handsomely on the run to this port, but neverthe- 
less the odds in favor of the foreign company were too great, and 
the Zealand in has been withdrawn. If Congress had any time to 
devote to business the American line to Australia might be saved, 
but with the Force bill, the rebellion, and the Virginia and Ken- 
tucky resolutions of 1798 to discuss, it is obviously impossible to 
devote any attention to trivialities of that kind. 



MK. HALL, the gentleman who took advantage of the confi- 
dence of two widows to rob them of their entire fortunes, has 
some wealthy Eastern relatives who are said to be on their way 
out here to do what they can for him. The best thing they can 
do for him is to remove him from the influence of the unwise ad- 
visers who prevented him from ridding his anthropoid body of 
whatever corresponds to a soul. As the Jekyll in him died at 
least eight years ago he ought, in common humanity, to be al- 
lowed to kill the Hyde. 



THE COUNTY SEAT CRAZE. 

THERE is nothing less easily comprehensible to the metropoli- 
tan mind than the arid scramble of rural towns for the honors 
and emoluments attaching to the possession of county offices. 
To be a county seat is an ambition that submerges all business 
sense, not to speak of political principle and common honesty. 
The last two Legislatures were the battlefields of the warring 
clans from Colusa. This year the Colusa tribesmen have descend- 
ed upon Sacramento again, and now they are reinforced by bands 
of ghost dancers from Los Angeles, San Bernardino and San Diego. 
The Colusa question, which is typical of all the rest, is simply 
whether a new county shall be cut off from Colusa, with Willows 
as the county seat. The merchants of Willows think that the 
trade of a set of county officers, together with that of jurors, wit- 
nesses, litigants and people coming to town to pay their taxes, 
would be worth money to them. The merchants of Colusa object 
to losing any part of these advantages now in their possession. 
This is all easy enough to understand, but what is not so easily 
understood is why the people rate the profits of county-seatship 
so high as they do. The Glenn County proposition has been before 
three successive legislatures. Each side must, have spent at least 
$50,000 at each session. If Colusa County taxes herself $100,000 
every two years to convince the Legislature of the advantages and 
disadvantages of having two sets of county officers instead of one, 
does she get her money's worth? It is not only from a financial 
point of view that the craze for new county seats comes high. It 
makes heavy demands in the domains of politics and morals. 
Party ties dissolve before it. For the past four years there have 
been no Democrats or Republicans in Colusa County; there have 
been only divisionists and anti-divisionists. In 1888, the year of 
the Presidential election, Colusa, the banner Democratic County 
of California, elected a Republican Assemblyman, because the 
Democratic candidate came from the Glenn end of the county, 
and was thought to be favorable to division. AH the old preju- 
dices against bribery have disappeared. The vortex of corruption 
in the last Legislature, around which all the other jobs revolved, 
was notoriously the Glenh County deal. Is it not time for the 
warring grangers to take an account of stock, and see whether 
they are engaged in a profitable business? 



THE G* S OPPORTUNITY 

Tn R Sacramento . orreepondenta in agreed thai tha removal <-f 
Warden Ud orub baa been determined niton, and tha appear- 
anoea an tbal way. There would have been no oaoae and no n 
onae for the withdrawal <>( Mr. OempbeU'l nami from oorj 
lion by tin- BanaU as n Prison Director, bnl that he waa Known to 
favor tin- retention ol General ftfoOomb. The Chairman of tha 
Republican Btatc Convention baa been made to give way to the 
Chairman of the Republican state Committee, stump has su- 
perseded Campbell, bw ; raaomably moTa In accord with 
the Executive. That meam that by a majority of one the Hoard 
of Prison Directors will vots to declare the Wardenship vacant. 
It is generally believed that a place i* thus being made for ex- 
Bheriff Hale. <<( Alameda County. Of that gentleman we know 
nothing belter or worse than that he is a politician and a chronic 
OfflOQ seeker. If the management of the Penitentiaries of the 
State Is to he taken bark into politics, and their patronage to be 
deemed fair political spoil, there is nothing to be said against the 
manner of MeComb's contemplated removal, and in that case, 
Hale is probably about as good a successor as he could have, lint 
the New Constitution clearly contemplated a very different con- 
dition of things. That instrument intended that the State Pris- 
ons should be taken out of politics, and kept out. The intention 
was that dismissals should only be made for cause, and after an 
open and public investigation, and we very much question 
whether they can be legally made in any other way. That was 
the opinion of Governor Perkins when he appointed Messrs. 
Watt, Gibbs and Mills a Board to investigate the allegations made 
against the management of Warden Ames, and it must have been 
the opinion of Governor Stoneman's legal advisers when they 
counseled him as to the action to be founded upon their report. 
It must also have been the view taken by the four succeeding ad- 
ministrations that have retained Warden McComb. Appointed by 
Governor Perkins, be was retained and promoted from Folsom to 
San Quentin by Governor Stoneman, and both Governors Bart- 
lett and Waterman abstained from laying hands on an office 
they did not deem part and parcel of the spoils system. It may 
be proper to remove the present Warden; his management may 
have been inefficient and wasteful; but, if so, there will be no 
difficulty in the way of demonstrating the facts by an investiga- 
tion, and that ought to be done; otherwise the new appointee 
will go out with the present administration, and the rule of suc- 
cession will obtain in violation of the spirit and intention of the 
law, and to the final demoralization of our penal system. But 
that the Wardenship is now to be declared vacant we have no 
manner of doubt. In that case Governor Markham is face to 
face with the opportunity of his term. The vacated office should 
be filled by an exceptional man; one who is thoroughly in touch 
with the grand achievements of recent years in the matter of 
prison management. Penology has become almost an exact sci- 
ence. If the road is now clear, why not select a Warden regard- 
less of politics, and make a fair start on the road towards render- 
ing San Quentin a truly deterrent and reformatory institution? 
No act that the new State administration could possibly perform 
would more surely or more permanently redound to its honor and 
to the credit of the State. 



A CHANCE FOR A TEST. 



BETWEEN the United States and the Sandwich Islands there 
is no telegraph line nor any means of communication except 
by the slow method of transmission of news by steamers or sail- 
ing vessels. The death of King Kalakaua in this city was an 
event of profound interest to the people of the Hawaiian King- 
dom. Where, then, could a better test be imagined for the as- 
sertions of the Blavatsky school of theosophists with regard to 
thought transference, the projection of astral bodies, the diffusion 
and commingling of intelligences, and all the rest of it, than here? 
In other words, if the pretensions of Madame Blavatsky and her 
followers have any foundation, why did not some adept convey 
the news of the death of Kalakaua to Honolulu by the spiritual 
telegraph as soon as the king had drawn his last breath? To do 
so would have been a demonstration of the validity of the claims 
advanced by the theosophists, and it would not be any more diffi- 
cult than many of the feats asserted to have been performed al- 
ready. But here a word of caution is necessary. In the event 
that it shall be claimed that such a thing was successfully done, 
the public will be warranted in withholding its full belief in the 
thing until there is satisfactory evidence of the receipt of the re- 
turn message. It is very easy to say that the intelligence was 
conveyed to Honolulu at once, but there must be proof of the 
receipt of it and its acknowledgment at the time, before we can 
be expected to be thoroughly converted to the theosophic faith. 
It is like ringing the District Telegraph call for a messenger — we 
want to hear the bell tinkle at our end of the wire to be cer- 
tain the call has reached its destination. If this evidence can be 
furnished, telegraph stock will take a downward turn, and tele- 
phone companies will be shorn of much of their enormous profits. 
The test proposed is certainly a fair one, and no genuine theoso- 
phist ought to refuse it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 



FACTS AS TO FOREIGN COMMERCE. 

KHERE is a very natural desire in this country to increase 
foreign commerce. Trade wins money, and money " makes 

the mare to go." As a people we are not behind, but are 
-»- rather ahead of the rest of the world in our love of "the 

root of all evil." We want foreign commerce because 
there is money in it, and because it is becoming more and more 
essential to the progress and development of the country. We 
have effectually walled in our home markets, and, thereby, fenced 
foreign competitors out. There is nothing more to be gained in 
that direction. Now we need nothing so much as room to " spread 
ourselves " abroad. We want to commercially conquer an area 
that will permit of our further expansion. The era of local over- 
production is upon us, especially in the Eastern and New England 
States. We must find an outlet for a rapidly increasing surplus 
of labor's products, or immigration must be stopped, and the 
country's development arrested. We may not want any more 
new worlds to conquer — about which some of us are not quite 
certain — but there can be no question of the fact that we badly 
need to bring the market of as many other countries as possible 
within our commercial sway. How that would be possible of ac- 
complishment if every country followed our example of fencing 
in its home market we do not pretend to say. It is a problem 
that seems to usrtnsoluble, and, therefore, we pass it by. Hap- 
pily for the United States, the manifold excellencies and beauties 
of McKinleyism are not discerned by all the world, and, as a con- 
sequence, there remain unclosed foreign markets in which our 
commerce may expect to be welcomed by a generous hospitality — 
that is to say, it may if our wares are at ^least as good and as 
cheap as are obtainable from others. Our newspapers claim, and 
the London Times seems to concede it, as a fact that American 
skill is beating the Sheffield cutlers in their own market. Our 
edged tools are the best and cheapest. That's the rub! With the 
price and quality all right, there is no limit to the possible ex- 
pansion of our foreign commerce. But the nations of the Earth 
may well be excused for being unprepared to do business with 
us, and for denying that we can manufacture either well or 
cheaply. They have our own word for it that we cannot. We 
say that our manufacturers can only hold their home market by 
means of enormous protective duties, without which, we are told, 
there would not be a prospering industry in all the land. If that 
be true, it is clear that the time has not yet arrived for talking 
about the acquirement of a foreign trade. It would be idle to 
subsidize ships to carry cargoes that could not be sold at our 
prices. Thus we are brought to the logical and inevitable con- 
clusion that the thing to do is to make cheap manufacturing 
possible. 

That means raw materials free of duty, exemption from local 
taxation, low charges for freight by land and water, freedom 
from strikes, and, above all, cheap labor. We can place no favor- 
ing toll upon the ocean-highway of the nation's foreign com- 
merce. That is a track that is free for all upon equal terms. The 
McKinley blockade is only effective around our own borders. If 
we would strike out into the region beyond, we must discard 
everything that places us at a disadvantage. We must see that 
all the conditions essential to successful competition are favor- 
able, and, until they are, it is idle to expect overmuch from for- 
eign trade. Are we prepared for such a change of policy? Is 
either labor or capital willing to make the sacrifices necessary to 
cheap production? If they are not, let us be honest with our- 
selves and confess that the idea of competing in the markets of 
the world with anything but the products of our soil, is a will-o'- 
the-wisp that it is folly to chase any longer. If we will not make 
our country a cheap mart in which to buy, it will delude nobody 
but ourselves to talk about selling. In that case we would do 
well to cease boasting of our capacity to build ships for which 
there is no freight, abandon the World's Columbian Fair as a 
means of advertising goods for which there are no purchasers at 
our price, and admit, as cheerfully as we may, that although the 
race for foreign commerce is an exceedingly tempting one, we 
are » not in it." 

Yet why should not we accept the conditions that would give 
us cheap manufactures and a foreign* trade? The adoption of 
Free Trade (using the term in the sense in which it is employed 
by the so-callfd political economists) is by no means a condi- 
tion necessarily essential to winning commerce. Every industry 
that ought to be protected can be protected, and cheapen manu- 
factures at the same time. There is no sense in taxing coal, iron, 
hides, lumber, wool and the like. These are the products of 
nature, and involve the employment of little or no labor that 
needs protecting. Yet they are the raw products that enter into 
most manufactures. Cheapen them and you cheapen the finished 
article. Make clothing, household utensils, etc., cheap, and you 
lower the money cost of labor without subtracting from the pur- 
chasing power of its wages. With free materials there would be 
cheap ships, and wiLh them there would be profitable freights and 
a carrying trade. It is still true that it is a condition and not a 
theory that confronts us. Without lessening the vitality of our 
protective system, it would be very possible to adopt economic 
measures that would cheapen production and extend trade. 



BAD SIGNS OF THE TIMES. 

THERE are two social phenomena which cannot be regarded 
with equanimity by any who cherish a belief in the continu- 
ous progress and advancement of the human family, or who be- 
lieve that modern civilization is the perfected fruit of ages of mis- 
take and trial that have gone before. One is the evident disin- 
clination to marriage, the other is the lack of courtesy on the 
pare of men towards women. It is to be observed that the dislike 
to assuming marital obligations is not confined to one sex alone, 
nor to the class whose defective moral training in youth might 
lead them to hold the marriage bond lightly; but men and women 
of the highest, culture and the most careful education, gravely dis- 
cuss the question of whether marriage is not a failure, and 
whether the doctrine of elective affinity, a soul selection, or some 
other notion of the same sort, be not the true well of life, instead 
of the married state, which has so long been held in reverence and 
esteem by all civilized nations. Possibly the other vice of the 
age, the growing disrespect to, and neglect of women by men, 
may be a corollary of tuis proposition; but whether or no, it can 
not fail to escape the attention of any observer that at the present 
day men wait to be courted and flattered, and sought after by 
women, rather than take up the part which properly and natur- 
ally belongs to them, that of making the advances to the weaker 
sex. It is obvious that the growth of this pernicious habit must 
blunt the edge of that fine courtesy and chivalric manner which 
have been the hall-mark of a true gentleman for so many years, 
and must put the male of the sex in the light of an Eastern 
potentate in his seraglio, each of his women waiting in breathless 
expectancy for the handkerchief of her lord and master to be 
thrown. To any one who knows the innate vanity and self-con- 
ceit of the self-styled lords of creation, the demoralizing effect of 
this unwarranted adulation and fulsome incense-burning needs no 
explanation. It results in increasing the selfishness, which all 
men have to a greater or less degree, and in convincing them 
that they are made of finer clay than the opposite sex. From 
this fool's paradise to a state of general celibacy, is an easy 
transition. The man, pampered by theattentions of silly women, 
and flattered by their advances, naturally asks himself why he 
should tie himself to one woman when he can range at will in a 
whole rosebud garden of girls and women; why he should take 
upon himself a burden when there are so many willing hands to 
relieve him of it and carry it for him; and, indeed, how he can 
possibly consent to place his affections on one object, at the risk 
of making half a hundred lovely beings uncomfortable, if not 
desperately jealous. The women are to blame for this condition 
of things, from which they are the chief sufferers. If they would 
maintain that reserve which is one of the chief charms of woman- 
hood, and wait to be wooed instead of being so ready to do the 
wooing themselves, there would be no trouble. The pole needs 
not to turn to the magnet, for the needle, if let alone, will surely 
find its true direction, even though it be sometimes affected by 
local disturbing causes. Marriage would again become an honor- 
able estate, and the true and proper relations of the sexes would 
be restored. 



DR. KOCH'S LYMPH. 



THAT wise old king, who deplored so many years ago the lack 
of anything new under the sun, had gazed into the future 
ages beyond his time, and recognized the futility of man's attempts 
at originality. For the past few weeks the world has been ring- 
ing with news of the wondrous discovery of Dr. Koch. To all 
corners of the globe was spread the amazing intelligence that at 
last had been found — something — a lymph, that would set at de- 
fiance the all-conquering consumption. The medical profession 
had a fresh topic for grave discussion, pro and con. Sufferers 
from the dread disease reached out eagerly for the new life-giving 
agent- All attention was riveted on the one man and his marvel- 
ous secret, the nature of which has been the subject of various 
conjectures. And now, behold I the secret is revealed; the won- 
derful lymph is explained, and it proves, after all, to be an old, 
old story; so old, it dates back to the seventeenth century, when 
a German physician, one Dr. Fludd, in a dissertation on 
■« Phthisis," as it was then called, speaks of a remedial agent. In 
this pamphlet, or book, entitled » Philosophia Moysaica," and 
published at Goudae, a town of the Middle Ages, in 1638, occurs 
the following sentence: " Sputum rejectum a pulmorino post debitam 
praeparationem curat phthisin." Latin was the language of learning 
at that period, and was especially used by those interested in the 
sciences. The quoted sentence shows clearly that the old Ger- 
man physician anticipated our modern Koch by several hundred 
years. That the later medico profited by the wisdom of his pre- 
decessor in the science of medicine is open for conjecture, it Spu- 
tem," etc., translated into English, reads somewhat like this: 
*< That the sputa, or expectoration from the lungs, properly 
treated, should cure phthisis, or consumption." Practically the 
same theory as that of Dr. Koch, who announces that his lymph 
is the tubercular matter expelled from diseased lungs. The ex- 
treme similarity of the two ideas naturally suggests that either 
the Doctor is parading in borrowed plumes, or that, verily, 
nothing is new, even a possible cure for consumption. 



J»n. 24. 1891, 



BAN PR INGISH NEWS T BTTER. 



CONSERVATION OF TRUSTS. 

T T ha.* become loo nitirh (he custom in the present day to think 

t little of the dead, and dishonor their bequrHs. had 01 
( | We hsve seen msn after man die, men who hsvr mad* their 
million* amongst us. bequeathing their property— 80 ro a to 
their relation*, pom* to charities, olhen to thai Dooondiiloned 
affair which is called •• trust." Now, what we are trying to gel 
at i* this, Can not some law be framed ta meal the 
point, and so hedge round executors and administrators of es- 
taMM, that we shall not be blushing!} confronted by the spectacle 
of administrator after administrator robbing the widow and 
orphan before our vyv*' Take en instance. A man dies, end 
Imagines that his wife and family are well provided for. He 
leaves his estate in trust, and has it so worded in hie will that it 
shall be utilized f^r the hem-lit of those a horn he thought dearest 
upon Earth. He leaves it in charge of one or more of his beet 
friends, to be invested in such valuable securities as seem best to 
them. Child-like confidence is good, but will it buy meals for the 
widowed mother and starving orphan? This supposititious man — 
unfortunately not loo much supposititious — dies, as we have said, 
and leaves behind him whatever wealth he had been enabled to 
accumulate. The property he left behind him, if he was a sensi- 
ble man, would have been invested in good securities, so as to 
bring in a running income for his wife and family. But there are 
numbers ot men who are not over-gifted with sense, and it is for 
the benefit of these that some beneficial legislation might be made. 
Could not a law be framed to hedge round this very numerous 
class with safeguards? It is only last week that we witnessed a 
glaring instance of breach of trust, which has resulted in the ruin 
of two ladies, who had every reason to look forward to days of 
affluence and freedom from care. Mrs. Hawley and Mrs. Bald- 
win were left by their respective husbands more than usually 
well provided for in the matter of this world's goods, and it was 
only owing to a laxity of supervision over their affairs that they 
are now plunged in tbe slough of despond. It is not argued that 
Mr. Hall, who had charge of the estates of these ladies, was so 
utterly lost to every instinct of decency and honor, as to have 
gone deliberately to work to ruin them out of sheer malice, pre- 
pense, and for the very lust of doing so. On the contrary, the 
inference is the other way. Mr. Hall was considered, and doubt- 
less was, at one time, a man of upright motives, who had honestly 
won the esteem and confidence of the gentlemen who had left him 
in charge of their estates. He was, doubtless, no worse than 
many another man placed in the same position in our midst to- 
day. It was not the mere fact of his falling from grace, and 
speculating with funds over which he had unlimited control, with 
the very natural idea of bettering his fortunes, that led to the sad 
results which we have seen. Had his speculations been con- 
ducted with shrewdness and judgment, and eventuated success- 
fully, the probability is that no one would have been one whit 
the wiser. Mr. Hall would have continued to enjoy the confidence 
and respect of the community, while the ladies with whose prop- 
erty be was speculating would have remained in blissful ignor- 
ance of what was going on. But the cards turned the wrong way. 
In a wild endeavor to retrieve, the defaulter became all the more 
inextricably involved in the mire. And still it was only because 
of the failure of these speculative plans that anything would evej 
have been known about them at all. How does this community 
know that the very same thing may not be going on in the case 
of dozens of other estates in our midst, left in the hands of very 
dear friends under precisely similar conditions? And what is 
going to be done about it ? Are our wives and children going to 
run the chances of waking up some fine morning to find them- 
selves converted from princes to paupers, because, forsooth, some 
dear and valued friend of the family had been so unlucky as to 
make a wrong deal in the Board or at the faro table? Is there 
no means of throwing a safeguard around such a state of affairs 
as this? We think there is. We have Fish Commissioners and 
Harbor Commissioners, and any quantity of Commissioners at 
high salaries, whose business is not more important than the pro- 
tection of the estates of our deceased fellow citizens for the benefit 
of their surviving wives and families. Why not establish a 
bureau of inquiry into the condition of estates left in trust, have 
the books and accounts appertaining to them subjected to expert 
official scrutiny, say quarterly, and it is ten to one we would have 
less wailing of widows and orphans, and more care exercised in 
the conservation of trusts. 



ALL the virtue that remains in the Republican party shuddered 
with horror when it seemed likely that Governor Hill of New 
York might depend for his election to the Senate upon the vote 
of a man who was said to have embezzled some money from a 
steamboat company and afterward returned it. If Mr. Hill had 
taken the money himself, and had subsequently been elected 
Chairman of the Democratic National Committee as well as Sena- 
tor, the offense might have been overlooked. But to receive the 
vote of a man of the same kind — the moralists trained by Quay 
never could stand a crime like that. 

THE Chamber of Commerce has passed the Shipping Subsidy 
bill. There being nothing further for Congress to do, a motion 
to adjourn is now in order. 



DEATH OF THE HAWAIIAN KINO. 

Tin death of Ralakeue, Kim- o| the Hawaiian lelandi, in this 
Oily 0D Tuesday last, was In the nature of a surprise to otir 

Although he bed been complaining of poor health for 
soma time, be tree nol supposed to be In any Immediate 'lunger. 
He returned only laet week fro,,, a trip through the Southern 
count lee, where be wee the recipient ol public attentions whirl, he 

was abb' to enjoy with all of hip kOOOltOmed /.est. Only three 
days before his death be attended a banquet and an, installation 
• aremony at one ol the Orders ol this oily. The next day. how- 
ever, he became seriously ill. and the physicians pronounced that 
he had Brlght'a disease in en acute form that left little bopeol ins 
recovery. He soon became unconscious, and, although every- 
thing possible wus done for him, ho quietly passed to his last rest 
on Tuesday afternoon last at the Palace Hotel. The remains 
were embalmed and laid in state in Trinity Episcopal Church 
until their final embarkation for Honolulu on hoard the United 
States' ship of war Charleston, An immense concourse of citizens 
attended the removal ceremonies. There being no telegraphic 
communication with the Hawaiian Islands, nothing will be known 
of the sad bereavement that has overtaken the little kingdom 
until the Charleston is signaled. Honolulu, the capital, it is known 
will be in holiday attire in honor of the King, who was to have 
been given a most cordial and demonstrative welcome home. 
The change from grave to gay will be almost too much for the poor 
natives, who are nothing if not emotional. Honolulu will pre- 
sent a scene never to be forgotten by those who witness it. For- 
tunately the succession to the throne is securely provided for, and 
the ruling Regent, Princess Liliuokalani, will quietly assume 
Queenly authority. The kingdom is at peace with itself and with 
all the world, and is likely to remain so. It has a little grievance 
against the United States that will be adjusted in some way or 
other. The placing of sugar on the free list has taken all the vir- 
tue out of the reciprocity treaty there was in it for the Hawaiians. 
We shall probably not re-impose the duties, but that some way 
will be found to perpetuate the prosperity of the kindly and in- 
teresting people whom the Nation has almost come to look upon 
as its wards, is not to be doubted. It may be that Hawaiian 
sugar will be permitted to share in the bounty system and be put 
on an equal footing with sugar grown in the United States. This 
may well be accomplished without resorting to actual annexation 
of the Islands, which would be opposed by the natives, and 
rightly so. We can do nothing politically for the Island King- 
dom better than to let it alone. Of course, we shall keep a keen 
eye upon it and not permit it to fall into other hands. We shall, 
furthermore, keep it friendly by good deeds, but that is all. 

USELESS COMMISSIONS. 



THE people of California are fairly hag-ridden with a lot of use- 
less and expensive institutions known as commissions, a very 
iaige majority of which have been created by successive Legisla- 
tures for the purpose of making places for political hangers-on 
who demanded some reward for their services. To such a length 
has this vicious system been carried that it has really operated to 
amend Article III. of tbe State Constitution, which divides the 
powers of the government into three departments, the legis- 
lative, executive and judicial, by adding a fourth department, 
that of commissions, which certainly was not contemplated by 
the Constitutional Convention, nor by the people when it ratified 
the work of that body. Every two years these commissions come 
before the Legislature with a plea for increased appropriations, 
either for salaries or operating expenses or both, and session after 
session the money of the people is voted to support these leeches, 
who can show no good or valid reasons for their existence except 
the desire to be paid by the State for doing nothing. It is unneces- 
sary to catalogue these useless and costly bodies. Everybody 
knows them who knows anything of the affairs of the State, and 
can make a list for himself. They accomplish nothing, for there 
is no intention that they should. They prepare verbose reports 
once in two years, which nobody ever reads, and which would do 
no good if they were read, and the rest of their time they devote 
to upholding the political interests of the party to which they 
owe their appointments. The present Legislature ought to go 
through them like a prairie fire through dry grass and wipe them 
out of existence. The party of the majority has taken a pledge 
for economy and reform; now let it keep it, in part, at least, by 
lopping off remorselessly these commissions. The State can save 
hundreds of thousands of dollars a year by the passage of an act 
of twenty or thirty lines abolishing these sinecure positions and 
stopping their continual drafts on the treasury. Politicians will 
not be pleased with the idea, but the people ought to have a show 
once in a while. They have paid for the luxury of a lot of idle 
placemen long enough. They can make a better use of their 
money, and they expect the Legislature now in session to give 
them a chance to do it. The commissions are of no use what- 
ever, and most of them are certainly not ornamental; so the word 
for their abolition should he passed along the line at once, and 
they should be done away with once and for all. 

FROM the number of times Speaker Reed has been called a no- 
gentleman he must begin to feel like one. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




<'[ HAVE been a globe trotter for the last ten years, and no- 

i where on the face of the earth have I met with such perfect 
weather as in San Francisco these last few days." These were words 
I listened to 'on Wednesday last from one of our visiting strangers, 
and I think they will hud an echo in the thoughts of all who read 
these lines and that they will agree that commencing with Sunday 
last it would be impossible to excel in quality the weather given us 
this week. How ihe unfortunate residents of Europe, surrounded 
by snow and ice, and freezing to death with the intense cold of their 
climate this winter, would envy us did they know of the soft, balmy 
air and bright warm sunshine we have enjoyed. 

This week has been uncommonly full of events in San Francisco, 
the grave and the gav being intermingled in no slight degree, the 
death of King Kalakaua at the Palace Hotel, and Mr. Sperry in 
Stockton, causing more than the passing ripple that such occurences 
usually do in society life. . 

San Francisco, in its brief forty odd years of existence, has been 
honored as no other city in the Union. It is here that a reigning 
King and two Queens have first placed their feet upon American soil. 
Queen Emma in 1866, King Kalakaua in 1874, and Queen Kopeolana 
in 18S7; and here King Kalakaua breathed his last on Tuesday, and 
our residents saw, for probably the only time in American history, a 
King's funeral train pass through the streets on Thursday en route 
to the Charleston, which is conveying his remains to Honolulu. 

As anecdotes regarding his Majesty have been in order this week, 
it may, perhaps, not be out of place to mention one of his first public 
appearances in San Francisco in 1875. It was at a concert at Pacific 
Hall, given by Mr. F. Gilder, who had attracted a large crowd by the 
announcement tbat King Kalakaua would attend. After awaiting 
his arrival half an hour the concert began. A King was a novelty in 
those days, and the audience gave notice of their disappointment at 
not seeing him. So, after the second number, Mr. Gilder came upon 
the stage and said he was determined they should not be deprived of 
what they expected, so he had sent a messenger to where the King 
was dining, with orders to " fetch him, dead or alive," which speech 
was received with thunders of applause and much laughter. And 
sure enough it was not very long after when the King and his party 
arrived. He was in evening dress, with a broad blue ribbon across 
his breast, and appeared to be a robust, rather fine looking colored 
man, who was evidently much pleased at the sensation which his en- 
trance created. 

The great disappointment of the week was the loss of the Crocker 
ball, which the death of Mr. Sperry, of course, caused to be set aside. 
There seems to be some fatality of late years attending all the large 
entertainments projected by the Crocker families, the deaths of Mrs. 
Fred Crocker, Mr. Charles Crocker, Mr. Sperry and Mrs. Charles 
Crocker, occurring just in time to prevent their taking place. Possi- 
bly this last disappointment has been the hardest one to bear, so 
much had been said about the long looked for ball, and so much an- 
ticipated. But the greatest sympathy is felt for Mrs. Crocker and her 
sister. Miss Sperry, in their sudden bereavement. 

The list of gay doings this week include dinners, which have been 
very plentiful this season by the bye, lunches, Mrs. Ashe's tea on 
Weanesdav, the church social given by the members of St. Luke's 
congregation on Wednesday, the wrestling tournament at the Olym- 
pic Club on Thursday and Friday evenings, Mrs. Perrin'sball at Pio- 
neer Hall Thursday evening and the fourth of the Friday evening 
cotillions last night. 

The society event of the week was the ball given by Dr. and Mrs. 
Perrin at Pioneer Hall on Thursday evening, and from the absence 
of crush it was one of the most enjoyable gatherings of the season. 
The hall was not elaborately decorated— simply palms and foliage 
were used, which was acknowledged to be a decided relief from the 
mass of ribbons, tulle and other draperies which usually meet the 
eye nowadays at every affair of a festive nature; and then the hall 
was filled with guests, the ladies in beautiful toilettes. The scene 
was a particularly pretty one. The floor, which was covered with 
canvas, was in admirable condition for dancing, which was indulged 
in with avidity, to the witching strains that Ballenberg alone pro- 
duces, and was prolonged until a late hour, only interrupted by the 
summons to the delicious supper, which was served in the lower hall, 
and very thoroughly appreciated. Owing to ill health at the time of 
Mrs. Perrin 's marriage, the wedding was a very quiet one, and since 
then frequent absences from home have prevented any large enter- 
tainments at her hands. Therefore Mrs. Perrin chose her beautiful 
wedding to be her reception dress on Thursday evening, and she 
could not have made a more becoming selection. Her mother, Mrs. 
McMullen, who, with Miss Addie Perrin, assisted in receiving the 
guests, was attired in black velvet, with handsome diamond orna- 
ments. Miss Perrin wore an exquisite creation in pale yellow, 
trimmed with violets. Taken altogether it was a charming party, and 
one which Mrs. Perrin's guests wilt long remember with pleasure. 

Nearly every day and evening next week is already filled, and the 
problem is, how can one take in everything offered them? Among 
other events Miss Younger gives a dance Monday night. On Tuesday 
night the Misses Nightingale will be the hostesses at another. Wed- 
nesday evening the Durbrow wedding and on Thursday Mrs. Hol- 
brookes tea. Next week Charity will also come quite prominently to 
the front again. On Wednesday and Friday nights Julius Caesar will 
be played by some of our best amateurs at the Grand Opera House 
in aid of the Technical School at St. Vincent's Orphanage. San 
Rafael, and an excellent performance is anticipated. On Wednes- 
day, Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings Odd Fellows' Hall will 
be'the sceneof the novel spectacle entitled "The Arabian Nights En- 
tertainment and Merchant's Caravan," arranged by|Mrs. Cummings 
for the benefit of the Home for Incurables, and those who know, say 
it will be something exceedingly well worth seeing. 



NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 



Possibly the subject of most interest to young society at present is 
the Bal Poudre, which will occur on the 6th uf February, it being the 
last of the Friday Night Cotillions before Lent, and will, no doubt, be 
the best attended of this season's series. 

As anticipated, Mrs. Volney Spalding's return has been signalized 
by three charming parties at the Bella Vista already — the cotillion on 
Thursday evening of last week ; the dinner given on Friday in honor 
of her cousin, Miss Brush, and the dinner on Saturday, in honor of 
Mrs. Spalding's return, arranged by some of the young ladies resid- 
ing at the Bella Vista, who wished to show how proficient they had 
become in the art of cooking, and they were most successful. 

A whole batch of engagements and wedding announcements have 
been given to the public this week. That of Miss Rose Donahoe and 
Mr. Montague Hankin is of interest to society at large, in which Miss 
Donahoe has been very much liked since "her arrival in San Fran- 
cisco, as well as to our British residents, whom it more nearly con- 
cerns. Mr. Hankin is a young subject of Queen Victoria, who has 
been in California five or six years, and a good part of that time in 
the office of his prospective father-in-law, Mr. Dennis Donahoe, the 
British Consul. Tbey are the recipients of many congratulations 
and good wishes.* Next in line comes the news of Mrs. 
George Ladd's marriage to Mr. Morton Mitchell, who is a few years 
younger than his bride, who, as Miss Lizzie Miller, will be remem- 
bered as one of those known in society, away back in the sixties, as 
one of " Ralston 's girls," and more recently as the giver of a series of 
lunches prior to her departure for the East. Mrs. Ladd has been 
spending the winter in Washington, and her wedding will, it is said, 
took place last month. 

On Wednesday evening of next week will occur the wedding of 
Miss Carrie Durbrow and Mr. Alfred Holman of Seattle, the cere- 
mony taking place at the residence of the bride's mother on Bush 
stree"t; and on Wednesday of the following week Miss Nina Macon- 
dray will be married to Mr. Perry Eyre, at the country home of her 
mother, Mrs. Percy Selby, at Menlo Park. The marriage of Mi3S 
Linie Ashe and Mr. McLaren is named to take place some time in 
April, probably Easter week. 

Mrs. Bailey-Norris's friends will regret to bear that we are not to 
have the pleasure of seeing her in California at present. Commander 
Norris, having been detached from the Omaha, will remain in Japan- 
ese waters some time longer. 

Although, it was reported that Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon ar- 
rived in New York last Saturday, they were at that date still in San 
Francisco, they having postponed their departure in order to 
take in the " Crocker ball. Mrs. Peter Donahue and Mrs. 
Martin have returned from their long absence in Europe and the 
East. Miss Bissell has also arrived from her trip across the Conti- 
nent. Miss Edith Tavlor is expected home next week from a very 
delightful visit, which' took in all the Eastern cities. Mr. and Mrs. 
Will Ralston, Mrs. and Miss Rising, of Virginia City, have been 
among the recent visitors at the Palace Hotel. 

Miss Jennie Sanderson accompanied Mrs. Frank Newlands wheu 
she left for Washington last week, and will be the guest of Mrs. Hearst 
during the rest of the winter. Mrs. and Miss Dubedat are among 
those who will soon depart from our shores for Europe, where they 
will make an extended visit. Miss Dubedat won fame as one of the 
best swimmers at Santa Cruz during the past summer, and is a 
pianiste of note in society. 

I note the arrival from Honolulu of James Hyde Pratt and Mrs. 
Pratt by the steamer Australia. Mr. Pratthas not visited San Fran- 
cisco since the year 1851, he havingcome here in the early days of 
1849. After leaving he amassed a large fortune at Albany, N. Y. He 
has been visiting the Islands for the past six months, and being re- 
lated to the Hon. Win. Carter, the Minister to Washington and sever- 
al of theofficials to the deceased King Kalakaua, was greatly shocked 
on arriving in this harbor to see on board the U. S. S. Charleston the 
ensign at half-mast for the dead Monarch. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt will, 
during their visit here, stay at Old Oaks, Alameda, the residence of 
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Laver. Mr. James Hyde Pratt is one of the 
few members of the Huguenots who held recently their annual Pio- 
neer banquet in New York in remembrance of early California days. 

Felix. 



THE Crocker annual meeting was held during the week. There 
was no change in the list of Directors, the old Board being re- 
elected for the ensuing year. Mr. W. S. Lyle is the President of 
the Company and N. T. Messer, Secretary. 

Going to build "over the bay?" "Oh, no, I prefer Lakeview, the 
beautiful. 

Smoking J ackets at G. T. Marsh & Co.'s, under Palace Hotel. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIC OOAST, 

23 California St.. S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



FOE SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan. 21, 1891. 



KR.VN< IS< i) NKWS II MM;. 



AUCE KlNGSBl/KY KRS F. M. OOJLEY I 
{By Di Vi 

OLD Callfornl&na, as w«U m* patron* I ihr tawa throughout 
the Untl«d Btatot, have never forg« Htm thai bright litn- 
Kinjtubury, who scintiUtod through a wide expanse ol the 
i theatrical beaten* for over t • M>r hi 

' that invoke? a host ol delightful MM, a charm lingers 

1 around the thought of each one .»f her charaottn, »»<* the woman 
aa well aa the act- and admlra* 

lion. Her admirers, and they were not to be limited to a few 
thousand, are always eager to hear of the sprightly little creature 
who nightly fascinated them npon the boards. It may be a sur- 
prise to them to learn that Alice Kingsbury, who In private life is 
lira. ' lea in this very city ol San Francisco, ami that 

the writer of Ho, for 1"' Land and ol SrersCl Told is Fanchon the 
I and the Feari of Savoy. Only the other day a representa- 
tive of the Kbits Lbttxb met Mr.-, i irho courteously gave 
I the facts of her life for publication in this paper; reference to the 
! dramatic criticism? of the time? give the estimate of her powers. 
is born in Bristol, England, one ol a family of seven, who 
| came to America in three divisions: two of the elder children of 
l the James family had preceded the rest. The mother and live 
i children followed, and later on they were joined by the father, 
' who had remained to settle up bis affairs. One of the sons after- 
' wards came to California in L849, and his adventures among the 
Indians, the Mormons, and upon the Desert where he lay dying 
of thirst, being rescued while fairly at the last gasp — would be of 
all absorbing interest, could Mr. James be induced to give them 
literary expression. 
The family arrived in Cincinnati about 1840-41, in the midst 
' of the great cholera epidemic. Whether it was owing to their 
rugged English health, or to their ignorance of the danger and 
their consequent fearlessness, the family escaped unharmed, 
■ while Alice James, the little girl who later on was to win such 
enthusiastic and appreciative plaudits from delighted audiences 
attended the public schools of Cincinnati, continuing her educa- 
tion at the academy of H. 8. Covington. Before she was more 
than eighteen she had married Horace Kingsbury, a leading jew- 
eler and an accomplished musician. When her first baby was 
only eight months old, while the young mother was still in ber 
teens, she made ber debut as Bianchi. the Italian wife in the pow- 
erful drama Fazio, which was written by the Rev. Dr. Milman, a 
proi.i.nent clergyman. This drama won him fame, and at the 
same time cost him bis pulpit, for at the time he wrote people 
could not forgive a minister for writing a play, much less a great 
one. 

Alice Kingsbury received her first inspiration to become an ac- 
tress from a letter, which came to her after a Sunday School ex- 
hibition, at which she spoke " The Lay of the Madman," a power- 
ful and dramatic piece. The letter praised her talent, and advised 
her strongly to make the stage her profession. It was not, how- 
ever, until after marriage that she was able to follow the dictates 
of her ambition. Her father, a stern old Quaker, would never have 
given his consent, nor did his daughter considerit best to attempt 
to argue with him on the subject. By her marriage, however, the 
little lady was free to decide such questions for herself. Strange 
as it may seem, on the night of ber debut her father, with the 
keenest interest, watched the progress of the play from a stage 
box, and enjoyed theimmense success which his daughter at once 
made. 

The dibut was made at the Old National Theatre, also known 
at the old Drury Theatre, and its boards had resounded to the 
tragic tread of the Booths, of the great Logan, father of his no 
less eminent daughter, Eliza Logan, and had been the scene of 
the triumphs of Julia Dean Hayne. 

The position was a trying one for the young debutante. She 
was not buoyed up by the confidence of her friends, her family 
were fearful of her failure, and, with this atmosphere of appre- 
hensiveness to surround her, she bravely drank deep draughts of 
inspiration from her ambition and her confidence in her own 
powers. Her only encouraging friend at the critical moment was 
the old stage manager who studied her from the wings, nodding 
approval, and meeting her as she came off the stage each time, 
with his arms folded in Napoleonic attitude across his breast, his 
head bent low, and his gruff tones saying: » Reserve your voice 
for the third act." That night decided the future of the aspirant 
for dramatic honors. The curtain fell on thunders of applause, 
and the young actress was called before the curtain in a manner 
that left no possibility of doubt concerning her success. This 
impression was confirmed by the verdict of the critics. All the 
training that Alice Kingsbury ever received was the elocution les- 
sons which she took from Zackeus, a Greek elocutionist, and, be- 
fore her debut, be said; " Well, you've hit me. I don't know bow 
it will be with the audience." Evidently the audience had been 
bit, too, for Alice Kingsbury continued to create a sensation. She 
played Julia in The Hunchback, and Pauline in The Lady of 
Lyons. It is a noteworthy fact that every part played by Alice 
Kingsbury was her own conception of the character, for never, 
until after she had played it, did she see any other actress in the 
same part. 



Mason at t! rial, she went traveling 

through Ohio null tha | ..-\ying Leading bnslnsss. This 

■■ ment was follow ■ 

lain were MVSra] playi written by herself. OOS "f Hm-iii. Thr 

f.ittir i; iv as played with prolonged ■oocets, In both Now 

York and Canada. Hoi ; to California was the result of a 

romanl Whits n atchlng -.\ Fourth .if 

July procession In Madison, Wisconsin, ins tnsl a gontloman 
fr.»m California who knew ber brother, the in er from whom the 

family had not heard f«>r many years. Alice Kingsbury v. 

termtned to corns oni here and sec biro, and Immediate)} after* 
ward mads an engage men I In Sew York with John Be ft on, Tom 

Maguire's manager, for a season >>f t« p n night* at the old 

Ington street Theatre, In 1800. These ten nights were Immensely 
profitable, as may be judged from the figures. After the ex- 
penses were all paid, the star and Magnire divided the profits, 

which amounted to -vino a night. With the high premium then 
brought by gold, Alice Kingsbury received as her share nearly 
$2,200. 

A stay of eight, months resulted In continual appearances. 
Among those who supported Alice Kingsbury in her California 
engagements were John McCullough, Mrs. Judah, Mrs. Jackson 
and Kate Denin, who is now connected with one of the great 
New York companies, playing queens, duchesses, and dignified old 
ladies with all her old time succcess. Californians have a very 
warm regard for Kate Denin. 

During her California engagements, Alice Kingsbury played, 
besides her own plays, Fanchon, Pearl of Savoy, Poreretta and the 
Indian Girl in the Child of the Str angler. In the latter she fenced 
with a man of immense stature, and nightly this scene was re- 
ceived with a waving of handkerchiefs, three cheers and a tiger. 
Her first husband died some years ago. Later she returned East. 
There she married Col. F. M. Cooley, whose sudden demise last 
November was a great shock to his friends and called forth reso- 
lutions of respect from the Loyal Legion, of which be was an 
honored member of the first class. Previous to her second mar- 
riage she left the stage. About fifteen years ago she played a 
season at the Grand Opera House in San Francisco, in which she 
was supported by Annie Pixley, Katie Maybew, Crane and Jas. 
O'Neil. When she first played Fanchon she had McKee Rankin 
in her company. 

Three years ago she played an engagement of three weeks in 
Oakland, portraying all ber old characters. Her talents are ver- 
satile. She inherits an ability to paint in oils, model in clay and 
to carve, from her mother, who, and her father, is yet alive. 
She is a writer of merit, having contributed to the local press for 
years. "The Grumphy Papers," which appeared in the Sunday 
edition of a San Francisco daily, were from her pen. Her latest 
effort is in the line of a novel, entitled " Asaph," dedicated to 
Mrs. E. B. Crocker of Sacramento. 



All things that are, are with more spirit chased by mankind than 
enjoyed, but this does not apply when" one has been chasing all over 
town and been unsuccessful in finding a suitable hat, eventually to 
discover just what is becoming to your own style of beauty at the es- 
tablishment of White, the hatter, 614 Commercial street. 



The defects of the understanding, like those of the face, grow 
worse as we grow old, but none around these parts, even those who 
have arrived at the allotted span of three score and ten, have been 
found so deficient in understanding, as not to own that the best house 
to purchase wearing apparel is J. M. Litchfield & Co., 12 Post street. 

Rare Curios— Japanese works of art— at Marsh's, under Palace 
Hotel. 




EUGENIE FACE POWDER. 






Mrs. GRAHA'MS Eugenie Face Powder is deli- 
cate, soft, impalpable, invisible, ^oes not rub off, 
and is as harmless as a rose leaf placed against the 
cheek. In three shades— Cream-white, Flesh, and 
a very pretty new Brunette shade. Price 50 cents. 

All druggists keep it, or will order it for their 
I customers. Sent by mail on receipt of postal note 
or stamps. 

Mrs. GRAHAM, " Beauty Doctor," 103 Post St., 
treats Ladies for all blemises or defects of face or 
figure. Superfluous hair removed by electrolysis 



DRY MONOPOLE, 

(EXTRA) and 

MONOPOLE Club Dry (Brut) 

GHAMPAG1TES 
HEIDSIECK & GO., Reims. 

Established 1785. 



H. H. VEUVE, Pacific Coast Agent, 

124 SANSOMB STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




"We Obey no Wand taut Pleasure's.' 



THE greatest of recent opera seasons ends this evening at 
the Grand Opera House with a final production of Tannhauser, 
probably the distinctive success of the season and the one for 
which theJuch Company's visit will be best remembered. Among 
these successes, Die Walhure, the first of Wagner's great tretralogy 
to be given a San Francisco hearing, and for which San Francisco 
was wrought up to a pitch of almost unbearable impatience and 
excitement, will not be numbered, It was well that we should 
hear it, though the effect may be chiefly a longing to hear and see 
it. See it, we probably never shall here, unless in the far future 
we look down (or up) on a San Francisco theatre fitted with the 
full accessories for Wagnerian opera. After Die Walkure at the 
Grand Opera House, we no longer wonder that Wagner insisted 
on having a theatre built purposely for its production. 

We may yet have one here. A syndicate of our millionaires 
looking for a permanent investment without interest by which to 
reduce their surplus, may, under a sudden inspiration of public 
spirit, build a Wagnerian opera house (with a property room 
filled with real storm, fog, hail, thunder and lightning, mountain 
peaks, and other accessories, including a stable of Walkyrian steeds 
with "thundering manes," but warranted not to throw and tram- 
ple on the mortal chorus Walkyrie, for the free occupation of any 
company adequate to sing and play the great musik dramas of the 
genius-mad composer. 

* * * 

The orchestral music, with its spirit-stirring depths, its wild, 
somber suggestion, and its aimost supernatural power over the 
imagination, carried the opera for the few whose imagination 
could bear the strain of ignoring the stage and its occupants. 
Occasionally, however, these came with a sudden bound almost 
to the concert pitch of the requirements. A notable example 
was the appearance of Madame Januschowsky on the " lightning- 
cleft" peak, as Brunhilde, her fiery mien and ringing, trumpet- 
like tones realizing the ideal of the warrior goddess, and taking 
away for the moment the all-pervading sense of unreality. 
Madame Januschowsky's Brunhilde stamps her as a great dra- 
matic artist, as well as one of the great singers of the present 
musical world. 

* * # 

One of the results of the opera season jnst past is that we are 
all " Vawgnerized" (although some of us still pronounce it with a 
W), and will hereafter read the funny men's irreverent references 
to cooper-shops and boiler factories with pitying contempt. The 
spirit of Wagner is, in fact, now so rife among us that the few 
who have from the first, through evil report and good report, 
stood firm by the music of the future, incurring thereby the 
charge of either affectation or lunacy, are inclined to feel resent- 
fully jealous of the zeal of the new converts, and to regard them 
as trespassers on a pre-empted claim. The while the great com- 
poser smiles from the serene heights of the Walhalla to see even 
the outer barbarian hordes by the Golden Gate coming under the 
regenerating influence of his "cult." 

* # * 

Natural Gas, at the Bush-street Theatre, is announced as 
" funnier than ever," and the facts justify the announcement. 
The comedy business of Donnelly and Girard is of a distinctively 
original character, and both clever and amusing. There is not a 
dull moment in Natural Gas. In nothing is the " originality " of 
the two principals more strikingly manifest than in their sur- 
rounding themselves with so clever and capable a company. 
Each specialty is good enough of its kind to be a leading feature 
in the average farce-comedy. Mr. Girard seems more than ever 
like a limpet in the gift of apparantly sticking to walls and other 
objects, including his partner, and his imitation of the "gooda 
monk " is as quaintly remarkable a piece of mimicry as ever. 
Millie Price is lively, and a graceful dancer as well as a kicker. 
Miss Annie Mack Berlein throws a true spirit of humor and a 
fine brogue into the part of Kitty Maloni, and the entire company 
is so good as to make particularization needless. The piece is 
full of originality and fun, and the people have one and all caught 
the spirit of it. Much of the music and many of the songs are 
the work of Richard Stahl, a former Tivoli musical director. 

The long-expected Miss McGinty is at the California, and the 
California is finding hard work to seat all the people who flock to 
see it. That the piece as a coherent production does not quite 
come up to expectation, was {to speak paradoxically) to be ex- 
pected. The name of Charley Reed, as originator of a funny 
piece, opens up to the San Franciscan fancy such a vista of fun 
and humor as is very difficult to realize. There is little coherence 
and no great amount of fun in the piece ; but there is a good deal 
of the latter quality in the people, with some other qualifications 
to help out. Charley Reed's new songs and recitations are full of 
the old-time " inspired idiocy " that no one else could keep an au- 



dience convulsed #ith, and it is no small satisfaction to his numer- 
ous enthusiastic admirers that he comes back to us always the 
same "Charley Reed" in the freedom from self-assertion and the 
evident desire to please, as in the name, which has not developed 
after the fashion of the ordinary translated minstrel into " Mr. 
Charles Reed." The advertisements might have announced "Fay 
Templeton, as a lady," for in her acting as well as her dress as 
Miss McGinty, she is a charmingly decorous, if somewhat lively, 
woman. Her long skirts become her well ; and, in truth, the gen- 
eral absence of the lavish personal display usually inseparable 
from similar productions, is highly refreshing. MissTempleton's 
Carmencita dance in a costume of flaming orange silk and black 
lace, makes a glowing and fascinating picture worthy to be framed 
in memory with those of Rosina Vokes and Alma Stuart Stanley. 
Dan Daly, the office boy, Useless, is so queerly clever, as almost 
to outrank the two stars. There is, no doubt, much in Miss Mc- 
Ginty as a play which may be legitimate subject for caviling; but 
in farce-comedy one may paraphrase Holmes' lines about eyes — 
" No matter; if a play can draw 
What more have plays to do? " 

Beacon lights are sometimes kindled to direct the uncertain 
wayfarer, sometimes as a signal of danger ahead. The Beacon 
Lights at the Alcazar must be of the latter description. It is care- 
fully announced that the piece was thoroughly tested in the 
country before being brought out here. This " trying it on a 
dog " is occasionally liable to misfits. The dog may survive and 
hobble off on three legs, with his tail tucked under him, after 
swallowing what would kill the average human. Perhaps the 
play might not be so prosy and dreary with a good company; 
but, then, it is only fair to admit that the company might not 
seem so dreadfully dreadful in a good play. Which is cause and 
which effect will never be known, probably, in this world. But 
as Mr. Grismer is responsible for both, he should give the matter 
early attention. Miss Da vies plays a good-hearted tomboy 
charmingly, as she does everything, and Scott Cooper is not bad 
as Col. Clay Calhoun, an unreconstructed Confederate. " Comrade 
Grismer" works his G. A. R. business, in season and out of sea- 
son, for all it is worth, and Beacon Lights, as " re-written by J. R. 
Grismer," of course gives him the usual chance as the impassive 
and impossible army Captain, before whose prowess everything 
and everybody go down, for the patent, and as patently sole, 
reason that it is set down in the stage business that they shall. Mr. 
Grismer and his talented wife (perhaps one should say " on ac- 
count of his talented wife ") are popular in the country, an 1 un- 
doubtedly also with a certain clientele in the city. But while San 
Francisco flouts the brightest star if he conies with a poor com- 
pany, she is hardly going to approve a feebler light with the 
same accompaniment. Mr. Grismer has, doubtless, other plays, 
and he ought to bring them out early. They might be better, 
and could hardly be worse. If he has another company about 
him, he should bring that out at the same time. 
# # * 

The first of a series of " Saturday Popular Concerts " was given 
by Mrs. Carmichael-Carr and Mr. Sigmund Beel last Saturday at 
Irving Hall. As the inception of a movement calculated to in- 
struct as well as entertain the San Francisco public, this concert 
merits special notice. The programme was not only purely class- 
ical, but so well chosen as to allure even the uncultured ear toward 
the enjoyment of high-class music, and was rendered with such 
rare conscientiousness as to form a lesson to even professional 
players. Mrs. Carr's piano accompaniments display, in a marked 
degree, the true artistic sympathy which makes them less an ad- 
junct to the solo performance than apart of an harmonious whole. 
The pianist's brilliant and forcible work also formed a potent 
factor in the pronounced success of the final number of the con- 
cert, a Beethoven quartette for piano and strings. The Saint-Saens 
number on Mr. Beel's violin called out an encore, which was re- 
warded by one of the gems of the concert. Schumann's Abendlied, 
originally written for the piano for four hands and arranged for 
the violin by Joachim, was so perfectly rendered as to merit all 
praise. Mr. Beel's strongly artistic temperament and musical in- 
dividuality did not once tempt him into the sacrilege of taking the 
slightest liberty with the composer's work, the tempo being 
strictly adhered to throughout with pious exactitude. Such play- 
ing by artists so well known is, as before said, a lesson to musi- 
cians in an important particular. Messrs. Heine and Schmidt ren- 
dered effective assistance with 'cello and viola, and Donald de Vere 
Graham's ballad singing made a charming diversion in a delight- 
ful programme. The Saturday "pops" are destined to become a 
success if the enthusia'stic and unamimous indorsement of those 
present at the first can be taken as a criterion, and it has been al- 
ready suggested that a second series be arranged. The managers 
were slightly disappointed at one feature of the very flattering 
patronage accorded. While all the reserved seats — the dollar seats — 
were taken, scarcely any of the half-dollar unreserved places were 
filled. The name "popular" applies rather to the price which 
brings these concerts within reach of all music-lovers than to the 
character of the music, which is of the highest class. It is the 
strong desire of the managers to see the fifty-cent seats all taken, 
though the financial result to themselves may be less solid. When 
the people begin to understand that a reserved seat at the Satur- 



Jan. 24, 1891. 



3AN FRANCIS* NEWS I BTTKR 



d»y •• popular " it not essential, many true muiirlovpr* will find 
tfaeruselves in the unwonted injojmenl of a real musical privfla^i 
for a comparatively iritlitift outlay. 
• • • 

The roller skating at the Oljmpian Club Kink is increasing in 
popularity. Several gentlemen «•( fifty ami upward have Mnrtr.i 
in lo learn. In the belief that the cx«t. -. cures rheumatism. l!n\ 
get a few bruises bnt they say the rheumatism goes, ami It is much 
more agreeable tban Ibc "lytup cure." 

The Tivoli Opera House has been doing well with Widow O'Brien, 
the lively play being touched np with fresh interest by a new olio, 
Including an exhibition of •■ science'* between the colored cham- 
pion, Peter Jackson, and Joe Bowers. 

Alex Comstock, who. as business manager of the New York 
Academy of Music, is in a position to know, declares : "As in 
otln-r professions, the ' woman' in theatricals is rapidly advancing 
to a sphere of prominence, excelling the * man' in point of wealth 
accumulation and ability to retain the dollars. In a great many 
instances, and in some of the largest cities, the opera houses are 
either managed directly or controlled by women, and many of the 
theatrical organizations now on the road have a manageress in- 
stead ot a manager. It seems odd enough, but it is nevertheless 
true, that there is not a half dozen managers in the whole pro- 
fession worth a half million dollars, yet there are certainly five 
women who manage their own companies who can boast of 
wealth even exceeding this amount, namely: Lotta, Sarah Bern- 
hardt, Lily Langtry, Modjeska, and the late Emma Abbott." 

The reliability of the telegraphic ticker in recording theatrical 
successes, may be gathered from the following dispatch, sent to 
the New York Mirror on the occasion of a recent " production " 
at the Grand Opera House, San Francisco: "Geo. Ulmer opened 
in Thr Volunteer — hundreds turned away ; a tremendous success in 
every particular." (!!!) 

Lotta will appear at the Baldwin Monday, January 26th, in 
Fred Marsden's comedy, Muzetlc. Ina, Lotta's latest success, will 
fill the second week. Her company includes several already 
favorites here, and others as well known by repute. Among 
them are Walter Allen (the conspicuous success of the Abbott 
production of The Yeoman of the Guard), Will 8. Rising, and others. 

It is said that the lions in Nero receive $800 a week each. These 
lion reports of actors' salaries seem to have reached a climax. 

The Bush-street Theatre has a coming attraction in Patti Rosa, 
who will produce Fred Marsden's Imp, revised for Miss Rosa by 
Clay Greene. Her company includes the favorite young come- 
dian, George Boniface, Jr. 

KINGS DAUGHTERS HOME FOR INCURABLES. 



THE enterprising, wide-awake, kind-hearted King's Daughters 
of California have made a grand start in the direction of es- 
tablishing in San Francisco one of the most needed charities 
among mortals, viz., a " Home for Incurables." To be "pro- 
nounced " incurable after a long siege of illness, is of itself enough 
to drive the last spark of life's best beam from one's heart; but 
then, after ninety days, to be "discharged " because one is incur- 
able, and have no place but charity's door to find care and neces- 
sities, is indeed more than good people should allow any fellow 
mortal to bear. But alas! there are hundreds in this city alone 
who have been thus « pronounced " and " discharged." Many of 
these are people of refined tastes and cultured minds, whose suf- 
ferings are intolerable. And these fair Daughters of the King, com- 
ing from all the different churches, are founding & home for the in- 
curables! Of course they will succeed, for "when woman wills, she 
wills, and you may depend on it," and now as a means to the end 
of raising money for this grand work, an entertainment, lasting 
four nights, beginning next Wednesday, January 28th, will be 
given at Odd Fellows' Hall, composed and directed by the well- 
known Mrs. Ella Sterling Cummings, of a character so grotesque 
and unique as to be just the place to laugh away one's worry and 
care. Booths around the hall will represent characteristics of 
the "Arabian Nights Entertainment," such as " Sinbad the 
Sailor " and his menagerie of human elephants, camels, giraffes, 
and six monkeys from the Olympic Club; "The Magic Mirror," 
where any bachelor or maiden can see their " ane thrue love;" 
The " Land of White Camphor," where pomegranite seeds and 
sherbet can only be found by touch of the magic wand of the 
genie, Mr. George Bromley, of the Bohemian Club; a cave where 
those " forty thieves " have been discovered, and " Marouf, the 
hen-pecked husband," whose wife's tongue was too long to ever 
rest, until the King's Daughters imported their wonderful "tongue 
tyers," which they will sell for the benefit of other hen-pecked 
husbands. There'll be " Joudar and his enchanted saddle-bags," 
where sweet-meats will be brought forth by the genii upon golden 
plates. " Blue Beard," his dead wives, and Fatima will have 
their live part in making you laugh. For this grand cause and 
such an entertainment, the ladies have placed their price of ad- 
mission too low; ?1 a ticket would be cheap, but they only ask 
fifty cents, and family or season tickets only $1.50. 

Mrs. Julia Melville-Snyder by her method of mechanical voice 
training, makes her pupils proficient in articulation, elocution and 
dramatic vocalization. Studio, 138 McAllister street. 



BALDWIN THEATRE-EXTRA. 

M«. Al. BiTMAH. Um, • r | Mn Amm Bonn.., Manager 

l«y. J.iin.rjr Itth. Ih.' Tlirnlrr o-lll b* .1, .».-.! an. I the 

Kv»> Jim i. r»u. I Opera I', rdirnnuroa flxeu In lh.' iirau.1 Opon II 

Mon.lay. January »lh. {«..». Untfanaj FkTOrlM, LOTTA. 

•npnortcd bj an (ImiMially sir..u« Cornell) Company. 

■■■ ■KK-M.ui.lay. I u. -..lay. W.-.li„-».l«y, ami Saturday Mnlli 

The!.: 

MUSETTE I 
Thursday, Prldn nn.i Saturday- Pint Mom here. PAWN-TICKET No. HO. 
Seal, ready rhureday, Jumarj i 

.. Febru ary j.l. Lotta - . Laleil Soma, INA. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre In tho World. 
Mr. alHayman, Leasee and Proprietor | M». Habby Mann. Manager 

The Great Laughing Festival. Thl« Kvenlng. Every Evening. Saturday 
HatiDee. 

RUSSELL'S COMEDIANS. Including Pay Tkhpi.eton aud CHABI.EY 
Rebd. Iu the Latent Musical Prollc, 

MISS MoGINTY ! 
(Of the Comedie Fnincaise.) 
Scats Now Selling. 



NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Lkavitt. Lessee aud Proprietor | J. J. Gottlob Manager 

Started Monday, Langhiug Yet! Everybody Delighted with Donnelly 
aud G.rahd, and their Clever Company, in 

NATURAL GAS IN A NEW METER I 

Matinee T o-Day at 2. Eveniugs at 8;16. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors aud Managers 

Second Week, and a Great Success. 

THE WIDOW O'BRIEN I 

Grand Olio, introducing Peter Jackson. Colored Heavy-Weight Cham- 
pion, aud Joe Bowers, iu a Scientific Exhibition. New Specialties! 
Popular Prices . ..2fto. and 5 0o. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Under the Personal Direction of Mr. Al Hayman. 

Baldwin Theatre Closed During the Week. 
Last Nights, and Saturday Matinee, of the Grand Opera Season. 

EMMA JUCH GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY I 

Seats on sale during the day at the Baldwin box-office. Plenty of First- 
class Seats for Everybody. All Baldwin Theatre seats must be exchanged 
at Baldwin box-office. 

Saturday— Popular Matiuee, 25c, 50c, 75c aud $1— CARMEN. 

Saturday Night— Grand Farewell— TANNHAUSER. 

Emma Joch Sings Every Night. 

Prices—?!, $1.50, $2. Gallery, 50 cents. 

B^" Baldwin Theatre— Monday, January 26th, Lotta In MUSETTE. 

Seats Now Ready. 

ODD FELLOWS' HALL. 



"Arabian Nights" Entertainment, 

-AND 

MERCHANTS' CARAVAN, 

ZtTOTTIR. IiriQ-HTS, 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, beginning January 28th, 

FOR THE 

KING'S DAUGHTERS HOME FOR INCURABLES. 



Novel Scenic Display. Gorgeous Costumes. Clever, Amusing, Enter- 
taining. Composed and directed by Mrs. ELLA STERLING CUMMINGS. 

Catchy Music, composed for occasion, by Prof. VHAKLES TKOYIvK. 

Talented Artists from Olympic and Bohemian Clubs. Mr. George Bromley 
among the number. Admission— 50 cents. Season Tickets, ?1.50. 

THE OLYMPIAN CLUB ROLLER SKATING RINK, 

(Entire Mechanics' Pavilion). 

Great International Six-Day Race on Roller Skates, now in progress, each 
day, from 4 to 10 P. M., Including Sunday. Ends Monday, January 2*ith. 

Admission at all times, 25 cents. Rink open continuously, 2 to 11 p. m. 

B3^ m Geueral Skating, both on the racing track and in the center of the 
rink from 2 to 4. From 4 o'clock and until 11, geueral skating In the 
center. After 10 o'clock, all fast skaters who choose, may indulge in go as- 
you-please skating on the racing track. 



Exhibition of the Paintings 

OF THE 

CELEBRATED PAINTER, PROF. I. I. REINHARDT, 
Court Painter of the Duke of Sachsen-Coburg-Uotlia, 

FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY, AT THE 

■history bttix-iDxostCt, 

Market Street, Fifth Floor, 
gy- Between the hours of 10 a. m and 5 p. m. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




NEWS LETTER. 

4 - 



Jan. 24, 1891. 



THE friends of "Teddy" Halden have no sooner offered their 
"congratulations and good wishes" than they discover that 
they must have made a mistake somehow, and should possibly 
have otfered condolence instead. Congratulations under the cir- 
cumstances—as matters in his private family affairs seem to be 
developing — may have the tinge of irony. Poor Halden; he has 
gone his little way in clubdom, enjoying life in all its pleasurable 
phases without disagreeable notoriety only to " put his foot in 
it," matrimonially. Mr. Herold is determined to be the father of 
his own daughter, while Mrs. Halden is "just as determined that 
he shall not," to use the language of our plain comedian, Charley 
Reed. And since the case will be tried «« behind closed doors," 
our curiosity will not be gratified with all the details, but enough 
of it will get about to furnish the lovers of gossip with their de- 
lightful morsels. If Teddy Halden realized what the outcome of 
his matrimonial venture would involve, we must say he is a man 
of iron nerve, and more a lover than a diplomat. 
» » » 

News comes from El Paso of the arrival there of George Cbees- 
man, who has been visiting his relatives in 'Frisco for the past 
few months. Mr. Cheesman and his partner, Mr. Fred Otis, own 
large cattle ranches out there, and no end of acres of land. Mr. 
Cheesman will return in the spring. 

* # # 

The " Dude's Lament " will be sung about Clubdom, when they 
are given to understand that airy, fetching Fay Templeton is 
accompanied on this trip by her husband, and that means pro- 
priety and no petit soupers. » 

* # # 

We hear that Mr. Joseph Redding has been composing more 
music. What a genius this man is, to be sure! His face indi- 
cates that, before one has heard him play or speak. But after- 
wards — after one has listened to his compositions and improvis- 
itrations, they must confess that he is a born artist. His 
after-dinner speeches are equally original and clever, all of which 
makes him popular with men, as well as with women. 

* * # 

Mr. Fewclothes Unger has returned to his feathered nest at Sac- 
ramento. He'd better remain there. We do not need him at 
present; not at least while the Earl of Stokes is with us. 

* * * 

How well Beylard is looking after his long sojourn abroad. 
There is nothing like foreign travel to brush a man up a bit. 

The members of the "duck club" make their weekly trips to 
the marshes, no matter what the weather or the temptations the 
city offers. Some of our best fellows belong to this club, and they 
always report "no end of good sport." 

* # # 

An old 'Frisco favorite, Mr. Warrener, has returned to town for 
a brief visit. He is seeing the sights with his friend, Howell Os- 
born. 

* * * 

Charley Baldwin has also returned, as handsome and dibonnaire 
as ever. We have not, as yet, learned the date fixed for his mar- 
riage ; he looks as though he were enjoying his last days of bach- 
elorhood, and why not, to be sure, being a man of moderation. 
For one who has been so flattered and favored by women, Charley 
Baldwin is absolutely unspoiled, and is altogether a charming 
man, and one immensely popular with men, as well. 

All society was out in its best clothes Monday night at the 
California. It was like an opera night, and the old favorites got 
a regular ovation as they appeared. All the dudes from dudedom, 
and all the bloods of clubdom, and half the swells in swelldom were 
out in force. Then there were the beau monde, demi-monde and 
tout le monde, and no end of French bcmnets and spike-tail coats. 
Frank Johnson was mashing pretty little Hanlou, and Tom 
Meagher had eyes for tall, graceful Miss Johnstone, and, by jove, 
she is a beauty. Every masher in the house took all the smiles of 
the fair ones for himself individually — such is the vanity of man — 
but when Fay, the only Fay, appeared in that Spanish costume 
and sang and danced herself into the hearts of all the men and 
half the women, there was a quiet gnashing of teeth among some 

of the fellows, who declared it was a d d shame that such a 

"devilish fine woman should be encumbered with a husband." 
" It's quite impolitic and unprofessional," drawled G. " Yes," 
replied W, " and Osborn is so jealous and all that, that a fellow is 
afraid of his life to make any advances." " What fools these mor- 
tals be," as if an actress should be deprived of her domestic life. 
When the curtain drops on the last scene, the actor belongs to 
himself. 

# # » 

"The lady of the latch-key" is the soubriquet given the pretty 
girl who wielded one with such success for so long a time. We 
wonder if hubby will allow it, too, under the new regime. 



Dimruock is not so quiet as when last heard from ; the barometer 
is rising slowly but surely. Lay low, old man. Fizz and stewed 
prunes don't go together. Where was Healey when the maids 
went out. Where! why right there! ! 1 ! ! 

# * # 

How popular a certain O'Farrell street ratisserie is, with all sorts 
and conditions of men and women. Oh, what risks a certain 
two married women are taking, and if their husbands "catch on," 
why there will be a gun, two dead dudes and a scandal. 

» # » 

If the genial proprietor of the Montgomery street hostelry, who 
is so devoted to the welfare of his guests, would have an eye to 
those animated antiques who are stationed, respectively, at the 
< Ladies' Entrance ' and the door of the parlor, it plight result ben- 
eficially for the outside public. They have been there since the 
year one, and it must be influence that enables them to retain 
their posts, as efficiency in discharging their duties is out of the 
question. The fossil at the entrance is there, presumably, to open 
the heavy door, and, if one waits till he finishes read'ng the paper 
or wakes from his nap, he will, eventually, open it. Once in, the 
visitor next encounters that embodiment of assurance and lazi- 
ness, who condescends to take one's card, carries it into the hall, 
and stands there in full view, while he leisurely adjusts his glasses 
and then deciphers the name. Every woman who goes in and out 
of the house will thank the Colonel at the first sign of any im- 
provement on these two antediluvians. 

# • * 

Anent hotels, what's the matter with the California. The tide 
that rushed in from the Occidental, has receded, they say, and is 
flowing back to its original place. Inability to sleep, on account 
of the noises, is one reason given. It seems a pity that so per- 
fectly an appointed and delightful an establishment should not be 
a success in every particular. Messieurs les proprietaires, come to 
the front and set things in order. 

# * # 

The extra swell from New York, yclept Stokes, has signified 
his intention of continuing his mild form of entertainment be 
gun last week in a " tea " in honor of Mrs. Fred. Sharon, where 
a few of her relations were the guests invited to meet her. 
No wonder gossip should immediately decry such an innovation 
in society's ranks. " It is bad enough, goodness knows," says a 
pretty girl, » when one of the big houses, so well adapted for a 
ball, is thrown open for a horrid old tea, but if men are going in 
for that style of doing the civil, why. I give up, that's all." 
Possibly it does not strike this young damsel that a tea is the 
most delightful {to the giver) mode of wiping off social indebted- 
ness at a small cost. What is required? Merely light refresh- 
ments, a string band, and flowers. Voila tout! 

* # * 

There is a rumor that the magnificent Stokes is pondering the 
arrangement of a smoking concert at his " unique rooms." As 
several of our fashionable dames and demoiselles have lately taken 
up the Anglo-Gotham fad of cigarette smoking, no doubt the 
swim will be eager to attend. Anything for novelty. All that 
is required is a mind and purse daring and capable of suggesting, 
and the lengths that society will go cannot be estimated — in print. 

* # * 

The bitter parting of the recently wedded pair, occasioned by 
the Indian outbreak, will soon be a thing of the past, now that 
the cruel war is over. But society will be called npon to say 
good-bye to both, it is feared, as the rumor goes that the First In- 
fantry will not return here, but have a change of quarters, which 
news, if true, will deprive us of a very charming couple in Lieu- 
tenant Winn and his popular wife. 

# # # 

The beautiful Mrs. Will Crocker has distanced all competitors 
this season, and is avowedly the leader of the fashionable set. 
Not alone have her toilettes been the most chic, but she herself is 
possessed of beauty and grace, and, what is a rare adjunct in the 
wife of a millionaire, of charitable impulses and acts. She is, 
moreover, a lady whom the breath of scandal has never touched, 
and her husband has the satisfaction of feeling that he plucked 
the bud in its freshest bloom, ere yet another's hand had essayed 
to bend or break the blossom. 

# # # 

Jimmy, the capitalist's son, is a smart boy, and much sought 
after by the girls. He is muchly addicted to their society, also, 
but apparently is loth to tie himself down to one, yet awhile. 
Nevertheless, a certain young lady, who poses for intellect, has 
had, as she and her friends have thought, the inside track in the 
race for the young man's affections and coin. So her feelings may 
be better imagined than described, when she saw him out buggy- 
riding last week with another girl. Jimmy, my dear friend, take 

another route next time you go out. Remember Miss 's sworn 

friend now dwells on the thoroughfare to the park, and the two 
girls are often at the window to look at the passers by. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 



Jan. 84, 1891 



- \\ n; \\. !>< \]\\ -MM RR, 



THE RAILROADS. 

TH1 Ai.i.-i:. 1'Kroniclr. r« | Hlf WwUro traffio 
■grMtovnt, njs: ■■ i b I iha tmiigvmcnl rot to 

tblidhmcni aii<1 •<>tttinuanofl "f uniform 
and rf»aon»(»lr rates, and the insuring to each Inn- ■ it* fair lb Are 
of the competitive trath. .* Five I on ■ ■ to have the 

; power, nibjeel to appeal t<> the Board) to make an 

equitable division ol the oompetlln e l raffle ■ Dpon inch baala and 
in Boofa lawful manner as they deem advisable.' There la to be no 
1 pool, but simply an agreement \<> lei the Ootntni as toners, on the 
application of a <ii*!«ati!<lied party, decide by a unanimous vote 
what traffic each road ought to have, and then to abide bj such 
on; ^r. if an appeal be taken, to be governed by tin- decis- 
ion ol the Advisory Board. We think that the conciliatory <lis- 
poslUon shown ni the meeting is a guarantee that the compact 
will be carried oot according t" Its spirit. If it is, then highly 
beneficial results are certain to follow. 1 ' 

BESIDES the Alton, the only other important roads not in the 
agreement, as already announced, are the Chicago, St. Panl 
and Kansas City, and the Kansas ' 'ity, Fort Scott and Memphis. 
. The former may cause trouble if it is not liberally rewarded for 
j good behavior, but the other roads claim that it can gain nothing 
by remaining out of the association. If it should resort to rate- 
cutting for the purpose of diverting an undue proportion of the 
traffic to its lines, the policy of the association will be to appoint 
one member to meet the disturber on its own ground, and carry 
on the light until it is ready to declare a truce. The only thing 
that gives any hope of permanency to the new association is the 
■ provision for a division of traffic. Without that none of the man- 
| agers would have any confidence in the scheuie, and unless that 
particular feature of it, which is still an experiment, proves suc- 
cessful, tbey say the agreement will not last six months. 

SENATOR KKY'S Select Committee on Pacific Railroads was 
called together last week in order to hear further arguments 
upon the hill already reported from the committee to secure the 
repayment of the Government indebtedness of the Union and 
Central Pacific Railroad Companies. The Union Pacific Railroad 
Company was represented by Jeremiah Wilson, who said that 
the company would accept a proposition to refund its debt at 2A 
per cent interest, the payment to be based upon a term of 100 
years, instead of 3 per cent and 50 years, as proposed in the bill. 

THE Central Pacific Railroad Company was also represented at 
the meeting by Vice-President Huntington. He made no ar- 
gument and confined himself to answering a few questions. Upon 
hearing Mr. Wilson's proposition he said that if more liberal 
terms were grauted the Union Pacific Company the Central Pacific 
should also be afforded the same indulgence. Inasmuch as its 
earnings and prospects were below those of the Union Pacific, if 
better terms were granted that road, the Central Pacific debt (fixed 
in the bill for a term of 100 years and 2 per cent interest) should 
be favored in a corresponding degree by a further reduction of 
interest and extension of time. If this were done he would be 
willing to apply part of the earnings of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road toward the repayment of the debt of the Central Pacific. 
THE license plan embodied in the bill now before Congress, for 
regulating and controlling Canadian railways doing business 
in the United States, does not seem to Mr. Schrieber, the chief en- 
gineer of the Dominion railways, to be practicable. He points 
out that the United States connections of Canadian roads are dis- 
tinct corporations and operated at present under the United 
States laws. He does not see how it is possible any way for the 
United States to single out certain railways or portions of rail- 
ways and bring them under special law, and says that even if 
Burton's or a similar law goes into operation, it would soon be 
repealed under pressure of public opinion. 

THE Victoria, Port Crescent & Chehalis Railroad Company has 
been organized by officers of the Northern Pacific, and the line 
will be built as a branch of that road. It will start from one of 
the towns on Gray's Harbor, extending thence in a northerly di- 
rection to Port Crescent on the Straits of Fuca, and will be about 
125 miles long. About twelve miles, from Port Crescent south, 
are now in process of construction. Survey will be completed 
next year, when it is expected contracts for further construction 
work will be let. 

THE Tillamook Railway and Navigation Company, with office 
at Tenton, Tillamook County, has been incorporated for the 
construction and maintenance of a road along the Tillamook 
River, with the main line from South Prairie slough to the head- 
waters of the Tillamook. Capital stock, $100, 000. Incorporators, 
Wra. Squires, B. S. Thompson and L. B. Handley. 

A LONDON journal gives an account of the turning the first 
sod of the Imperial British East African Company's railway, 
which is to extend from Port Reltx, Mombasa, to Kavirondo on 
Victoria Nyanza. The starting point of this pioneer road, which 
will run from the Indian Ocean to the great inland lake, made 
famous by Livingstone and Stanley, lies in the burning latitude of 
five degrees north of the equator, and is about 150 miles north 
from the important port of Zanzibar. The completion of the pro- 
posed railway will mark a new era in the history of Africa. It 
means the entrance of civilization into the heart of barbarism. 



1884 




VINTAGE. 



Deutz & Geldermann's Gold Lack Sec, 

Superior to toy other Chumj-iiKne Imported. 

CABINET GREEN SEAL. 

This favorite and well-known Wine is admirably adapted for banquets 
and festive gatherings, in magnums, quart* and pints. 

Charles Meinecke &. Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 

HIGHLAND EVAPORATED CREAM. 




Absolutely Pure, 

Unsweetened. 

Awarded Gold Medal at the Paris Universal 
Exposition Oyer all tompelitors. 

A popular table luxury. A supe- 
rior and most economical culinary ar- 
ticle, and a perfect infants' food, be- 
ing thoroughly sterilized. 

It may be diluted with either hot or 
cold water to the consistency of fresh 
milk or cream, and may be used for any 
and all purposes for which fresh cream 
or milk are used. For sale by all whole- 
sale grocers. 





The John T. Cutting Co., Agents, 

San Francisco, California. 

Macintoshed Coats! 

—AND— 

c l o^ik: s 

FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. 

goodyear~r"ubber CO 

B. H. PEASE, Jr., j A „ ellts 

557 and 559 Market Street, San Francisco. 

GO TO 

Or. W. CLABK Sc CO., 
653 Market Street, 

FOB 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

Ruinart Pere & Fils 

VIN BRUT, 1884. 




Donald de v. Graham, Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast 

124 SASiSOME STREET, S. F. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




Judging from present appearances, the year 1891 
PUGILISTIC, will be an eventful one in pugilistic circles the 
world over. This particular branch of sport is 
booming as it never boomed before in both England and Australia, 
while this country, probably, is monopolizing the lion's share of 
the pastime. 

During the past six months New Orleans has taken the lead, as 
far as American cities are concerned, in promulgating glove con- 
tests, but now San Francisco is coming to the front once more., 
and there is no reason why, if matters are managed judiciously, 
the patrons of ring pastimes in this city should not be able to in- 
dulge their fancies without clashing with public morals or offend- 
ing the majesty of the law. 

The first and greatest event of the year, which, is still in its in- 
fancy, was the memorable middle-weight contest for the champion- 
ship of the world, which took place between Bob B'itzsimmons, 
of New Zealand, and Jack Dempsey, of America, at New Orleans, 
on the evening of January 14th. No event since the great heavy- 
weight contest between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain, had 
created such world-wide interest, and when the men met to de- 
cide the question of superiority, there were gathered around the 
ring representative sporting men from every city in the Union. 

Deinpsey's well known generalship, allied to an extended string 
of victories, made him a strong favorite in tbe betting, but as tbe 
hour of the contest approached, it was made apparent that a big 
pile of Fitzsimmons money had been held in reserve, and the men 
toed the scratch with the betting at evens, the Fitzsimmons 
crowd being the more anxious to wager on the result. 

The fight was a thoroughly one-sided one. Fitzsimmons, with 
his broad, sunburnt shoulders, hairy arms and six feet of stature, 
loomed up beside the luckless Nonpareil like a giant beside a 
pigmy, and the American representative was never dangerous at 
any stage of the game. The New Zealander, who is as hard as the 
horseshoe nails he has been in the habit of hammering at his 
forge, fairly smothered poor Jack, cuffing him about tbe head and 
ribs unmercifully and keeping up such a ding-dong pace through- 
out that all Dempsey's generalship and shifty tactics went for 
naught, and he was stretched out on the floor a defeated man in 
the thirteenth round. 

The form displayed by Fitzsimmons was a revelation to old- 
time sports who had watched many a hard fought battle, and the 
general impression prevailed that as far as the middle-weight 
division is concerned, he will be cock of the walk for many 
years to come. It is understood that the victorious Antipo- 
dean is going on the road under Parson Davies' management, 
and such being the case, he will not need to trouble his head 
about match-making for a long time. Should he, however, desire 
to enter the lists again in the future, he will probably have to look 
among the lighter class of heavy weights for an opponent. He is 
certainly big enough, and powerful enough to cope with such men 
as Joe Choynski, and many think that he could make things ex- 
ceedingly interesting for Mr. Jim Corbett. Corbett, however, has 
another engagement in view, viz: a contest at the California Ath- 
letic Club with the celebrated colored Antipodean, Peter Jackson. 
This match, which is for a trophy valued at $10,000, takes place 
on May 2lst next, and in the meantime Corbett has gone East for 
a trip. He was an interested spectator at the late contest at New 
Orleans, and a night or two after the event Corbett took a benefit 
at one of the New Orleans Athletic clubs. His manager, a yourfg 
Californran, named Stenzel, who does not by any means come 
up to the Parson Davies standard, disheartened at the number 
of persons who "held their hands out" in connection with the 
arranging of Corbett's benefit, and after the "count up" at the end 
of the show both pugilist and manager decided that exhibition 
boxing, unless preceded by something phenomenal in the way of 
ring achievements on the part of the star, is not an extraordinary 
paying venture. 

They therefore resolved to eliminate the show business from their 
tour, which from now until their return to San Francisco will be 
simply a pleasure trip. With this resolve in their minds, the ad- 
vance agent, a Mr. Armstrong, was discharged, and after a visit 
to New York Corbett will return to San Francisco and immedi- 
ately go into training for the May interview with the dusky Peter. 
Jackson, at the present time, is fulfilling a sparring engagement 
at the Tivoli, and many who have seen him opine that he is not 
the man that he used to be. While it is true, however, that Pe- 
ter has led a fast life, the almost inevitable result of a series of 
successes in the prize ring, there does not, to the ordinary observ- 
er, appear to be anything in his general appearance to denote that 
he is wasting away. He does not complain of ill-health or loss 
of strength in any marked degree, and those who know 
him are aware that once he starts in to train he works as regu- 
larly and faithfully as a clock and leaves no stone unturned to 
bring himself to the scratch in the best possible condition. This 
the more particularly when he has a finish contest in view, and 
when those who are prone to look upon the colored cham- 



pion as a back number, have sized him up after he has a few 
weeks' training behind him, they may begin to wonder if, after 
all, the conqueror of Jim Smith and Joe McAuliffe has not a few 
fights left in him yet. 

The first contest to take place at the California Athletic Club 
will be between Young Mitchell and George La Blanche, the 
Marine. This will take place on February 20th, and should be 
a very interesting affair, as the men are evenly matched. 

George Godfrey, of Boston, and Jake Kilrain, of Baltimore, 
meet at the same club in March. Both men are expected to arrive 
in town shortly. 

In amateur athletic circles, matters are rather 
ATHLETIC, quiet just now, and as far as the outdoor men are 
concerned, likely to remain so for a couple of 
months. The indoor championships, which take place in the 
Mechanics' Pavilion in April next, are looked forward to with 
interest, and tbe local men are training steadily for the different 
events. 

It is expected that the all-round gymnastic tournament of the 
Olympic Club, which takes place in the club gymnasium next 
month, will be the most interesting affair of its kind that has 
ever taken place on the Coast. From present appearances the 
entries will be very numerous. 

The Olympic Club's annual championship wrestling tourna- 
ment commenced last Thursday evening, too late for the names 
of the winners to be given in this week's sporting column. 

The old complaint of rinkomania is epidemic in 

SKATING. San Francisco once again, and the noise that issues 

from Mechanics' Pavilion between eight and ten 

o'clock every evening is like the subdued roar of breakers upon a 

sandy beach. 

The management have added a zest to the pastime lately by 
instituting several skating races, all of which have proved ex- 
tremely exciting. 

Delmont and Snowden, probably two of the fastest skaters in 
the world, had a series of races to decide the short distance cham- 
pionship of America. The distance was two miles and each suc- 
ceeded in winning a race. The third and deciding race was won 
by Delmont, who covered the distance in 6m. 13s., breaking the 
best previous American record of 6m. 16£s. The race was for 
$250 aside and $100 added by the Olympian Skating Club. 

On Wednesday evening last the great event of the season, a six 
day race, started, twelve skaters shooting away from the mark 
when the pistol was fired at four o'clock. Snowden, who is better 
at long distance journeys than any other form of race, soon ac- 
quired a lead, and, when time was called at ten o'clock, he had 
covered 94 miles. Waldstein, the California champion, was next 
on the list with 91 miles, 6 laps, while Delmont, whom it was 
thought would be well up among the leaders, tainted from over 
exertion, and had to be carried from the track when he had cov- 
ered 77 miles, 6 laps. 

The race will continue for six days, the hours for the competi" 
tors to be on the track being between four and ten each evening. 
If no accident occurs Snowden w : .ll, in all probability, prove the 
winner. 

The Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeder's Association 
TURF, is considering the advisability of offering a stallion pro- 
duce stakes. If it is decided to do so, the stake will be 
for the produce of 1891, and the race will be trotted in 1894. If 
the scheme matures tbe stake will be termed the champion stal- 
lion produce stakes, and its guaranteed value will be $5,000. 

The conditions as shadowed out are as follows: One hundred 
dollars entrance fee will be required to name a stallion, which en- 
trance will make all his produce of this year eligible to start. One 
owner can start but one colt. Ten days prior to the date selected 
for the race, owners will be required to name their colts and pay 
$50 each, and on the day preceding the race $100 additional will 
be required in order to start. 

The association has decided upon a number of colt races to be 
trotted at the meeting to be held next fall. They will be divided 
into three classes, viz: free for all, class and aspirant stakes. 

Baseball matters have been comparatively quiet 
BASEBALL, for the last month; from this time on the interest 
will be revived. A week ago the California league 
held its annual meeting and awarded the championship of last 
season to San Francisco. After perfecting a temporary organiza- 
tion by re-electing the officers of last season the meeting adjourned 
until to-morrow, when the status of Stockton and San Jose in the 
league will be determined. In the East tbe baseball controversy 
of last year is a memory of the past, the players and their league 
have been absorbed by their more powerful rival, the National 
League. Many of the veteran ball players who have hereto- 
fore almost dictated the salaries for which they would play, will 
feel themselves fortunate in being able even to secure employ- 
ment. The California contingent are in a state of nervous anxiety 
not knowing whether they will be able to secure re-engagements 
in the East. 



The practical result of philosophy is to enable us to bear with resig- 
nation the afflictions of our neighbors, but at present no scheme has 
been devised to enable us to bear with equanimity our own an- 
noyances, except as far as is known, the fine drinks that are sold at 
I the Grand Central Wine Rooms, 16-18 Third street. 



Jan. 21, 1891. 



SAN FR \ Vl<< ONE 



1 ETTER. 



11 



THE LATEST IN THE BLYTHE QAC 

ON Wednesday of last wMk M- I Mb Blythe 

upon all the parties in the litigation N (ore Judge Coffey re- 
lating to the SStata of Thorns* II. Blytbe, deceased. In r pi 
statement on motion for new trial. Toll document emhraees, an 
etween nine hundred and a ihoui rlttan pages, 

divided into two sections, one i overing tbe < laim of tbe plat o tiff, 
Florence Hlythe. and too other tin- \-. ol Mrs. Blytbe herself . 
Her attorneys have certainly exhibited great industry, and have 
i that, so far as tbey art- concerned, the contest Iias only 
passed through one phase and will be very severe and protl 
before a final result is reached. Tin assignment of errors on be- 
half of Mrs. Hlythe, which is at once teres and elaborate, is in 
Itself an argument ol remarkable strength, and to the common 
mind, proves effectually the enormous combined strength of the 
testimony she introduced on the trial. She disavows clearly any 
reflection upon the manner in which the plaintiff's case was pre- 
sented in Court, but she complains of the irregularities in the 
proceedings on her behalf by persons who actually or nominally 
represented her outside of the court-room, and who were, at all 
events, Interested in her success. 8he alludes to numerous at- 
tempts to interfere with her successful presentation of her own 
claim, and particularly mentions the contempt proceedings 
against Jerome Deasy, which have never been decided, and the 
episode of the McLaren will, as having exerted a depressing in- 
fluence upon a few of her witnesses, some of whom were also 
reached by other methods. Her objections to the attacks made 
upon her to the effect that she had concealed or destroyed a will 
or an adoption paper, which she insists were wholly without 
justification, and to the plaintiff's failure to recognize her contri- 
butions to the literature of. the case, which she had preserved for 
years, when she might have suppressed them, are strong and 
convincing. She also alludes, directly and forcibly, to the rejec- 
tion of new witnesses whom she bad discovered towards the end 
of the trial, upon the ground that their testimony would be 
merely cumulative, when the evidence of sixty-four witnesses 
who would have been corroborated by them, and which was vir- 
tually uncontradicted, was afterwards disregarded. The import- 
ance of these new witnesses is shown by the affidavits of Henry 
Elleau, D. J. Toohey and others. 

Under the head of the insufficiency of the evidence to justify 
the decision, the specifications are thirty-three, and they are very 
explicit, consecutive and vigorous, although expressed with per- 
fect courtesy. Wherever the finding of the Court denies the ex- 
istence of the marriage relation between Mrs. Blytbe and Thomas 
H. Blythe, it is specifically criticised, and especially is the inconsist- 
ency of one of the conclusions of fact pointed out, in which Mrs. 
Blythe is asserted to have been the mistress of Blythe, and, at the 
same time, to have consented to the adoption of Florence Blythe 
into the family. The facts relating to the mutual consent of Mrs. 
Blythe and Thomas H. Blythe to become husband and wife, about 
May 19th, 1878, are grouped together, and a great variety of cir- 
cumstances, such as Blythe's notions of spiritualism and of affin- 
ity, his disregard of conventionalism, and his apprehensions of 
Nellie Firmin brought to bear to demonstrate the probability of 
the truth of Mrs. Blythe's testimony on that point, which is fur- 
ther proved to have been corroborated or sustained by sixty-four 
witnesses to a manner of life and to declarations and acknowledge- 
ments which were only consistent with a marital relation. The 
reasons for any temporary concealment of the true conditions on 
which Blythe and herself came together are stated at length, and 
the fact that the explanations on this part of the record are not 
assailed by proof is made transparent. But Mrs. Blythe is not con- 
tented with this showing. She invites attention to definite intro- 
ductions of herself to nine witnesses by Blythe as " Mrs. Blythe " 
or " my wife; " to introductions by herself of Blythe to three wit- 
nesses as " my husband; " to introductions of herself by other 
persons in Blythe's presence as " Mrs. Blythe; " to a great number 
of references to her by Blythe in the presence of at least twelve 
witnesses as " my wife " or " Mrs. Blythe: '' to two references to 
her by Blythe, in connection with his home, as " the Misses," and 
to the following significant language used upon an important oc- 
casion by Blythe to Mrs. Frances Pique : " As long as my name is 
Blythe her name will be Blythe, and, when my name is something 
else, her name will be something else. I want you to call her Mrs. 
Blythe." 

Still, we have not reached the end of the indictment against 
the decision. It appears that twenty-four witnesses or more 
knew the lady as Mrs. Blythe, and that she was frequently intro- 
duced by that name, that a large number of receipts and bills, 
some paid by Mr. Blythe himself, and two letters of condolence, 
in allot which she was mentioned as Mrs. Blythe, were incon- 
testably proved and received in evidence, although they were but 
remnants found by Mrs. Blythe after the death of her husband, 
and that the witnesses against her also established bills made to 
her, subsequent to his decease, in the same way. A letter ad- 
dressed to her as Mrs. Blythe was also put in evidence, which 
Blythe himself had received in his lifetime. Twenty-six wit- 
nesses on her own behalf and at least eight witnesses on the part 
of the plaintiff testified to relations between Mrs. Blytbe and the 
deceased, which embraced every conceivable feature of a refined 



tic life, and demonstrated that, whatever lb« mav have 
legally been, Mr-., Blyi character and reputation were 

not In tbe slights*! . | ( did exactly srbal a chute, 

educated, and affectionate wife, wall reread In household econ- 
omy, would here dont She luperlntended the household, did 
the marketing, looked after Mr. Blythe'l wardrobe, . 
appropriate position at the table, made aumeroui artistic decor- 
entertained guests with vocal and instrumental music, and 
ned almost constantly at home The domesticity ol these 
people, if th.y were not husband and wife, was unexampled, and 
it was exhibited and illustrated in every Utter written by Mrs. 
Blythe, even though, for reasons which were dearly explained, 
Lddressed him as her ancle and signed herself as his niece. 
Several of these letter? closed with an Invocation to the Almighty 
for his welfare. Twenty-four witnesses and perhaps more, sev- 
eral of them most strongly relied on by the plaintiff, proved 
almost Innumerable declarations by Blythe of bis intention to es- 
tablish a patriarchal home on the Colorado river, where he ex- 
pected to spend his declining years, and of which Mrs. Blythe 
was to be the presiding genius. The plan of the projected house 
with one room for them both was identified by (Jeneral Andrade. 
In a great number of letters similar declarations were contained. 

When to all these facts is added that Blythe died almost in 
Mrs. Blythe's arms, that, for many months, she guarded his body 
with tbe most tender care, and occupied the same apartments 
which had been his home during the last years of his life, and 
that she voluntarily and disinterestedly tried to aid the plaintiff 
to assert whatever rights she possessed and furnished the money 
which brought her from England to California, it is difficult to 
imagine a claim apparently more impregnable. 

It is further shown that the sixty-four witnesses for Mrs. 
Blythe were residents of our own State, occupying respectable, 
although, in some instances, humble positions, not interested in 
the outcome of the litigation, not paid for their services, beyond 
legal fees and expenses, not trained to meet the expanding exi- 
gences of a case, and who had not made any claim against or re- 
ceived money or favors from the representatives of Blythe's es- 
tate. In these respects they presented marked contrasts to the 
leading witnesses on tbe other side; but, nevertheless, as the as- 
signment of errors asserts, their uncontradicted testimony was 
ignored and that for the plaintiff accepted. Particular stress is 
laid upon the proposition that this was not an instance of a large 
number of witnesses whose evidence was overcome by a smaller 
number, but that, on the contrary, they were usually the sole 
witnesses to the facts they swore to on the stand; and yet it is 
urged that, without being impeached, they were practically set 
aside. It is even claimed that impeached witnesses for the plaint- 
iff were believed against Mrs. Blythe, and that portions of the 
evidence of the same witnesses which were favorable to the 
plaintiff were accepted, while other portions of the evidence of 
the same witnesses in support of Mrs. Blytbe were ignored. 

A much more full condensation of this exposition of Mrs. 
Blythe's case would be interesting reading, but our space is too 
limited for further expansion. The assignment against Florence 
Blythe is scarcely less full and quite as energetic. It is claimed 
with strength and earnestness that the acceptance of Mrs. Julia 
Asbcroft's account of the circumstances preceding the birth of 
Florence Blythe is an impossible draft upon credulity, and that 
the entire case for the little girl, including all of Blythe's declara- 
tions and acknowledgements, turns upon this incredible and 
uncorroborated evidence. Mrs. Blythe is emphatic in the propo- 
sition that tbe testimony not only proved that Florence was not 
Blythe's daughter, but did prove that she was the daughter of 
Joseph James and Julia Ashcroft, and that her claim to Blythe's 
estate is unfounded and fraudulent. Here, again, the specifica- 
tions are very numerous and minute, and the assertion of Mrs. 
Julia Ashcroft that she was seduced under promise of marriage 
are mercilessly analyzed. The antecedents, character, career and 
alleged duplicity of James Crisp Perry and his wife, Kate Perry, 
the loans of money to both of them by several leading witnesses 
for Florence Blythe, the large claims made by these witnesses 
against Blythe's estate and allowed and paid, tbe fact that Blythe 
never saw Florence and had no information about her except that 
derived from Julia Ashcroft and James Crisp Perry, whose aman- 
uensis was his wife, and the attacks made upon Joseph James 
Ashcroft and his mother and sister, as well as other reputable and 
disinterested witnesses, are all graphically exhibited, but we are 
unable at this time to complete the contrasting pictures. 

It is a very pretty quarrel as it stands, but it would be prema- 
ture, at least, to say that Mrs. Blythe has the worst of it. She 
has not made much noise in the press, in the hotel corridors, or 
in tbe street cars, and has had no cartoons printed to exaggerate 
herself and to depreciate her opponent, but she has been heard 
from now in a way which, we will venture to say, will command 
respect both before the Courts and in the community. 

Those who listen with credulity to the whispers of fancy and pur- 
sue with eagerness the phantoms of hope, will not, like Dr. Johnson's 
Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia, be pursuingan ignis fatuus, but will 
find that neither fancy nor hope are doomed to disappointment, 
after partaking of a dinner as served at the Original Swam's Bakery, 
[ 213 Sutter street. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




Mew York City, January 17, 1891. 

THE choicest morsel of gossip rolled on the tongues of those 
who are in the swim, and, naturally, on a great many of 
those who are not, is the recent engagement of Miss Willing of 
Philadelphia and Mr. "Jack" Astor of the world at large, but 
more particularly of New York. The amount of talk, comment 
and prognostications that have from time to time been Hales on 
the subject of this long looked-for engagement, would fill a highly 
sensational work of many volumes. At last the aifair is tin fait 
accompli, and the mother of the young lady from the city of 
Quakers will bask in the sunlight of every match-making mam- 
ma's openly avowed admiration for quite a little while. The for- 
tunate girl who has secured the greatest native matrimonial catch 
will long be held up to social debutantes as the most diplomatic, 
well-behaved and dutiful daughter that ever realized to the full 
the acme of natural pride and ambition. The sneering stories 
that have been written here and there of the young fiance's des- 
perate chase of her ftUw from one end of the civilized world to 
the other, will now fade into oblivion in the announcement of her 
ultimate, glorious, well-earned success; and the opponents of the 
victor will have to retire into temporary obscurity until such a 
time as they deem themselves fit to bait their hooks for smaller 
fish in, perhaps, other waters. 

# # * 
San Franciscans are daily becoming more and more known in 
ultra-fashionable New York society, and in nearly all cases prove 
to be most pronounced successes. One of the latest and best ap- 
preciated acquisitions in our social midst is Mrs. Fair, formerly 
of California, and the mother of the newly-married Mrs. Herman 
Oelrichs. Her daughter has rapidly mounted the ladder of socie- 
ty, until, so far as beauty is concerned, she stands upon one of 
the topmost rungs in company with the acknowledged belles of 
the city. I saw the handsome bride, with Mr. Herman Oelrichs 
and his mother-in-law, the other evening at the last Assembly 
ball, and seeing them together it was not difficult to conjecture 
from which branch of the family the fair mariee inherits her unu- 
sual personal attractions. Two other fair Californians, in the 
persons of Mrs. John S. Hager and Miss Emrueline Hager, widow 
and daughter, I believe, of the late Collector of the Port of San 
Francisco, are spending the winter in New York at the Fifth Av- 
enue Hotel. Mrs. Hager, in spite of the unavoidable decree of 
nature that she must necessarily be older than her daughter, is 
scarcely less attractive than Miss Emmeline Hager, who is one of 
the most beautiful belles that New Yorkers have been dazzled 
with from the Pacific slope. Mrs. Hager has been married twice, 
and will be remembered by old society residents of Lt. Louis as 
the handsome and accomplished consort of James H. Lucas, who 
was one of the richest real estate owners in Missouri. Despite 
the daughter's queenly beauty, present comfortable fortune and 
the prospective millions of her mother, she is still heart whole 
and fancy free to all appearances, and the jeunesse dorte of giddy 
Gotham is in a quandary to discover whether she will be as diffi- 
cile with the marriage-seeking youth of the East as she has cer- 
tainly proved to be with the batchelor of the Occident. 

The Robert Ray Hamilton case is quite the most important one 
before the courts at the present time. The amount of interest, if 
not sympathy, excited in the breasts of a large number of New 
York's fashionable women is inexplicable, to say the least. Every 
day, when the Surrogate's Court opens, a large crowd of closely- 
veiled, well-dressed females presents itself for admission, and as 
many as can be accommodated in the limited space allotted to 
spectators in the court-room, are admitted. That the Surrogate 
should have ruled that the ceremonial marriage which took place 
between the deceased Robert Ray Hamilton and the contestant, 
Eva — simply because of her having lived as the wife of Joshua 
Manor, without the supposititious advantage of any ceremony at 
all — is null and void, has caused no Iittl§ surprise in legal circles. 
But, as a matter of fact, such a ruling is in strict accordance with 
the laws, relating to marriage, of the State of New York. A 
ceremony, supposed to be paramount, sanctified and conclusive 
in almost every other corner of the globe, is in this, our presum- 
ably enlightened Empire State, a matter of no importance what- 
ever, where previous criminal relations have been in existence 
between one of the wedded parties and another. The incontro- 
vertible evil of such a condition of things has been amply 
demonstrated time and time again. Yet little or no legislative 
effort is made to repeal a statute provocative of so much social 
harm, immoral results and scandalous litigation. The widow of 
any rich man, calling herself such by the authority of the church 
and perhaps a family bearing her dead husband's name, may now 
easily be deprived, at one fell swoop of the law, of every stick of 
her legitimate property, by a claim made and put in by any ad- 
venturess of sufficient enterprise and legal backing to carry the 
case through. Of course, in the Hamilton affair, things are re- 



versed, inasmuch that the lawful, church-made, contesting wife 
ie an adventuress ftf the very worst type; but the principle, if 
such a ruling can be called one, or be supposed to contain one, 
remains the same, and is a living monument of the practical 
justice of New York. The latest development, one betraying a 
shrewd move on the part of the Hamilton family's counsel, was 
the serving of divorce papers on Eva Manor by the unsanctified 
husband, Joshua Manor, which was successfully accomplished 
on Thursday last. This opens up a new channel that will un- 
doubtedly have a strong bearing upon the ultimate result of the 
suit. 

# * # 

My prophesies anent the at one time famous Koch lymph, of 
which I have more than once spoken to the readers of the News 
Letter, are being realized more and more every day. Prof. 
Virchow's report in Berlin, of six post-mortem examinations of 
people who bad died after inoculation, and his distinct statement 
that death had been undoubtedly produced by the virus, has pro- 
duced a mild species of terror amongst those practitioners who 
have been using the lymph upon patients in the New York hos- 
pitals. Virchow's report has called forth a disclosure on the part 
of Prof. Koch, as to the actual composition of the virus; its man- 
ufacture being so clearly explained that physicians will be under 
no further obligation of sending to Europe for it, should they in- 
tend to continue experimenting. I have been informed by sev- 
eral leading medical men of the city that they, personally, have 
decided to abandon it altogether, so far as testing it on human be- 
ings is concerned. Even the physician of the nineteenth century 
is alive to the fact that it is not well to play with fire and edged 
tools, where the life of man is at stake. 

# # # 

New York has had no first nights this week, although, with few 
exceptions, all the theatres are doing excellent business. In spite 
of Mr. Lawrence Barrett's enthusiastic reception on the first pro- 
duction of Mr. William Young's new tragedy, Ganelon, the play 
has proved an absolute failure, and will be withdrawn to-night in 
favor of Francesca da Rimini on Monday. Babbler. 



The Lady 

Who has fine Hair, and desires to pre- 
serve its color, abundance, and lustre, 
should use Ayer's Hair Vigor as a 

dressing. It keeps the scalp clean and 
cool, and is by far the most exquisite 
toilet preparation in the market. 

B. M. Johnson, M. D., Thomas Hill, 
Mo., says: "I have used Ayer's Hair 
Vigor in my family for a number of 
years, and regard it as the best hair 
preparation I know of. It keeps the 
scalp clean, the hair soft and lively, and 
preserves the original color. My wife 
has used it for a loug time with most 
satisfactory results." 

Mrs. S. A. Rock, of Anderson, Texas, 
writes : "At the age of 34, in Monroe, 
La., I had a severe attack of swamp, or 
malarial, fever. After I got well ray 
hair commenced coming out, and so con- 
tinued until it had well nigh all gone. 
I used several kinds of hair restorers, 
hut they did no good. A friend gave me 
a bottle of Ayer's Hair Vigor. Before 
finishing the first "bottle my hair began 
to grow, and "by the time I used three 
bottles, I had a fine head of hair." 

Ayer's Hair Vig©r, 

PREPAUKD BY 

Or. J. C. Ayer 8c Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Sold by Druggists aud Perfumers. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

.A QTJIBT HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 

PACIFIC TOWEL CCDl^ZFJ^lSrir 

9 LICK PLACE, 

Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates: 

5 Clean Haud Towels each week, $1.00 per mouth ; 12 Clean Hand Towels 

each week, $1.50 per mouth; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.00 per 

mouth : 6 clean Roller Towels each week, $1.25 per month. 

Special Rates for Larger Quantities. 




BAN Kl: \\ci-' SEWS I ETTER 



18 






WITH whilfl gnvrns :'. I UU 

in the natural color, with high u* r\* ami a small buckle on 
thr tnilcp. '■■'! 1 and silver K t >1 sh< ■ i atc in raeta grttt demand 
that it is difficult to prooure the kid in raflatent qatntl 

lh« demand. Velvet calf in nil colon b Qocd for evening 
shoes, which are now trimmed round the top with bands of gold 
Or dive? laid on colored satin. Bride* mAidt 1 shoe* are made of 
white Bnode, covered all over with <tars of bead embroidery or of 
checks of baby ribbon Milched on smoothly, the points of the 
checks meeting over the foot. 

The " robedeohambre." to slip on after the cotillion or the opera 
is over, is made of the very softest silk in pale yellow, lined with 

eider cloth, and re-lined with white silk, and has a collar and 
border all down both sides, the front of natural otter. They do 
not fasten at all, but are made BO roomy and capacious that one 
side folds over the other like a double-breasted coat, and a cord 
and tassel secures it all. The contrast of the warm fur with the 
delicate lace frills of the night lingerie beneath and the soft fulness 
of the throat is very pretty. 



Muffs for evening wear favored by the elegantes are very dainty 
and tiny little affairs, made of violets, rosebuds or humming birds 
in conjunction with lace, silk and plush. An odd little affair is 
niched with steel lace, lined with chinchilla, and on the outside a 
diamond crab holds in its claws a bunch of tulips. The muffs are 
worn suspended by a gold snake chain, which goes round the 
neck, and their chief ration d'etre seems to be to afford an oppor- 
tunity for wearing the chain. 



The tea gown is rapidly giving place to the house dress, built 
somewhat upon the lines, but closer trimmed, and less suggestive 
of a lounging dress. It is a close fitting robe, cut en princessc, 
slightly draped in front and trailing in the back. It is made with 
a high or half-high neck, with sleeves or with mere wings of 
crepe, and can be put on for afternoon tea and worn all the even- 
ing, unless there is a dinner party necessitating full dress. 

The latest thing in weddings is to have the room in which the 
bridal party are served with the wedding breakfast decorated with 
a ceiling of real roses, from the petals of which flash electric lights 
in rose-colored globes, and to have upon the table a tower of roses, 
in which is bung a chime of bells. A golden cord extends from 
each bell to the different ladies, and between the courses wedding 
chimes are sweetly sounded. 



The great rage of the season is for velvet ribbons — narrow ones 
tied under the chin or hanging down the back in floating streamers. 
Black ribbons and white ones, and all the new malarial colors that 
would look like mistakes if they weren't so stylish. Collarettes 
of piece velvet, shaped to fit the neck and match the bonnet, are 
worn, and are sometimes fringed with pearls or bordered with 
diamonds. 

A very dainty and becoming evening dress for a young girl is of 
pale yellow silk, with chiffon flounces caught up with Cupid bows 
of silver. The top of the skirt is shirred on to the corsage be- 
neath a silver girdle clasped with two Cupid bows, and puffs on 
the shoulder have the same device in silver. 



Gold and silver pointed lace, jeweled, is one of the newest 
trimmings, and is set with all the imitation gems. A beautiful 
new evening fabric is of black silk Brussels net, strewn with a 
design of double clover leaves, carried out in gold set with large 
milliners' rubies and sapphires. 

A new figure introduced into the cotillion is to have the gentle- 
men armed with toy foils, spiked with buttons in the shape of 
powder puffs covered with powder, and to have them fence a bit 
with their partners before the waltz. 

The last fashion in jewelry is the revival of the long gold chain, 
twisted round the neck and falling to the waist, of grandmother's 
period. The revival however, necessitates the addition of pearl 
clasps to the chains. 

The Louis XIII. coat, with short back and long-tabbed front, 
is effective for black silk dresses when made with sleeves and tabs 
and collar of velvet, brocaded all over with a close shell or vermi- 
celli pattern in gold. 

The engagement bangle, or bracelet, is a pair of bangles con- 
nected with an invisible and secret spring and studded with balls 
of gold set in jewels. 

Mothers be Sure and Use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
Children while Teething. Price, 25 cents a bottle. 



GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE! 



SWEEPING REDUCTIONS 



IN EVEHY DEPARTMENT. 



Oqr Regular Annual Clearance Silo, now In pragrsas, aflbrdi v\ EX 
CKPTION ALLY FAVORABLE UPPORTOMTY fur all who have an 

ent or prospective need of r>rj ■; In, as Ira hare madeadcep and im- 

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ovtona to our auuual Stock taxing-. 

Allar. . <ill during thla treat sale inn) Inspect tho 

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Ladies' and Children's Outer Garments, 
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Silks, Velvets, Laces, Gloves, 

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National Direct Current Dynamos for Isolated Lighting. Western Electric 
Arc Dynamos and Lamps. Racine Automatic Engines, Boilers and Oil- 
Burning Outfits. A full line of Electric Lighting Materials and Supplies. 

We are prepared to undertake the construction of Electrical Plants of 
whatever magnitude. Correspondence solicited. 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 
314 Calfornia Street, San Fraucisco, Cal. 

WOMAN'S HOSPITAL. 

THE CALIFORNIA WOMAN'S HOSPITAL, 
On Sacramento Street, 

Between Bakeraud Lyon, is now open for the reception of patients. 
There is a Free Ward, Pay Ward, and Rooms for Private Patients. Pure 
air, good diet, aud the best of nursing and medical attendance are bestowed 
on all alike Out patieuts treated gratuitously. For admission apply at 
Ho spital. 

PACIFIC IRON WORKS, 

127 First Street, 

MANUFACTURE 

Boilers, Engines, and eve ry Description of Machinery I Castings 

Hazelton Boilers, Wheelock Automatic Cut-off Engines, 
Duncan Concentrators, Baker Horse Power. 

Iba, P. Rankin, President. Willis G. Dodd, Vice-Pres't aud Manager. 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO., 

MEECHAITT TAILORS, 

622 Market Street, up-stairs, opposite Palace Hotel, 

SAN FKANCISCO, CAL. 
Many Novelties in Imported Wear. Skirts to Order a Specialty 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




THERE is a large amount of work going on quietly under the 
surface to corral bonds on mining properties, both here and 
all over the coast, for the purpose of hawking them abroad; and 
we use the term » hawking" advisedly, for outside of the few re- 
sponsible men who can legitimately be termed promoters, there is 
not one of these individuals or mushroom firms which could float 
a peanut ranch in London. The Union Gold and Valley Gold, 
Ilex, und other affairs of the kind, have ended confidence in all 
adventurers, and a man requires to enter the London market with 
clean hands and some reputation to back him besides a banker's 
certificate, if he or his friends can expect to meet with success. 
Some promising mines here and in Mexico have recently been 
botched by getting into wrong hands, which is rank injustice to 
the owner who has his work cut out in the future to tide over the 
reputation of previous failure. The Guadalupe de los Keys, and 
two or three other valuable properties in the States of Durango 
and Sinaloa, Mexico, might be mentioned as instances of the 
kind, and yet we find owners willing to fall into the same trap 
time and again. It is only during the week that a property has 
been forwarded to London for sale by a promoter, who within 
sixty days has managed to knock out one of the finest ventures 
ever offered abroad. California dealers in mines should deal 
directly with principals in London, or elsewhere, if they cannot 
run across a responsible protnotor here. One half of the indi- 
viduals who brag about their English connections are safe to leave, 
severely alone on any proposition. 

* * * 

THE annual meeting of the Golden Gate Alluvial Company, 
which has just been held in London, resulted in a heavy in- 
crease of capital. The meeting was a very pleasant one through- 
out; the feeling of confidence in the future of the property and in 
its manager, Col. Frank McLaughlin, was most pronounced. 
The reports of the officers were plain and to the point, agreeably 
free from the exaggeration which is a marked feature of many 
statements prepared for the acceptance of shareholders in British 
mining companies. Nothing was said on this occasion, which can- 
not be corroborated by facts, and many things could have been 
added with perfect safety which would have pictured the future 
of the property in an even more favorable light. The new share 
issue will bring into the company's treasury the sum of $75,000, 
which, it is believed, will be more than sufficient to carry on the 
new works to completion. The weather, so far, has been very 
favorable for the enterprise, and it is not likely that any storms 
of a dangerous character will occur so late in the rainy season. 
While the shareholders on the other side of the Atlantic are, of 
course, more heavily interested in results, mining men here, of all 
classes, are giving the matter their closest attention. Success for 
Colonel McLaughlin means the revival of river mining in Cali- 
fornia, and the investment of millions of foreign capital. 
$1$ 

THE annual meeting of the Esmeralda Consolidated has just 
been held in London. It was largely attended and everything 
passed otf smoothly. The Directors announced that they expect a 
considerable return of bullion during the next few months. The 
outlay at the mine up to July 31st, as far as known, was $62,680, 
and the London charges $5,655. The capital amounts to 500,000 
shares of $5 each, and all but 25 cents per share has been called up 
on July 31st. There are also outstanding eight per cent, debentures 
for $47,005. One of the speakers at the meeting gave Superin- 
tendent Colcord a good send otf. "The Governor of a State in 
America," said he,-«'is as great a man in his own district as the 
President of the United States." 

It I 

THE annual stockholders meeting of the S. F. & N. P. Railway 
Company was held January 20th, the election resulting as fol- 
lows: President, J. F. Burgin; Vice President, P. N. Lilienthal; 
Treasurer, A. L. Seligman; Directors, Henry T. Scott, Russell J. 
Wilson, Charles F. Hanlon and Peter J. McGlynn; General Man- 
ager, H. C. Whiting; General Agent, W. H^ Menton; Secretary 
and Auditor, Thomas Mellersh. After the meeting had closed, 
Mr. Chas. F. Hanlon, the general counsel of the Company, on be- 
half of the executors, proposed the toast "To the New York 
firms interested in the property, Landenberg.Thallman & Co. and 
J. & W. Seligman & Co." The toast was drank and all expressed 
their sincerest wishes for the success of the Company ; and, altu- 
gether the meeting was most harmonious. 
*** 

THE annual meeting of the stockholders of the Mutual Savings 
Bank took place at the office, 33 Post street, on Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 20, 1891. The same officers were elected to serve for the en- 
suing year, as follows: President, James G. Fair; Vice Presidents, 
James Phelan and S. G. Murphy; Directors— Edward Barron, 
James Moffitt, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, Charles Cadwala- 
der, James D. Phelan; Cashier, James A. Thompson; Attorney, 
Frank J. Sullivan; Surveyor, P. J. Sullivan. 



THE annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pacific Auxil- 
iary Fire Alarm Company was held January 20th, and the fol- 
lowing Directors were elected for the ensuing year: Louis Sloss, 
Jr., J. C. Cobrian, Jas. D. Phelan, R. H. McDonald, Percy T. Mor- 
gan, Win. Fries, W. A. M. Van Bokkelan. The Directors after- 
wards met and elected officers as follows: Louis Sloss, Jr., Presi- 
dent; Percy Morgan, Vice President; Wm. Hanson, Secretary; 
Dr. R. H. McDonald, Treasurer. 

I It 

AN English contemporary, In reporting the meeting of Golden 
Gate Alluvial, remarks that " a vote of thanks was awarded 
to both the Directors and Superintendent, who has charge of the 
company's operations in Colorado." This is almost as bad as the 
London mining tout, who advised his clients the other day to sell 
shares in the Oroville mines and invest in Valley Gold, the San 
Bernardino wildcat. 

(I s 

WE are in receipt of private advices from London to the effect 
that suit has been brought in London by the London Cor- 
porations, Limited, to be relieved of their contract to take the bonds 
of the San Francisco Breweries, Limited. The differences as to 
profits and commission have been submitted to arbitration and the 
award of the arbitrators will be given in the course of a few days. 
What bearing this may have on the local combination it is diffi- 
cult to say, it being generally understood here that the owners of 
the different concerns have one and all been paid in full. So 
many statements have, however, been made on both sides through 
the daily press of this city, that it is difficult to arrive at the true 
status of affairs. The result of the present litigation in London 
will, however, lead in time to a more lucid understanding of all 
matters connected with the Trust, which have been so success- 
fully kept out of reach of public curiosity and meddlesome news- 
paper reporters. 

** * 

THERE is little to be said about the action of the local mining 
market during the week. Business has been dull and prices 
steady, a light fluctuation in the North End stocks being the only 
feature worthy of note. Those who are posted believe in better 
times ahead, and the sooner they come the better. San Fran- 
cisco is dull enough now, but it would be duller were the Stock 
Board compelled to close. Many people are not prepared to ad- 
mit this, but they will find it to be a fact, provided they live long 
enough. The following little conundrum may keep some of our 
readers guessing for some time to come: The News Letter pre- 
dicts that in the near future a mine or mines, quartz at that, will 
be located within a radius of fifty miles of San Francisco. Where 
is it? 

$$$ 

A DEPUTATION from the London Stock Exchange recently 
waited upon Mr. Liddledale, Governor of the Bank of England, 
and presented him with a well-worded address of high apprecia- 
tion for the services he and his co-directors rendered in grappling 
with the recent monetary crisis. It seems to be a general regret 
among the business men of the British metropolis that the name 
of Mr. Liddledale was not included in the list of New Year honors. 



AN English expert has bonded theWisconsin and Illinois mines at 
Grass Valley for $80,000, with the intention of floating it 
abroad. If he does not inflate the price beyond all reason, there 
is a prospect that the venture will prove successful. A shaft has 
been sunk a considerable distance under the superintendence of 
Mr. Abadie, of the North Star, and the prospects at the bottom are 
said to be favorable. 

Ill 

MR. JOHN MACKA Y arrived in town during the week to look 
after his many business interests on the coast. As usual the 
smart young men of the daily press put on their guessing caps 
and effect the belief that his presence here must be regarded as 
more or less mysterious. Millionaires, doubtless, find life itself 
burdensome at times. 

Ill 

WE are advised that George Pinney, accompanied by the Presi- 
dent of the Mountain Mine, near Sierra City, are en route 
from London, England, to inspect the property. The new tram- 
way has not yet been made to work, and all the miners have been 
discharged, leaving but two watchmen to guard the buildings. 
Ore is said to prospect satisfactorily to the owners. 

?*? 

A STRIKE of rich quartz is reported in No. 4 tunnel of the 
Young America mine, eight miles by road above Sierra City. 
This will undoubtedly give a new lease of life to this far-famed 
Sierra County mine. 

tit 

THE Doe Combination mining, in Calico District, have fallen 
upon evil times. They are asked to payback $522,000 by the 
owners of adjoining mines, who claim that ore valued at that 
amount was taken from their ground. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 



BAN Fi; WCI-m NEWS LETTER. 



15 




'Hear lb* Crier!" "What the dertl art thou;* 
* One thai will P l»y lb* d*rll. »lr. wtib Ton." 



IT is remarkable bow Yery soon ihe new office-holder. whOM 
poeltlon brings him into contact with the reporter;* of the daily 
press, is disciplined into line by the gentlemen of the fourth 
estate. Coroner Garwood is an example of the fact. When the 
Doctor first went into business, be was inclined to be cold and 
distant to the men of the press, ile believed that Morgue matters 
were made altogether too public, and that inquests should be con- 
ducted with a certain delicate secrecy. Matters that had come 
to bis official ear were not for the masses, and the results of au- 
topsies were private property. The reporters soon undeceived 
him. After a check or two they went for his scalp with an 
amusing unanimity of sentiment. They shot a few burning ar- 
rows into him, with a grim significance that they had plenty 
more shafts left in their quiver. The Coroner stood the first fire 
bravely enough, but finally it grew too warm for him, and he 
wisely struck bis haughty flag, and let the reporters have their 
own way. And now the Morgue, and all pertaining to it, is as 
open to them as the bay. There are no further hints about star- 
chamber proceedings, and they a«re welcome to attend as many 
autopsies as they please, and sit down and enjoy themselves. 
The liberty of the press is vindicated, and a season of harmony 
is promisingly inaugurated. 

YOUNG Mr. Blaine has got into trouble because he took bis 
shoes off in Baltimore society. That is a trivial offense in 
comparison to what occurred one evening this week in a very 
swell Jackson-street abode. The happy and the gay, the young 
and light-hearted had assembled, and the dance went merrily on. 
The lord of the manor did not appear. His lady excused him on 
the plea of illness — neuralgia she called it. Then came supper, 
and the table glistened with the brightest of crystal. The guests 
were seated and the terrapin stew sent up its delightful odors, 
while the champagne sat cooling upon the ice. Suddenly a tall 
apparition in snowy white noiselessly reeled into the banquet 
room, so noiselessly, indeed, that his presence was first indicated 
by a strong and pungent odor of lemon and strong waters. My 
lord was in his night attire, and furthermore was arrayed in the 
most glorious jag that any gentleman could desire at any period 
of the night or day. He was at the beginning of an affectionate 
speech, proposing his own health, when the servants captured 
and removed him. But when the lady said that he was under 
the inriuence of the opium he had taken to relieve the neuralgic 
pain, of course all the guests believed her. 

MR. ARTHUR McE WEN, who is a close observer of society, re- 
marked that at a grand banquet in Sacramento the other day, 
at which many statesmen were present, a lady committed the so- 
cial sin of picking her teeth with her fork. According to Mr. Mc- 
Ewen, the majority of the male guests most ungallantly removed 
their knives from their moutbs to laugh at her. This knife swal- 
lowing seems to be the besetting sin of many of our great men, 
nor does there appear to be any cure for it. In the dining rooms 
of the best hotels, at the tables of the best restaurants, the crav- 
ing for the steely flavor communicated by the knife to the mor- 
sel is unconquerable. Many of our wealthy young people have 
been sent to Europe for the sole and express purpose of eradi- 
cating this dangerous habit, and for months after their return 
seemed to have been cured. But the disease has almost invaria- 
bly broken out again in a more virulent form than ever, and not 
a few have carried the dinner knife to bed with them to suck dur- 
ing the long hours of the night, and have fallen asleep with the 
extreme end of the blade resting peacefully upon their tonsils. 

THERE is no evil wherein we cannot trace some apparent good. 
The town is infested with footpads. In every dusky corner 
the ruffians lurk, sand elubs in hand to whack the belated citi- 
zen over the head, and rob him of his valuables. And after they 
have skinned him to the last nickel those malignant scamps will 
curse him, and deal him a parting thump as a souvenir of the 
meeting. This is the evil, but the good is displayed in the num- 
ber of owlish men who once flew abroad until all hours, but now 
remain quietly at home with their family. It is surprising how 
infrequent lodge meetings are now, and how rarely society elec- 
tions call the good man away from his own fireside. For this rea- 
son the ladies are inclined to regard the footpad epidemic philo- 
sophically, considering that every man who is tapped on the 
skull and robbed, serves as a wholesome warning to the rest. 



MANY bftppy return* of the day- ah. indeed. 
All wh-> )oln Ihetr fond faith on the beautiful . ree.l. 

Tb«t this glob* we Inhabit, without woman'* gr:\> ■ 
The a*j ret tone-" «»f her \ ..;, ,.. the rare light Ol her face 
Would be a grim desert, a sad, lonesome way. 
Will wish - many happy returns of the day." 

Prom that hour whan the Bral Ini'hand saw at his ilde, 

In Bdan'a fair garden, his Ood-gWau brida t 

And pressed on her ripe lips the lint mortal's kiss, 

While his heart with love swelled — from that first hour to this, 

Heaven's greatest and beat gift to man in this life. 

Pro 01 its dawn to its close, is a much loving wife. 

The storm-clouds may gather, the thunder may roll, 
The tempest but gathers BOOl nearer to soul; 
Disasters may threaten, and hopes futile prove. 
All but strengthen the bondfl of this sanctified love; 
Down the long vale where sorrows and joys alternate, 
Now warm in the sunlight now smitten by fate, 
Now culling the rose, now plucking the weed. 
Now reaping the harvest, now marking the seed, 
Ferish ere its fruition — so long as true hearts 
Make love's mellow music — misfortune's grim darts, 
Though myriad, from love's trusty armor recoil, 
And care is o'ertbrown by a kiss and a smile. 

May the roses of life round thy path, friends of ours, 
Twine ever a garden of love's fadeless flowers 
From this mystical world, you've won its best prize — 
Affection unmeasured, and trust that ne'er dies; 
From the depths of our hearts, let us lovingly pray, 
That you see many happy returns of the day; 
And that this friendly circle who now bids you wear 
Love's undying garland, grown brighter each year, 
May again and again press your hands and renew 
Their wishes that peace dwell forever with you. 

THE truth must be acknowledged that we are not, as a rule, a 
polite people. We used to be, in the days of '49, when ladies 
were rare, and we delighted in a war dance around a woman's 
bonnet. Now the sex is plentiful, and we are losing that respect 
for them we formerly entertained. We no longer spring to our 
feet when a lady enters a car to give her a seat, unless, indeed, she 
should be unusually attractive. Alas! familiarity has bred con- 
tempt, and only a few of the old schoolfellows wear their po- 
liteness undiminished and good as new. When King Ivalakaua 
was buried on Thursday, as the hearse containing the body of the 
dead Monarch passed along the streets, of the hundreds who 
gazed upon the melancholy pageant not one in ninety-nine uncov- 
ered. The populace laughed and jested and seemed to think it by no 
means a bad show, and looked as if they would not mind having 
a King die once a week for the sake of such a pleasing, free mili- 
tary spectacle. In France the multitude uncover when the poor- 
est coffin goes by. We may be as moral as the French, which is 
doubtful, but we certainly are not as polite. 

THERE were busy times on the Charleston, preparing for the 
melancholy voyage to Honolulu. The officer of the deck 
paced up and down watching the provisions come aboard. Sud- 
denly, as a case was dumped roughly on the deck, the sailor 
awoke to sudden animation: "Be careful with those cases," he 
shouted; "look out what you are about, will you," and from the 
barbette he directed that those latest supplies be handled with the 
utmost tenderness. Alas! the beef, pork, crackers and poultry 
might take its chances in the most ardent crash, but the precious 
liquids which were to solace the mariner's heart must be protected 
though profanity should fall thick as leaves in Valambrosia. 



fR. 



well he is rather sensitive about the matter, so I 



IVi will omit his name, gave a little dinner party a few nights 
ago to a friend of his fresh from the old sod. This person is a 
horsey person, wears a bird's-eye necktie, and buttons as large as 
butter plates with horses' heads engraved thereon. Fish was 
served, and in the course of the repast, an omelette au rum was in- 
troduced. The bookmaker from the Irish turf opened his eyes as 
the waiter passed bim with the blazing dish. " Be jabers," he 
said, " that is the first time I ever saw salmon served at the end 
of a dinner, and it on fire, too." 

LADIES who have been divorced, when the ex-husband calls 
again and asks to have the knot re-tied, had better consent 
at once or array themselves in a stove metal corset, for the 
most singular mania for the shooting of divorced wives is raging 
throughout the length and breadth of the land. Two or three a 
week are not uncommon, and it is plain to any woman of sense 
that a disagreeable mate at one's side is better than an ounce of 
lead in the lungs. 

A YOUNG lady of this city who is of a most erratic tempera- 
ment, and when visiting her lady friends will stop all night 
upon the slightest hint of an invitation, has utilized that appar- 
ently useless portion of female apparel— the bustle. In hers she 
carries her tooth brush, camellineand manicure tools, so she is 
never, as the baseball men say, caught out. 



le 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Fl< ur. good home and foreign demaud: Extras $4.20@$4.30: Superfine, $3.00. 

Wheat, steady, good trade; Shipping, $1.37^; Milling, ?1.10(g)$1.4'2V 2 per ctl. 

Barley, in favor; Brewing, $1.50(§>$1 .60; Feed, $1.-I8@$l.y5 per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, $2.00<g)$.!.or.; Feed, $1.>0@$2.00 per ctl. 

Com, White, $1 35; Yellow, *I.3iHff?l-3'» per ctl. 

Kye. light stock, good demaud, fl.30@91.35. Cement, $2.75@3. 

Hay, free supply; Wheat, $13@*1S; Oats, $12@$14; Alfalfa, $11@$13.00. 

MUlstuffs, good demaud. Brau, $22@$23 per ton. 

Beaus, good request, $2.75@$3.40 per ctl. Potatoes, 80c. @$1 25 per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 36c.@38c. ; Fair, 25e.@30c; Pickled, 27' 2 c@30c. 

Cheese, light stock, 10c.@13c. Eggs, good supply, 26c.@28c. 

Honey, Comb, lie. @14c: Extracted, 5c.@6c. Poultry iu good supply. 

Ouious, $2.75@$3.25 per ctl. Beeswax is scarce at 20c.@25c. 

Fruit — all kinds dried — active. Fruit is very plentiful aud cheap. 

Raisins aud Dried Grapes in high favor at good paying rates. 

Hides are lower; Dry, 7c@9c. Wool is iu demaud at 12c.@24c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c.@6Vic. 

Ooffee steady at 20c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is less firm, with a declining tendency. Nuts find ready sale. 

Quicksilver, slow of sale at $51.00 per flask. Hops are held firmly, 32@37Vj,c. 

Sugar, good stocs of both Raws aud Refined. Steady prices. 

THE new British steamship Monowai arrived here on the morn- 
ing of the 18th inst., twenty-five days from Sydney and seven 
days from Hololulu, with passengers and government mail, and is 
consigned to J. D. Spreckels it Bros. She brings a light cargo 
from Sydney, say 158 bales Wool, 16 bales Sheep Skins, 34cks Pelts, 
247 drms Glycerine, 89G ingots Tin, 25 bags Kauri Gum, etc. This 
steamer belongs to the Union Steamship Company, and has the 
contract for carrying the British Government mails to and from 
the colonies. The Hawaiian steamer Zelandia came into port the 
day previous, twenty-four days from Sydney via Honolulu, yet 
having sailed from the colonies the same day as the former. Both 
steamers are consigned to J. D. Spreckels &■ Br.is.; the latter 
brought for cargo 676 bis Sydney Wool, 102 bis Sheetings, 59pkgs 
Machinery, etc., and from Honolulu 10,826 bags Sugar, 2,000 bchs 
Bananas. 

The local market is well supplied with apples, oranges, lemons, 
limes and other fruits; also for all kinds of vegetables. Business 
in imports is exceedingly quiet. Wheat and other grains find 
ready sale. Dairy products are coming forward more freely, and 
prices shade off. 

The Pacific Mail steamship San Bias, from the Isthmus, brought 
New York cargo of 894 pkgs Wares, 55 rolls Carpet, 280 pkgs 
Sheetings, Iron, etc. From Europe, 20 cs Cheese, 276 cs Oil, 300 
cs Soap, and 100 pkgs Mdse. From Central America, 1,944 bags 
Coffee, etc. From Mexico, 817 bxs Limes, 24 bxs Oranges, 52 
pkgs Pineapples, etc. 

The O. & O. steamship Oceanic, 26$- days from Hongkong, via 
Yokohama and Honolula, brought for cargo 26,786 mats Rice, 
1,083 pkgs Tea, 452 bags Spices, 171 pkgs Gambria, 1,811 bxs Mi- 
kado Oranges and 10,000 pks Chow-chow. En route for Eastern 
cities, to go overland, 708 pkgs Silk, 6,470 pkgs Tea, 570 pkgs 
Mdse, 247 pkgs Curios, etc. 

Exports for Hawaii for the period under review embrace the 
following leading items to Honolulu, per Emma Claudina: Two 
hundred forty-six thousand feet Shingles, 73,000 feet Lumber, 26,- 
340 feet Rolled Barley, 503 Railroad Ties, 600 sks. Feed, 2,263 sks. 
Bran and Mdse., value $14,000. To same, per S. N. Castle, 50,000 
lbs. Fertilizer, 3,500 lbs. Sugar, 26,000 lb3. Rolled Barley, 235 pkgs. 
Salmon, 750 bbls. Lime, 521 bales Hay and Mdse., value $18,537. 
The Planter, hence for Honolulu, had 200,000 lbs. Fertilizer. 17,- 
566 lbs. Rolled Barley, 90 bxs. Raisins, 1,626 bbls. Flour, 1,000 
sks. Bran, 843 bales Hay, 550 bbls. Lime, 3,800 Posts, 236 pkgs. 
Powder, etc., value $30,762. 

8tarr & Co. has dispatched for SHgo the Br. Ship Paso, of Bal- 
maha, with 22,300 bbls. Flour, 10,605 ctls. Wheat, value $100,350. 

From New York we have the ship Fred Billings, 135 days 
thence, with a full Cargo of general Mdse, 4,000 tons, Dutton and 
Beebe. 

Fruit shipments Eastward — green, dried and canned for the 
past year filled 11,868 cars, each 20,000 pounds and consisted of: 
Canned fruit, 829 cars; Dried fruit, 163; Raisins and Dried Grapes, 
231; total car loads, 1,223. In addition to this, 31 car loads of 
canned salmon were sent forward, all by the Southern Pacific 
Company. 

THE new underground, electric railway of London is three and 
one-quarter miles in length, and passes at a depth of sixty 
feet below the surface, through two circuular iron tunnels ten feet 
in diameter. It is equipped with fourteen ten-ton electric locomo- 
tives, each capable of developing 100 horse-power and of running 
twenty-five miles per hour. A train has three passenger carriages, 
each seating thirty-four persons. The construction of this under- 
ground line has occupied four years, and the cost has been 
$1,000,000 per mile. 

W. G. Badger, sole agent for Hallet, Davis & Co., W. W. Kimball 
& Co., celebrated pianos and organs, removed to History Building, 
725 Market street, ground floor. 



BJ^HSTIKS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,000,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 60 LOMBARD STREET, London. 

Branches— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver, Nanaimo and Kamloops. British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN — Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English u 8cottisn and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

THE REPUBLIC SAVINGS, BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Incorporated and acting under the laws of California. Charter granted 
for 50 years. Authorized to issue 250,000 shares — par value, $100. 

Capital Subscribed $4o0,000. 

A. H. MACDONALD, President. Da. CHARLES E. BLAKE, Vice-Pres't. 
Bank of British Columbia, Treasurer. 

San Francisco Office— 624 Market street. Oakland Office— 471 Ninth street. 
Certificates of Shares issued upon application, earning investor one per 
cent per month. All loans made on first-mortgage on real estate. Paid-up 
Stock investors respectfully solicited. Loans of $1,000 payable in monthly 
payments of $16. By-Laws, Prospectus and Circulars giveu upou application. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND S 1,540,000 00. 

Deposits January 2, 1891 24,340,988 65. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KKU8E ; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS : Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TODRNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, Chas. Melnecke, O. 
Schoemann, E. Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, M. Ehrmau. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbob. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Uuaranly 1'apltaJ, $l,OOO r OOO. 

OFFICEES. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Pnelan, James Momtt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Pnelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
securities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL (1,000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jb. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH Pbesident. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Peesidknt. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashieb. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. w. op. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $450,000. 
Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St., N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boule- 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Managers. 

C- Altschtjl, Cashier. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 1 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co?, 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, aud issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. FRED. F. LOW. i „„,.„„„ 

IGN. STEINHART.l managers. 
P. N. Liliekthal, Cashier. 



s 



Jan. 24. |S«>1. 



BAN FM VXCI8C0 



* I^Ss)*^ 



GIVE A KIND WORD WHEN YOU CAN 

Do you know * heart that hungers 

For * wonl of 1- . . and cbeer? 
There ire many such about us; 

It may he thai one is near. 
Ix>olc around you. If you find it 

Speak the word that's needed so, 
Ami your own heari may be Strengthened 

By the help that yon bestow. 

It may be that some one falters 

On the brink of sin and wrong, 
And a word from you might save hiiu — 

Help to make the tempted strong. 
Look about you. 0, my brother. 

What a sin is yours and mine 
If we see tbat help is needed 

And we give no friendly sign. 

Never think kind words are wasted, 

Bread on waters cast are they, 
And it may be we shall find them 

Coming back to us some day. 
Coming back when sorely needed, 

In a time of sbarp distress. 
8o, my friend, let's give them freely; 

<iift and giver God will bless. 



THE DEAD DEBUTANTE.— JJrooJWyH Eagle. 

Here in her dainty chamber 

On the snow white bed it lies — 
The dress that brought such a sparkle 

Of joy to her velvet eyes. 
A wonderful garment, fashioned 

Of yards upon yards of lace, 
With knots of silvery ribbons 

To fasten the folds in place. 

Go, lay it away forever, 

In the sweet, dead leaves of the rose, 
With the fan and the fairy slippers, 

The gloves and the silken hose; 
Tbe bodice, too, that was fitted 

To her girlish and graceful shape, 
And, heavy with frosty fringes, 

The long white opera cape. 

For Madge, she is done with dancing, 

And the pleasures and pains of life; 
No babe shall call ber mother, 

And no nian call her wife; 
For below in the darkened parlor, 

With her tender feet unshod, 
She lies on a couch of lilies, 

All dressed for the court of God. 



STRATEGY.— Munsey's Weekly. 



She promised to dance the cotillion with me, 

She promised me early last fall; 
The dance is to-morrow — but then, don't you see, 

We've quarreled and speak not at all. 

We quareled last night, and to-morrow's the dance, 

Confound it! Now what can I do? 
Shall I say naught about it — leave it to chance? 

Shall I send her the flowers — would you? 

Yes, I guess I will send her the flowers and see 

If she has forgotten it all. 
If she was in earnest they'll come back to me 

But then — she must give up the ball. 



A GIRL OF THE PERIOD.— Outing for January. 

She's not here, but her hat's on the mantel, 

Her glove on the table is thrown, 
And I think how oft it has covered 

The hand that I'd fain call myown. 
Shall I sit down and wait for her coming ? 

Or would it be better to go? 
And the glove — how I long to possess itl 

Have I courage to steal it? But no, 
I can't wear it concealed in my bosom. 

For, you see, it's a stiff boxing glove 1 
She goes in for all sorts of athletics, 

This rosy-cheeked maiden I love. 



NEWS I ETTER, 

r 



BANKS. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 



Capital 
Surplus 
Undivided Profits 



Tho«*h Brow*. 



J'llT Int. IWO) 
WM AXVORD, PrWldWl. 

Cuhlcr | B. Mntmr. Jr 



•S.00O.O00 00 

1,000.0:0 00 

2,091,568 78 
.AufiilA.nl Oaahlcr 



NFW YOKK-ApenoT of the Hank of c»!Horul». BOSTON-Tremonl 
National Bank. CHU i National Hank. ST LOUIS— Boatman '• 

Bauk; NEW ZEALAND— The Hank ol New Zealand. Cones] lent In 

London— Messrs. n m, Knthxehlld i s,, n - i ,.rr.-s|,,>ii.i.-ntr< In In.lla, China, 
.!hi>hii mi,! Australia. 

The Bauk has Ageuctcs at Virginia City, am] Correspondent! in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Inu-rinr Town* ol the I'ariflr Coast. 

Letter* of Cn-.iil i.sued, available In all parts of the world. Draw direct 
ou New Vork, Boston, Chicago, St. l.oula, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, Perls, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort nu-the Msm, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italv and Switzerland. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



IV. W. Corner Saiuome and I1ii.hu Street.*.. 

Established 1870. U 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 I UNDIVIDED PROFITS $69,200 

S. G. MURPHY President! E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT... Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

DIRECTORS i 
Geo. A. Low, George C. Perklus, 8. G. Murphy, 

N. Vau Bergen, James D. Phelau, James Moffitt, 

Jas. H. Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A Oeneral Hanking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for Hie care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A speendty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. M. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 



Authorized Capital. 
Reserve 



.$3,600,000 I 



Capital paid up 2,450,000 

' 345,000 



San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St., E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1005 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV ERIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY, 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: Chas. Main, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. Johnson, 
C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. Loudon— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Ccr. of Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Savings Bauk deposits received, and Interest paid on same semi annually, 
in January and July. Rates of interest for the LastThree Terms: 5.58 per 
cent on term deposit and 4.65 per cent on ordinary deposits, free of tax. 
Deposits received from one dollar upwards. Open Saturday Evenings. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS DIRECT 6 RS: $5,000,000.00 

Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadswortn, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues LetterB of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 1 8 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24,1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretaey 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 



IF an auction sale be a sale at which the property offered is sold 
to the highest bidder, then the sale conducted by the firni of 
Tevis & Fisher during the week, and advertised as an auction, is 
not such a one. For that sale there was advertised a list of the 
property to be disposed of " at auction," which would, of course, 
mean to the buyer offering the highest price. And yet when the 
buyers, in response to that advertisement, attended the sale and 
made their bids, they found that they could not purchase at the 
prices bid at all, but, on the contrary, found that the property 
could not be purchased at all, unless they gave such a price as the 
owners demanded. Accordingly, this was not an auction at all, 
but simply a test, instituted for the purpose of ascertaining 
whether or not any one was willing to pay the prices demanded. 
Now of course no one can, nor does any one desire to prevent the 
firm in question, or any other firm, from having tests of this kind. 
That way of business generally mires itself in a very short time. 
But, nevertheless, it is manifestly unfair to draw to a sale a large 
number of people on the representation that certain .property is 
to be auctioned off when nothing of the kind is intended. At 
this sale of Tevis & Fisher every property advertised was put up, 
and was subject to a limit, and not a piece was sold, the bids not 
coming up to the limits imposed. The very least that should be 
done in such case, is to advertise the limit placed upon the prop- 
erty, so that people will not be made to leave their business and 
occupations, and waste their time by attempting to buy that 
which is really not for sale. 

Just what will be the outcome of the cross purposes existing 
between the Board of Supervisors and various street widening 
and extension commissions it is hard to foresee. So far it would 
seem that there will be a pile of expense put upon some one, and 
if the property owners escape they may count themselves lucky. 
To be sure the Commissioners appointed during the last days of 
the Solid Nine regime are not entitled to any consideration, and 
if they can be ousted no one ought to regret that event. 

John W. Mackay has leased to the Nevada Bank the premises 
at present occupied by that corporation for the snug rental of 
$1,000 a month, the term being for five years. 

If there bo any change in the affairs of the market during the 
current week it is a subsidence of the activity which has ruled in 
outside lands. The records do not show so many sales. It may, 
however.be but a temporary lull, brought about by some acci- 
dental combination of circumstances, and to be followed by a 
more active market. On the other hand, the market has shown 
promising signs of greater activity in other directions, Down 
town and choice residence property have received increased at- 
tention, and though sales have not in all cases resulted, the situa- 
tion promises well for the future. 

Among the noteworthy transfers of the week were 30x120 feet 
on the south side of Sacramento street, 98:9 feet west of Davis, 
$25,000; 22:11x65 on the north side of Sutter street, 45:10 feet 
east of Jones; 30x137:6 on the north side of Turk street, 75 feet 
west of Mason, joining 75x75 on the west side of Mason street, 
62:6 feet north of Turk street, sold by Mrs. Hopkins-Searles; 
50x115 (irregular) on the south side of Market street, 310 feet 
east of Noe; 25x116 on the north side of Market street, 293:4 feet 
east of Castro street and 36x80 on the southwest corner of Twelfth 
and Harrison streets. 

The principal sales in residence properties were 91:2x137:6 on 
the southeast corner of Oak and Lyon streets; 48x108 on the 
northwest corner of Van Ness and Locust Avenues; 25x151:6 on 
the north side of California street, 106:3 feet west of Polk; 64:2x 
137:6 on the east side of Franklin street, 63:6 feet north of Clay; 
56x137 :6 on the north side of Pine street, 137 :6 feet west of Frank- 
lin, $12,880; 125x127:8 on the south side Jackson street, 110 feet 
west of Gough; 30x120 on the south side of Geary street, 90 feet 
east of Franklin, $7,500, and 36x87:6 on the south side of Califor- 
nia street, 81 feet east of Fillmore, $8,500. 

The oft-mooted project of establishing the Sausalito ferry land- 
ings at North Beach, which has lately been*revived, is not likely 
to be carried to a successful issue, unless its promoters take care 
to provide proper street railroad facilities to the center of the city, 
as well as to the Mission and Western Addition. Nothing but a 
modern system, which means cable, and not horses, and one fare 
to any section of the city, can ever make successful competition to 
the old lines. But with facilities of that kind provided, the ferry 
would be an assured success. And as for its effect on North Beach 
property, it would cast in the shade every other movement in real 
estate which has occurred in San Francisco for the last twenty 
years. Really, the North Beach people ought to agitate the scheme. 

Mr. E. Avery McCarthy was seen at 624 Market street, in rela- 
tion to the recent San Miguel Ranch purchase, and made the 
following statement regarding progress of work: " We are now 
making surveys and preliminary arrangements, necessary before 
actual improvements are made, and inside of two weeks expect 
that work will be commenced upon the 200-acre portion — the 
most southerly part of the tract — to put the same in shape for 
the market." 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street. San Francisco, California. 

NATIONAL ASSURANCE CO. OF IRELAND; 
ATLAS ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON ; 
BOYLSTON INSURANCE CO. OF BOSTON ; 
OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

AgentB for — 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship I The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

Company, i (L'd.), 

"The California Line of Clippers," The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

from New York, | steel Rails and Track Material. 

" The Hawaiian Line of Packets," | 

Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, hy the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER I 

..Over 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 26 to 50 per cent in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth'e Centri 
f ugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 

327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Franeiseo. 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

g&~ Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 

Tha "Standard" M chine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 

Chamber/in Patents, 

J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST FOR 

American Rubber Co.'s Celebrated Rubber Boots and Shoes, 

HEAVY 

Gossamer, Mackintosh and Oil Clothing, 

2 and 4 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OILS AND 8UPPLIE8. 

THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

GIANT POWDER OR DYNAMITE, NOBEL'S GELATINE, GELATINE 

DYNAMITE of various grades, JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED, 

BLACK BLASTING POWDER, CAPS AND FUSE. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., - - - General Agents 

30 California Street. 



Arthur W. Moore. 



Harry F. Woods. 
Member Stock and Bond Exchange. 



WOODS & MOORE, 
STOCK AND BOND BROKERS, 



Investment securities of all kinds bought and sold on commission. Lib- 
eral advances made on approved securities. Stocks carried on margin. 

No. 438 California Street, S. F. 



Jan 24, 1891. 



S.W FRANCI8C0 NEWS T BTTER. 



19 



THE BOURSE AND UNDERWRITER. 

ST«rT, January 24,1891. 

AS moM of tbr company statrmrni* aft completed, it Ii becom- 
ing poMfbSfl to approximate with a reasonable degree of ac* 
curacy the condition .«f affairs as shown by the bonk?. Prom 
all accounts it is evident that none «<f the companies have very 
much to boast of, though they may, with considerable satisfne- 
• ngratulate theniM-lve* that their lOMM were not heavier. 
The /' lenient announces that the tidal fire 

risks written in 1880 in this State, by the 150 companies repre- 
sented in California, wu | Of Ibtfl BUtn $86,206,605 
was written by the original companies, $138,638,528 by the out- 
side companies, and 1169 th« foreign companies. In 
ISM) the volume of business for the State was $ BOS, or $16- 
330,783 ten than last year, while in 18S0 the total risks written 
amounted to 8852,178,680, or 1116,431,836 less than in 1890. 

These figures include the losses of eleven California companies, 
the Alia Fire. Anglo-Nevada, California, Commercial, Fireman's 
Fund, Home Mutual, Oakland Home, Southern California, State 
Investment. Sun and Tnion. These companies wrote risks on 
$88,206,605, on which they received premiums of $1,480,763.35. 
The losses paid were $589,687.44, a ratio to the premiums of 39.9. 
The gross premiums that the foreign companies obtained in the 
8tate were $2,563,038.95 on a business of $153,866,232. Their 
losses amounted to $1,162,289.12, a ratio of 45.3 to the premiums. 
Companies from other States wrote risks in California amounting 
to $128,538,528. on which there were premiums amounting to 
1,521.75. These companies paid losses amounting to $1,001,- 
415.66, a ratio of 44.3 to the premiums. The returns of the Ma- 
rine business for 1890 are as follows: The total risks written by 
California companies were $19,703,243 and by foreign companies 
doing business in the State $114,725,841, a grand total of $134,- 
429,084. On this amount of business the gross premiums were 
for California companies, $305,543.58; for foreign companies, $1,- 
130,910.37, a total of $1',526,453. The total marine losses for the 
State were $1,109,430, of which the California companies bore 
$205,826.86 and the foreign ones $903,604,78, making the loss ratio 
of the former 52 per cent, and of the latter 79.9 per cent., or an 
average loss ratio of 72.7. 

The total fire premiums for the State were $6,303,324, or about 
$140,000 more than in 1889, while the loss ratio for 1890 was 43.7, 
that of the previous year being 41.7. In 1880 the premiums re- 
ceived amounted to $3,620,267, and the loss ratio was 32.5. 

The ratio of fire losses to premiums in 1890 were exceeded dur- 
ing the last twenty years in only four years — in 1871, when the 
ratio was 77; in 1885, when it was 44.7; in 1886, when it was 
51.2, and in 1888, when it was 50. The marine losses in 1890 
were the highest in proportion to premiums for several years 
past. 

At their annual meeting last week, the stockholders of the 
Fireman's Fund elected the following Directors: John 0. Earl, 
Thomas S. Chard, John Barton, W. H. Brown, John H. Gardiner, 
F. W. Lougee, John T. Wright, A. A. Smith, W. W. Stow, D. J. 
Staples and W. J. Dutton. The Board subsequently met and 
organized, electing the following officers: D. J. Staples, President; 
W. J. Dutton, Vice President; Bernard Faymonville, Secretary; 
George H. Tyson, Assistant Secretary, and J. B. Levison, Marine 
Secretary. 

Eppstein & Thompson, formerly with the Anglo Nevada, have 
been appointed city agents to the North British & Mercantile. 

R. J. Tyson has been appointed special agent of the Firemen's 
Fund. 

The Deanfield has been posted at the Lloyds as missing, and the 
losses for her have been paid. The Malaysia will, probably, soon 
be posted also. Chances for the Glenfinnet are now considered very 
dubious. Eighty-five per cent, is now being paid on her. The 
Glenbroch, which arrived in port a few days ago, left three weeks 
after the Glenfinnet from the same port. Secretary. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



A New Savings Bank.— The California Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, with paid up capital of $1,000,000, corner of Montgomery 
and California streets, has established a Savings Department in con- 
nection with their business, and are inviting savings accounts from 
all classes of our citizens. They expect to pay as large a rate of in- 
terest, if not larger, than any savings institution in the city. This 
company accords to depositors a guarantee of 307 per cent., which is 
very much larger than that accorded by any other like institution on 
the Pacific Coast. Call or write for prospectus. 

PoisoN-OAKcured by Steele'sGrindelia Lotion. Twenty years 'experience 
has proved this remedy to be a, specific. Apply immediately after returning 
fromapicnicexcursiou.andthe dread eruption will be prevented. James 
G.Steele & Co., 635 M»rketitreet. 

Have you seen Lakeview since the improvements? It is advanc- 
ing rapidly. Buy Lakeview lots for homes, for investment. 

New stylesof scarfs, shirtings, gloves, etc., of the first quality for 
sale by J. W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. 

J. F. Cotter's Old Boorbon. —This celebrated Whisky is for sale by al 
druggisteand first-class grocers. Trade mark— star within ashield. 

Compound Lenses of every possible combination mounted in two hours 
notice by C. Muller, optician, 135 Montgomery street. 



Hala -livi-r Mining < 

Ideation of principal pit. . rruolno, Call form* ft, i>.™ 

***** Vl '' i «.|« 

Iron ihHi »t * - icclliu .>( llic hoar. I ..( i nrntft'i hold 
■ wnlli .ln> ..f January. 1WI. ah **•< --m.-nt (Nn y7) ol Klfi 

w) per tbaro *rai thr .Hi. uai rtock ol the corporation 

payable Immediately. In rutted state* gnhi 00 1 0. to the Secretary Hi the 
»"»<** -*f ' Nevada Block, Ho SOB Montgomery ttreol 

Ban Pranclaoo, California. 

Any ■took DDOD « nloh thla UMUOtftfll shall remain unprti.] 00 

Wednesday, the Eleventh da, ol Febniirf. 1891. wilt be delinquent. 
ami advertised for wale at pubHoeaeUoD: an.i anient Daymen) is made bt> 

fore, will be Mid on \\ ! DNE8DAV, the fourth day nf March Ih'H In 
pay the delinquent aMeumout, together »ith ooatf of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Hoard ol Trustees. 

„ „ A B. I HOMP80N, Secretary. 

OFFICB—Room No. 58, Nevada Block, No. SOS Montgomery street, Ban Fran 
Clsco, C alifornia. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Kentuck Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— 8an Fraucisco, California Lo- 
cation of works— Qold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a* meeting of the Hoard of Directors held 
onthe'29thdayof December, 1890, an assessment (No. 2;t) of Thirty-five Ceuts 
(35c) per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately iu United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Couipauy, No. 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, Ban Fraucisco, Cal. 

A-uy stock upon which this n.ssessmvut shall remain unpaid on the 
Third Day of February 1891, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment Is made 
before, will be sold on Wednesday, the twenty-fifth day of February, 1891, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street. Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Del Monte Mining Company. 

Location of priucipal place of business— San Fraucisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Tuscarorn, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the fifth day of January, 1891, an assessment (No. 4) of Twenty (20) Ceuts 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, No. 310 Pine street, room* 15 aud 17, 8au Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Ninth Day of February, 1891, will be delinquent, 
aud advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold ou TUESDAY, the third day of March. 1891, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 aud 17, San Fraucisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Midas Gold Mining Company. 

Location of priucipal place of business— San Fraucisco, California. Lo- 
cation of work.-,— Sierra County, California. 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
ou the thirteenth day of January, 1891, an assessment (No. 1) of Twenty 
Ceuts per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office 
of the Company, room 7, No. 328 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Mond.y, the 23d day of March, 1891. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the twenty-third day of March, 1891. to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

ABRAHAM HALSEY, Secretary. 

Office— Room 7, No. 328 Montgomery street, Sac Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 98 

Amount per Share 30 Cents 

Levied January 2, 1891 

Delinquent in Office February5, 1891 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock February 24, 1891 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, 
California. , 

GEO. EASTON & CO., 

313 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 
,"ca.:r,t:e slj^istciiei." 

'& > r77$*\^tm& (WHITE LABEL) 

* jn 5E3l A Mn K nifi ceut Rich Wine. 

Vr^&MtB^ "o-E^isriD viisr sec," 

l* * v^Jira^ (BROWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 
See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




- -/n 



wenn&G&ftse&a, 



THE South is the most heavily wooded section of the States 
containing 196,832,000 acres in the entire country. The most, 
heavily timbered State in the North, it is said, has a smaller per- 
centage of wooded area than has the lightest wooded State in the 
South. Southern timber is useful for all purposes. Pine, cypress, 
poplar and ash are widely distributed. The total value of lumber, 
shingles and other forest products turned out in 1890 is estimated 
at $102,122,100, against the census estimate of $46,970,000 in 1880. 
Arkansas is the largest lumber-producing State of the South. The 
average price paid for Southern pine lands at the beginning of the 
boom was $1.25. The present estimated value is $10 per acre, a 
heavy gain in less than ten years. 

Observations at Berlin, Strasburg, Prague and other places 

have been reported as showing a decrease in the latitude of Cen- 
tral Europe. This implies that a shifting of the earth's axis is in 
progress, for the six months ending with February, 1890, the 
amount of decrease was half a second, which would be quite a 
serious rate of alteration if steadily continued. According to Prof. 
Alfred Kirchoff, however, the observations for the half-year ending 
with August, 1890, show an opposite change — or increase — in 
Berlin's latitude. The movement, therefore, appears to be a mi- 
nute oscillation of the axis, which is probably produced by some 
changes in the internal mass of our planet. It was lately pointed 
out that a heaping up of the sea to the extent of 500 cubic miles 
would give a perceptible vibration, and an ice accumulation might 
have a like effect. 

Almost in the exact geographical centre of Wyoming is a 

mountain of solid hematite iron ore, with GOO feet of it above 
ground, more than a mile wide and over two miles in length. Be- 
sides the iron the mountain contains a bed of lignite coal large 
enough to warm the entire world for a century, a dozen dried-up 
lakes of soda, where the suda is deposited to a depth of over 300 
feet, some of the lakes being over 600 acres in extent. In a moun- 
tain adjoining there is apetroleum basin larger than those of Penn- 
sylvania and West Virginia combined. Out of some of the springs 
pure rectified coal oil is trickling at the rate of twenty to thirty 
barrels per day. 

Sir William Thompson demonstrates the solidity of the 

earth by rotating two eggs, one raw and the other cooked, sus- 
pended by steel threads. The cooked egg behaves like any solid 
body, and continues to move foralong time; but the raw egg soon 
comes to a stop, because the shell only was put in motion, and the 
friction of the matter of the egg soon overcomes the impulse. From 
this it appears that the earth can not consist of a thin, solid crust 
containing a liquid or pasty nucleus, such constitution being par- 
ticularly incompatible with the movement of the terrestrial axis 
corresponding to the procession of the equinoxes. 

Measurements of the Sun's distance by the methods of dif- 
ferent periods in astronomical science have given these results: 
Hipparcus, 150 B. C, found it to be 5,900,000 miles; Posidonius, 
100 B.C., 62,750,000 miles; Copernicus, 1543 A. D., 4,700,000; Kep- 
ler, 1628, 13,500,000 miles; Wendlin, 1640 58,600,000 miles; Ric- 
coli, 1650, 29,200,000 miles; Cassini, 1080,86,000,000 miles; Lahire, 
1687, 136,000,000; Laplace, 1799, 92,800,000; Encke, 1824, 95,250,- 
000; and recent estimates make it 92,890,000 miles. 

Coal abounds in almost inexhaustible quantities in Wash- 
ington. This year alone the product is estimated to be nearly 
2,000,000 tons, valued at over $7,000,000. The industry of mining 
gives employment to thousands of men and brings a large revenue 
into the State. Coal is found in sixteen counties and new discov- 
eries are being made every day. 

— Surgical science has not only pared down over-long noses, 
but has succeeded in remedying disagreeable prominence of the 
ears. In a recent case, an oval piece of skin was removed from 
the back of the ear, a vertical notch cut m the cartilage, and the 
wound closed by a few stitches. The ear was held closer to the 
head, and no visible scar was left. 

— The following is the record of the fastest mile a single man 
has thus far traveled by the various methods of locomotion: Swim- 
ming, 26.32; walking, 6.23; snow-shoes, 5.39$; rowing, 5.01; run- 
ning, 4.124; tricycle, 2.49 2-5; bicycle, 2.29 4-5; skating, 2.12 3-5; 
trotting horse, 2.08$; running horse, 1,39 J; railroad train, 40£ 
seconds. 

On the 15th of February greater facilities for talking will 

be given to the world than they have ever possessed before. For 
twenty francs in Paris, and the equivalent money in London, they 
will be able to talk, for rive minutes, from one capital to the other, 
by means of the telephone. 

Cuneiform tablets lately deciphered prove to be among the ear- 
liest astronomical records known, giving a minute account of 
Chaldean observations of the moon and the planets for the year 
522 B. C. 



IZN-STJZEfcj^ICsrCIE- 



Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibit 
HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

276 Sansome Street, S. F. 
INCORPORATED A. D. 1864. 

Losses p'd since organi'n.?3,033,420.31 I Reinsurance Reserve \ 251.182.68 

Assets January 1, 18yo . 821, 517.09 Capital paid up, Gold . . 300,000 00 
Surplus for policyholders 810,567.09 | Net Surplus over ev'yth'g 244,884.41 

Income in 1889 5389.971.75 | Fire Losses paid in 1889. 1192,375.28 

Fire Losses unpaid, January 1, 1890 10,359.00 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. ...J. L. N. SHEPAKD I General Agent R. H. MAGILL 



COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 
p'ibb .adstid iMZA-KjasriE. 



CAPITAL, Paid In Full 

ASSETS, December 31. 1889 

LOSSES Paid in 18 Years (Since Organization)... 

JOHN H 



J 200.000.00 

406,003.99 

. 2,463,080.77 



WISE. President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building), San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBUR6. 

Capital $1,600,000.00 

Net surplus 389,266.70 

Assets January 1, 1890 1,611,557.70 

Invested in U. S 617,406.73 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

MaW" General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve rund (in addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764.876 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

■WIVE. ]VCA.CID01Jr^.IiID. 

GENERAL AGENT, 

315 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital. 5,000,000 Francs. 
TheBe three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street. San Francisco. 

THE PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1868. 
LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE. 

Principal Office, 418 California Street, San Francisco- 
Assets, January 1st, 1800.. $2,150,000.00 

Surplus 314,000.00 

Paid Policyholders In twenty years. 4,400,000.00 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco- 

COKE— CHEAPEST FUEL! 

Reduction in Price. 

Wliolesale (50 bbls. or more), 80c per bbl. Retail (any quantity 
antler 50 bbls.), 90c. per bbl. 

AT THE WORKS OF 

THE SAN FRANCISCO GASLIGHT COMPANY, 
HOWARD AND FIRST STS., and FOOT OF SECOND STREET. 



Jan 



SAN FRANCIS! NEWS ! I TTKK. 



21 




5UNICVMS 




W 



E'RE a wonderful p«oplo, hut can't yet boaM 
making, do matter how banl wo try, 
lar-buUon thai woi 
Or ihoestrings that will not untie. 
But these will come, we ere not afraid. 

■ rin, our efforts crown, 
And windows for cara will then be made 

That will go either up or down. —OapeOod ttcm. 

"And now, children," remarked Prof. Balnea in one of the 

schools the other day, 'if a family consulting of father and 
mother and seven children should bare a pie for dinner, how much 
would each one reoetTe?" "An eighth part," answered a bright 
boy. "Bui there are nine persons, you must remember." "Oh, 
know that, bat the mother wouldn't pet any. There wouldn't 
be enough to go around." Moments. 

• Are these m ickerel quite fresh? " asked a lady of a ragged, 

but pompons old colored fish-peddler who came to her door. "Oh 
yes, lady, puttie kly so, puffickly so! " was the reply. " Jess nostrilize 
them and see." " Kostrilise them ' What do you mean by that?" 
" Why, lady." said the peddler, with a look indicative of pity for her 
ignorance, " smell 'em ! smell 'em ! " 

— — " This world is pretty evenly divided after all," said the butcher, 
as he scraped away at his block. "How?" "Lady in thediamondsand 
sealskin eels out of her carriage, and comes in here and inquires for 
'sasaage. " "Well?" '"Well, other folks has the money, and us 
butchers the eddication. Makes rue feel more content." 

— Detroit Free Press. 

In the first years of wedlock the husband is tond 

Of his wife, whom he praises and pets; 
But he sometimes grows careless, and if she's a blonde 
He is constantly praising brunettes! 
■ " My dear sir. you have traveled in Africa. Do the African 
ladies >uffer as much as we from the tyranny of man ?" " Oh, no, 
the ladies have special privileges—" '' How I long to be there !" 
■• As I was going to say, at all the banquets the lady captives are 
always first eaten." 

Mr, Tangle — Maria, I'm going to make it warm for you. 

Mrs, Tangle— You are a perfect brute! I shall go right back to 
mother's — 

Mr. Tangle— Now, don't be too hasty, my dear. I'm going to buy 
you a sealskin sacque. — Light. " 

-■ ■ Mrs. Novcau- Marie— \X 'hat's the trouble now, Mary? 
Afarv— Sure an' there's thrubble enough. Mem. Here we do be 
with company for tay, an' nary a bit o' bread in the house. 
Mr*. Noveatt~Marie — Oh, well* never mind. Make some toast. 

— Puck. 
•^— f'fficer :— Have you any means of support? 
Newly-arrived Immigrant: — I don't quite understand you. 
I • a ■' .--Have you any profession by which you can make a living? 
A. A. I.: — No, sir. I'm an artist. — Life. 

Mr, Pine (of Nev> York)— I feel rather embarrassed, as the sub- 
ject I am going to speak of is ratber delicate. 

Miss Porcu'(from Chicago) — Oh, don't let that embarrass you! To 
tell the truth I am very fond of delicacies. 

■ " My modest, matchless Madeline! 

Mark my melodious midnight moans; 
Much may my melting music mean — 
My modulated monotones." 

A certain gentleman, boarding at one of our hotels, asked the 

waitress for a third glass of milk, to which she replied: " Had I 
known you had never been weaned I would have brought in the 
cow." Say, Kitty, that was a little rough on him. 

— Petrolia Advertiser. 

— Crimsonbeak (entering stationery store) — Do you keep New Year's 
resolutions here? Clerk— No, sir, we do not. Crimsonbeak — Do you 
know where I could get them? Clerk— Really, I don't know any one 
who keeps them. — Yonkers Statesman. 

A Debutante's View: Pauline—" So they're to be married 

this month?" Perdita— " Yes." Pauline— " What fools!" Perdita— 
"Why?" Pauline— "To spoil a whole winter of fun for a few wed- 
ding presents." 

Watts — Do you think education really assists a woman in get- 
ting a husband? Potts — Of course it does. Did you ever know a 
widow to remain unmarried any longer than she chose? 

— Indianapolis Journal. 

There is no accounting for taste. The Chicago girl, for in- 
stance, just gets as much, enjoyment out of a simple kiss as her Bos- 
ton sister from inter-labial communication. — Washington Hatchet. 

i Clothes sometimes make the man ; but a man cannot very well 
shine in society if his dress coat shines in society. 

Clara— Oh, I have so much to say to you. Maude— And I to 

you. Let's go to the opera to-night. 

The California Italian Paste Company, consisting of Messrs. 
Polastri & Splivalo, have brought to perfection the manufacture of 
Italian Pastes, Vermicelli, Maccaroni, Farina, etc. These are such 
articles of necessity in every household for the making of puddings, 
soups and every day dishes of various kinds as to render it desirable 
for housekeepers to obtain the very best, such as manufactured by 
Messrs. C. R. Splivalo & Co., 321 Sacramento Street. 



CAPITAL. 



[IREMA^ FUH.Q 

Insurance Company. 
11.000.000. | ASSETS 



•2.660.000. 



D. J. STAPLES 1'rckMiiil. 

William j. DDTTOM Vice-President 

B. faymonvili B .Secretary. 
OBOEOo H. TYSON . . . A«t Seorelarj 
J. U, lkvison ........ . Marine Secretary. 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout ihc United States. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

(ESTABLISHED 1871.) 
FIEB J^ISTXD IMIA-ZRIZDnTIE- 

CAP1TAL STOCK Paid Up 1400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SAN80ME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
GEORGE L. BRANDER, CHAS. H. CU8HING, P. J. WHITE, 

Presideut. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board or Dibe orb— D. CaUaghau, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. <* ddstein, L. Cunuingham, M. Kane, Kisher Ames, Dr. 

C. F. Buckley, Dr. i ra. Jones, G. II. Wheatou, T. McMulliu, H. H. WatBOn, 
H. Dimond, P. Bols 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London | Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.] 
Connecticut F're Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

N. w. Cor. Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 



The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 

CAPITAL AND ASSETS 54,694,983 00 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 

ASSETS , 10,581,953 00 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford. 

ASSETS 2,443,987 33 

GEO. D. DORNIN, Manager. WM. SEXTON, Assistant Mauager. 

314 Sansome Street. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL 510,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. S . . 5746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $30,000,000 | CASH ASSETS 516,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Co/. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

THE LANCASHIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
GEORGE STEWART. - - - General Manager. 

Guaranteed Capital $15,000,000 00 

Assets 7,802,366 69 

All information in regard to the Company may be obtained from 
MANN & WILSON, 
General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL 55,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
Wo. 316 Calllornia Street. San Francisco . 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets. $19,724,538.45. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 




318 C- flL l FoBN " , - § T - 



m -^Company?* *• 




s^&S:; ^ 



'^SS^SSS" ^ 



Jan 



S\\ YW \\« [S< NEWS I RTTER 






HA 

WII 1 1. K strolling lebnrely along k-drny itreet one fine after- 
list wrric. looking at lh« remain of ihe Xm ai 
which <tdl lingered unsold la manj I the ISDN window*, I met 
i man whose fire teenmi alrangcly familiar to me. Ho paused 
a« if to speak — our eyes met — and though for a moment I could 
not remember bis name or where I hail seen him, I Instinct! Tel J 
•it my baml. H- md simply said : ■ Hello, old 

fellow : How nre y 

It then flashed through my mini that it was Henry Brereton, 
an old schoolmate of mine, whom I had not seen for many a long 
year. 

In a few minutes we were both M borne with each other, and 
nothing would do but I must go up to his rooms at the Palace, 
and have a chat about old times over a bottle of "fll" and a 
good cigar. 

After we had run over our old schooldays, with their half-faded 
memories of escapades we hail shared, I asked Brereton what he 
bad been doing all these years, and what brought him to San 
Francisco. 

We replenished our glasses, lit fresh cigars, and Brereton said: 
o If I shan't bore yoo, old fellow, I'll give you a sketch of my 
life since we parted in — let me see — I think it was 1865. 
Brereton's Story. 

" Well, you know I always had a taste for the army. I cram- 
med and missed a day at exam. Of course I came out at the 
bottom of the list — plucked — and determined to try Australia. I 
consulted a lawyer friend of mine, and he managed to raise me 
five hundred pounds on my futnre prospects. 

•■ My sudden determination and ability to * raise the wind* some- 
what astonished the folks at home, but tbey accepted the inevi- 
table with a decent show of amiability, and off I went. After a 
pleasant voyage of some seventy and odd days I landed in 
Sydney. I stayed three months in Sydney, and having pro- 
cured a position as 'Colonial Experiencer' on a large cat- 
tle station on the Maquarrie river, I bought a horse and outfit, 
and started for the bush. We led a jolly, rollicking life, having 
lots of bard work and lots of fun. 

o I had been on the station about six months, when one of our 
stockmen broke his neck, and I was given his place. It 
was an outlying station, some twelve miles from the head 
station, and somewhat lonely. Near my hut a lot of blacks 
were camped, fishing and killing 'possums, and I had often no- 
ticed a wonderfully pretty half-caste girl with them, aged about 
sixteen. She had a perfect form, which showed to full advantage 
in the water — bathing gown3 or dresses not being en regie up 
there, with the thermometer 110° in the shade. 

" The girl, whose name was Eenaweena, spoke very passable 
English, and took quite a fancy to me. I asked her if she would 
come and cook and milk the cows for me, but she seemed fright- 
ened at the idea, and referred me to her mother— a fat old woman 
as black as a coal and decidedly dirty. 

"After a great deal of talking she finally consented to come. I 
soon began to take a great interest in the pretty half-caste, and I 
taught her to read, write and play the banjo. 

"For two years we led this primitive kind of existence, not see- 
ing a strange face once in a month, when I got a telegram from 
England, telling me that my step-father was dead, and asking me 
to hurry home at once. My poor little Eena (as I called her for 
short) was in a dreadful state of mind when I told her that 1 
must leave her for six months or so. To tell you the truth, old 
boy, we had both got very spooney. I took Eena to Dubbo one 
day, and there we were married by a magistrate. 

"I made arrangements before I left for Eena to stay until my 
return with a shepherd and his wife, decent people, who had al- 
ways been most kind to both of us, and after a tearful farewell 
and a promise to return in ltss than a year, we parted. Alasl 
Never, as it turned out, to see each other again, for just as I was 
on the point of returning, having settled all my affairs, and decided 
to settle in Australia, I got a letter, telling me that Eena had died in 
giving birth to a little girl baby, three months after I left. I at once 
sent out $500 to the superintendent of the station I bad been on, 
asking him to see that Eenaweena had a decent headstone over 
her grave, and also to look after the little girl. I got a letter soon 
after to say that a Mr. Christie and his wife, a childless couple, 
who owned half the cattle and sheep for miles around, wanted to 
adopt the child, and asking my permission to do so. It was readily 
given, and as I had now changed my mind about going back to 
Australia, I started to enjoy life at home on my income, which 
had now been swelled to $15,000 a year. 

oiled the usual life of a clubman, and in the busy whirl of hunt- 
ing, shooting, attending races, riding and racing a few platers of 
my own, I blush to say that in a few years nearly all thoughts of 
Eenaweena and her child passed from my mind. Until a few 
years ago fortune smiled upon me. Not contented with the hum- 
drum gambling at home, I played at Homburg, Baden-Baden and 
Spa. Sometimes I won, but latterly I lost, and was not at all 
sorry when the rooms were all closed, and Monaco alone was left. 

11 Last year I was invited by a friend to join him in a yachting 
cruise in the Mediterranean. Of course, we visited Nice, and be- 
ing at Nice, had to 'do' Monte Carlo. Here the old gambling 



spirit r*tam< . ., n ,i j pl flV ed heavily, tunaJW 

at ■ trrntr et quar ant. ,| y f ,; r 

four days, having loai more than savon thousand pounds, which 
I draw 1 checks f..r [ could illy atlord to lose so much, as It 
drained my capital, and on the fifth night I WM pacing the bal- 
cony fa- ink* the sea In .i gloomj and despondent mood, « ondarlng, 
«t ti"i- rae really worth the living, when Beymour, my 

friend, came smiling op to me. « Don* I look so glum, old man, 1 
he said. • Jual come into | , traliat) 

Queen,' as they i .ill her, play. She ha* nearly broken the hunk, 
and i* playing up to the Mmit ■ he makes.' 

i change, for I was gettlnutfmoal frightened of myself, 

I mechanically followed him into the crowded casino, where the 

deadly roulette balls were rattling along on their ruin-dealing 

i ronnds. There, surrounded by a crowd of both sexes, Bat a tall 

: girl, with jet-black hair, deep blue eyes, clear-cut features of the 

pure Grecian type. Her complexion was a rich olive. 

o > There,' said Seymour, ■ Is the 'Australian Queen.' She is said 
to be immensely rich and is still unmarried. There's a chance for 
you, my lad.' 

"Just as he spoke the 'Queen ' won a large stake on the double 
zero, and an elderly lady, who was evidently her chaperon, quietly 
pulled her sleeve, and said: 'Nina, dear, it is bed-time. You 
have won enough for one night, and I would not tempt the fickle 
goddess any more were I in your place.' 

" ' Just as you like, my stern mentor,' laughed the 'Queen,' as 
she gathered up her huge pile of notes and gold. The pile was too 
large for her to carry, and as I was close to her I said: * Would 
you allow me to help you to carry all your wealth? " 

o Had I paused to think for a moment I should never have 
thought of hazarding such a question, for how could she tell that 
I was not some thief or sharper? On hearing me, however, she 
turned round, looked me full in the face, and quietly said: 

" <0, please do! I shall be so much obliged if you will.' 

There was not the slightest bit of hesitation about her, as she 
took the opera hat I held in my hand, pressed out the spring and 
quietly filled it with the notes and gold. She then handed it to 
me, and led the way out of the casino. Seymour, who looked 
appalled at my temerity, stood staring after us as we went out 
into the moonlight. At the hotel door I was about to deliver up 
my valuable charge and retire, when the elderly lady said: 

" -Could I persuade you to join us in a cup of tea, Mr. ' 

1 filled up the blank with Brereton. 

"•Mr. Brereton, I know it seems informal, but here, among 
foreigners, I think formalities should be dropped.' 

" I noticed that when I mentioned my name, the 'Queen ' turn- 
ed suddenly pale, and gave me a look which made my very veins 
tingle. 

" I of course accepted the invitation so frankly offered. I was, 
in turn, introduced to the 'Queen ' as Miss Christy, and to the 
elder lady as Mrs. Markham. 

"Christy 1 Christy 1 When and where had I heard that name? 
Again I looked at the 'Queen/ and again our eyes met in a long 
look. 

" • I believe, Mrs. Markham/ I remarked, < that you and Miss 
Christy are from Australia. May I ask what part? ' 

" <0, yes/ Mrs. Markham said, ' we are both of us 'cornstalks/ 
We are from near Dubbo, on the Maquarrie River, New South 
Wales.' 

"Great Heavens! Dubbo! Why, that was close to where I 
spent those two years in the bush. 

" I must have flushed up, for Miss Christy noticed my confu- 
sion, and said: ' You seem to know the place, Mr. Beaton.' 

" ' Excuse me. ' Brereton ' I said/ 

" It was now her turn to blush and look perplexed. 'Brere- 
ton! ' she muttered, half aloud. She then begged to be excused 
a few minutes, leaving me alone with Mrs, Markham. She soon 
returned, looking pale as death, and trembling like a leaf. She 
almost staggered up to my seat, and with a shaking hand gave 
me an envelope and a small jewel case. The envelope contained 
a photograph of myself, taken in stockman's dress, and the case 
the trinkets I had given to my poor dead Eenaweena. 

" In a second the truth flashed across my brain. Here was the 
little girl I had left unborn in Australia, and whose very existence 
had almost passed out of my mind] I will spare you the de- 
scription of the scene which followed, but it was more like the 
ending of some play than reality. 

"It appeared that the Mr. and Mrs. Christy, who had adopted 
my little waif, had both died, and had left her sole heiress to 
some two million pounds' worth of property and cash. Nina and 
Mrs. Markham were about to return in a month to Australia. 

" I promised to follow them as soon as I could. 

"It was the least I could do to make up for my past neglect, 
to spend the rest of my life in the land for which I have often had 
such a longing. 

"Last month I got along letter from Nina, enclosing a draft 
for £20,000, 'in case/ as she put it, 'poor Dad's hard up/ and, old 
fellow, I am now on my way to the Antipodes by the next steamer." 

San Francisco, January 14, 1891. Wm. Lovel Eyre. 



At Moraghan's old stand in the California Market are always to be 
found fresh and luscious oysters, both eastern and Californian. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 24, 1891. 




THE London Court Journal says: As a result of the revived in- 
terest in hypnotism caused by the Eyraud-Borapard trial in 
Paris, some experiments in hypnotism were recently made at the 
Hotel Kaiserhof, Berlin, when some startling results were pro- 
duced. One subject in a hypnotic condition showed that it is not 
always possible to suggest to a hypnotized person to perform acts 
which are absolutely contrary to that person's natural inclinations. 
The subject in question was a sportsman who was successfully 
made to believe that he was present at a horse race at which he 
had backed the winning horse, but when it was suggested to him 
that he should divide his winnings he awoke with a start. Even 
the most susceptible person can successfully resist being hypno- 
tized by taking a deep breath the moment he begins to feel the 
hypnotizer's influence. 

At a wedding the other week, in London, the bridegroom de- 
parted altogether from the regulation set of gifts one hears of, and 
gave the eight bridesmaids handsome diamond shoe-buckles. No 
doubt the girls highly appreciated this somewhat unique gift, for 
with full dress toilettes, shoe-buckles are just now a very impor- 
tant item. Moonstones nave been very popular for this pur- 
pose. It was said a short time ago that bridesmaids were soon 
to be a thing of the past, but it would seem as though they in- 
crease rather than decrease, for at many of the best weddings that 
have taken place lately, eight or twelve have been the usual num- 
ber. 

Queen Victoria's daughters, in addition to being excellent needle 
women, are also good cooks. When they were children they had 
a little kitchen of their own at Osborne, where they concocted all 
sorts of dishes, sweets being naturally the favorites. Here they 
converted into jam the fruit out of their own gardens, and turned 
out many a savory dish for the delectation of their brothers, all of 
whom had as excellent appetites as generally appertain to boys. 
At least one of the princesses still continues to cook an occasional 
little plat, and has been heard to say that she would have made an 
excellent chef. 

The latest idea of the New York belle is to wear a boa made of 
real chrysanthemums. The long stalks are bound together after 
the fashion known to children in making daisy-chains. The 
flowers last fresh the whole afternoon or evening. The boa is 
about eight feet long, and the color of the chrysanthemums is as- 
sorted to the costume. The price is high, but that is of no conse- 
quence to the ladies of New York. If the boa looks drooping and 
fagged out, it can be revived by a liberal application from a 
watering-can. 

Sarah Bernhardt has set all Paris crazy by her African com- 
plexion, the cosmetic for which is a concoction of her own. The 
compound consists of saffron, well-kneaded with powdered coffee, 
combined with a delicate mixture of musk and chicory, diluted 
with rose-water until sufficiently liquid to be spread over the skin. 

The London Court Circular remarks : Many Londoners have been 
wondering of late how it is that science, which can do so much 
nowadays, seems powerless to avert fog. We bad pretty near a 
whole week of it a short time ago, and every winter it seems to 
get worse. We have been clever at electric lighting, the wily ba- 
cillus is being hunted, and, in some cases, it is to be hoped stamped 
out, but the fogs come and go as of old, and leave us helpless. 
Will no savant take up the matter, and earn the everlasting grati- 
tude of his countrymen? 

In these days of stage realism it is not astonishing to hear that 
a French author has written a drama which is to introduce Dr. 
Koch's lymph and the cure of a consumption patient in the last 
act. A patriotic Frenchman should rather have turned his atten- 
tion to hydrophobia and patronized Pasteur, and that disease 
would be much more lively on the stage than consumption. 

Underground London is far more wonderful than underground 
Paris. Take, for example, its 3,000 miles of sewers, its 34,000 miles 
of telegraph wires, its 4,500 miles of water mains, its 3,200 miles of 
gas-pipes, all definitely fixed. Yet not even these compare with 
the vast cellarage area beneath the feet of the pedestrian. In Ox- 
ford and Regent streets alone the capacity is said to exceed 140 
acres. 

An English journal informs us that advanced views are being 
held in America on the subject of the wedding ring. Brides are 
declining to wear it unless bridegrooms do so as well. "I will 
wear one with pleasure if he does," they say. Several recent 
bridegrooms have adopted the new fashion, and wear a plain gold 
hoop upon the ring-finger. 



THE DELBECK CHAMPAGNES ! 



THE EXTRA K, 

THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE. 




l£?( EXTRA Ys 
DRY 



THE 1 BRUT, 

The highest grade of Champagne without 
sweetness. 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(Established 1720, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oils. 




JAMES DE FREMERY & CO., - San Francisco, 

General Agents, Pacific foast. 

/ETNA MINERAL WATER COMPANY 

Invites Public Attention to the Justly Celebrated 

/ETNA NATURAL MINERAL WATER, 

One of the Invaluable Kesources of this Wonderful State, and ch al 
lenges comparison of its demonstrated and acknowledged merits with 
those of any other Mineral Water, native or foreign. Citizens and 
families of San Francisco, who have used iETNA since it was put on 
the market, pronounce it — either as a Beverage and Table Water, or 
as a Preserver and Restorer of Health— Superior to any other known 
Mineral Water. Leading Physicians here and throughout the State 
ecommend its daily use by both sick and well. 



/Etna Mineral Water Co. 

104, 106 and 108 Drumm St., S. F. 



TELEPHONE S3 6. 



LOUIS SLOSS & CO., 



AGENTS FOR THE 



K AELTJK! 
And other well-known Brands of Alaska Canned Salmon, 



310 Sansome Street, Sau Francisco, California. 



COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Phelan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for posl 
tively extracting teeth without pain. " Colton Gas " has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
iu all cases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operation6in dentistry. 



DR. CHARLES W. DECKER. 



Jan. 21, 1891 



,-\\ PR \\i [S( NEWS l.nrn;. 



26 



ST. MATTHEWS' HALL, 

S^kJfcT MATEO, C-a-X^. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS ! 

Twenty-fifth Yc»r. Ki-ier Term oommanca Thursday, Januarys, 1851. 

REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A„ Rector, 

TYLER HALL 



Preparatory Department ol St. Matthews Hall, San Mateo, California, 
FOR YOl'NG BOYS. 



Easter Session will commence THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 1891. 
For catalogues and full Information address 



REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, M. A., Rector. 



THE CALIFORNIA. 

Strictly European Plan. Absolutely Fire-proof, 

OPENED DECEMBER 1, 1890. 

The only hotel in San Francisco that has sun in rooms entire day. This 
is the only strictly first-class hotel in the city. Masnificent appointments. 
Unparalleled in beauty and brilliancy. Unquestionably the most beautful 
and luxuriously furnished hotel in America. Rooms en suite with baths 
of latest exposed sanitary plumbing. Electric lights throughout. Every 
convenience for comfort of guests. Most centrally located, being in the 
midst of amusements, art galleries, shops and other places of interest. 

Its cuisine is of a peculiar excellence. The best and handsomest Res- 
taurant in the city. Service perfect. Half portions served. 

Rooms |1 per day and upwards. 

HORD & KINZLER, Managers . 

The Strath more Apartment House, 

>. W. corner Larkln and Fulton Streets. 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR FAMILIES. 

First-class iu every respect. Elevator day and night. First-class Restau- 
rant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. HAYWAKO.No. 224 Cali- 
fornia Street. 



MAISON RICHE, 

The Leading Restaurant, 
104 Grant Avenue and 44 Ueary Street, San Francisco. 



Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Supper, Wedding and Theatre Parties 

Supplied in the very best style and short notice. 
Telephone No. 1088. 

Mills' College for Young Women 



The next Term begins WEDNESDAY, January 7, 1891. 
For information address 

Mrs. C. T. MILLS, 
Mills' Colleg e Postoffice, California. 

MME. B. ZISKA, A. M., 

(Recently Principal of Zeitska Institute) 
1606 California Street, 

continues to receive a limited number of pupils, who wish to receive pri- 
vate instruction under her special direction. Four young ladies admitted 
as resident students. French, German, English and all the branches of a 
complete education. 



Miss Ellen Coubsen 
VOCAL 



Mr. Joseph Roeckel. 

coi>rsEE,^r_A_rroE,ir 3 

320 POST STREET. 
Private iesyons and Classes Resumed. 



HENRY C. HYDE 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 
MICROSCOPICAL. EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, InkB, Papers, etc.. In the Detection of Forgeries. 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

41 IX CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco' 




Sanborn, Vail & Co., 



BAH FBAHCI8CO, 

Portland and. XjOs ,A.n.g-eles. 



Finest Materials for the Use of Artists! 

Oil Colors in Tubes, Water colors 
III Cakes, Moist Colors in Tubes and 
Pans; Water Color Liquids, Mediums, 
Oils and Varnisbes in Bottles. 

llriiNhes for Oil nn<l Water Color Falntlne; Can- 
vas. Academy Boards. MtPU'hlii<r Papers, (J, .1.1 Paint. 
Materials lor China PalntlDfC, ■■allrlles, Easels 
MiKlles. Hand Hnohs on Hie fine Arts. All oilier 
Articles used by Amateurs and Artists. 

Wholesale and Retail, 857-850-861 Market St., 8. F. 





Hammond Typewriter, 

WITH 

Ideal and Universal 




KEY-BOARD. 

See the New Universal. 

Supplies and Repairs for all Machines. 
SCOTT & BANNAN, 213 Sansome Street, S. F. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings B^nk. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1890, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Jive and Fifty-two Oue-hundredths (5.52) per cent per annum 
on Term Deposits, and Four and Sixty Oue-hundredths (4.60) per cent per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday, 
Jaiiuary 2, 18.-1. B. O. CARR, Secretary. 

Office— No. 805 Market street, Flood Building. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directorsgof this society, held THIS 
DAY, a dividend has been declared at the rate of i\i per cent per annum 
on all deposits for the six months euding December 31, 1890, free from all 
taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1891. R. J. TOBIN, Sec. 

Office— Northeast corner Montgomery and Post Streets, S. F., Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTI